daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 4th, 2011, 04:12 PM   #161
Dan78
Registered User
 
Dan78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Boston/Washington DC/Berlin
Posts: 156
Likes (Received): 55

Quote:
Originally Posted by greg_christine View Post
The theory is that a rail vehicle can attract "choice riders" (people who own cars), whereas a bus can't. I have to admit that I am dubious that a streetcar stuck in traffic will be any more attractive than a bus stuck in traffic. At least the buses can change lanes to get around double-parked delivery trucks. The decision to build the streetcar network has already been made, so we will see how it works in a few years.
At least one of the streetcar routes will have its own designated lanes (K Street). K Street is wider than most DC east-west streets.

Personally, I'd rather have more Metrorail lines in lieu of the streetcars, but as America can't seem to build a new 15 km subway line for less than 500 billion dollars and in a time frame less than 50 years nowadays (OK, this is an exaggeration, but you get the idea) this seems to be a good "Second Prize" for the District of Columbia.

As far as buses versus streetcars, studies have borne out that Americans are much more likely to utilize streetcars than buses and streetcars are better at promoting economic growth (The bus fanatic Australian guy at HumanTransit.org notwithstanding). In America anyway, buses have various stigma associated with them, and have the perception of being impermanent and subject to overnight rerouting due to funding cuts or political whims. With a streetcar, you know the tracks are there to stay.
Dan78 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 4th, 2011, 04:48 PM   #162
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,749

The streets seem wide enough to allow separation between trams and cars.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 5th, 2011, 02:17 AM   #163
diablo234
Oh No He Didn't
 
diablo234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 5,297

They probably should have followed Toronto's example and put the tracks in the middle of H street. I can foresee alot of problems with their current setup.
diablo234 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 5th, 2011, 03:01 AM   #164
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan78 View Post
At least one of the streetcar routes will have its own designated lanes (K Street). K Street is wider than most DC east-west streets.

Personally, I'd rather have more Metrorail lines in lieu of the streetcars, but as America can't seem to build a new 15 km subway line for less than 500 billion dollars and in a time frame less than 50 years nowadays (OK, this is an exaggeration, but you get the idea) this seems to be a good "Second Prize" for the District of Columbia.

As far as buses versus streetcars, studies have borne out that Americans are much more likely to utilize streetcars than buses and streetcars are better at promoting economic growth (The bus fanatic Australian guy at HumanTransit.org notwithstanding). In America anyway, buses have various stigma associated with them, and have the perception of being impermanent and subject to overnight rerouting due to funding cuts or political whims. With a streetcar, you know the tracks are there to stay.
I agree regarding rather having Metrorail. The streetcar plan represents the realization that money will never be available to add Metrorail lines in Anacostia, Georgetown, and other under-served areas of the city.

Streetcars can probably attract more passengers per route-mile than buses, but not more passengers per dollar in costs to the transportation agency. Washington, DC can only afford to build streetcar lines on a few routes. Buses will continue to be an important part of the transportation network.
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 5th, 2011, 06:07 AM   #165
geoking66
Registered User
 
geoking66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: London, New York
Posts: 3,265
Likes (Received): 7308

They should have just removed the lines of parallel parks cars and used that space to create a tram only lane and a bike lane (about the same width as a normal car lane).
geoking66 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2011, 09:14 AM   #166
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17037

__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2011, 06:55 PM   #167
elliot42
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: St Louis
Posts: 126
Likes (Received): 52

Quote:
Originally Posted by geoking66 View Post
They should have just removed the lines of parallel parks cars and used that space to create a tram only lane and a bike lane (about the same width as a normal car lane).
No, because businesses on the street will lose significant customers. This has been demonstrated repeatedly in other cities.

Streetcars work just fine in Philadelphia, San Francisco, New Orleans, Denver, Portland, Seattle, and elsewhere, and they'll work just as well in DC.
elliot42 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2011, 09:07 PM   #168
trainrover
:-x
 
trainrover's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,787
Likes (Received): 738

Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
They probably should have followed Toronto's example and put the tracks in the middle of H street. I can foresee alot of problems with their current setup.
Centre-lane running's popular in Toronto because most of its roads are narrow, e.g., you come across a six-laner no less than say every couple or three miles, a four-laner every single or couple of miles. Toronto trams get stuck behind left- and right-turning traffic so often that it takes several green lights (series of) for the tram to finally proceed across a single intersection. Even with their six-lane St-Clair-Ave-W tram-equipped line, trams often get stuck behind left-turning traffic, which now from seeing those photos that seemed to trouble you makes me nod approval at H Street's(?) traffic lanes chosen for tram passage.

Also, the tram lane pictured above is closer to the kerb than your preferred centre lane, so I'd be far more interested at learning about the District's plans down there at mitigating private vehicles colliding with would-be / have-been passengers, frankly, because Toronto trams are --uhm-- poorly stickered as far as indicating to nearby drivers the compulsory stop-for-tram provision in the provincial highway code... ...although (moreover!) why not just go for accordion trolleybusses, you know, the type with multiple! accordions. (Toronto collisions have been awful: Abundance of stress/shock; trams --if at all possible!-- detoured for blocks or miles on end during intensive police investigation; ensuing traffic jams; etc.)

Last edited by trainrover; June 16th, 2011 at 09:50 PM.
trainrover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2011, 10:02 AM   #169
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17037

Recent H streetcar construction photos...

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar tracks by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

H Street streetcar station by BeyondDC, on Flickr
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 10th, 2011, 10:10 AM   #170
BoulderGrad
Registered User
 
BoulderGrad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 5,512
Likes (Received): 1177

What lines are under construction at the moment?
__________________
My safety word is "Keep Going."
BoulderGrad no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2011, 08:22 AM   #171
Liam0711
Birdland Enthusiast
 
Liam0711's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Towson
Posts: 377
Likes (Received): 1

Nice pics Nexis...hopefully the street cars turn out to be a success. Just out of curiosity, do you know of any other recent street car lines being developed around the nation...not proposals, but actual lines being built? Baltimore had plans for a streetcar line going up Charles Street but it seems to be dead at the present moment.
__________________
Baltimore, Maryland.
Liam0711 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2011, 08:31 AM   #172
Liam0711
Birdland Enthusiast
 
Liam0711's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Towson
Posts: 377
Likes (Received): 1

Red Line gets federal go-ahead for next phase
East-west rail line project for city clears a crucial hurdle

June 27, 2011|By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun
The Maryland Transit Administration's proposed Red Line in Baltimore has received U.S. approval to move to the next phase of development, a strong indication that the east-west light rail line will eventually qualify for federal funding.

Gov. Martin O'Malley plans to announce Tuesday that the Federal Transit Administration has given the state the green light to move into what is known as preliminary engineering, or PE — a phase that would take the project beyond the conceptual stage and into specific planning.

The approval would start a roughly two-year planning process for the 141/2-mile line fromWoodlawn to Bayview — a project that the federal agency estimated would cost a total of $2.2 billion with inflation. The state previously described the Red Line as a $1.8 billion project in 2010 dollars.

The decision does not mean the federal government has agreed to pay for the project's construction. Henry Kay, the MTA's deputy administrator for planning, said that decision would be made later. But he said the federal action means the Red Line has survived a process that weeds out many projects.

"It's a big deal," Kay said. "PE approval really represents a major milestone."

But opponents of the project questioned the importance of the federal action.

"The reality of this is that there's no money," said Benjamin Rosenberg, a resident of Canton. "The likelihood of the funding in the next couple years is zero."

Kay said the PE process will cost about $65 million. He said that many of the engineering contracts have been awarded and that work has been awaiting federal approval. He said the state would likely pay most of the upfront costs but would be eligible for federal reimbursement when money becomes available.

While the Red Line has the enthusiastic support of the O'Malley administration, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and most city elected officials, it faces opposition from some residents of neighborhoods in its path — especially those in Canton and West Baltimore.

Plans for the Red Line call for the tracks to run in one long tunnel under downtown and Fells Point and in one shorter tunnel under Cooks Lane in West Baltimore. The rest of the route would run above ground, including sections on Boston Street and Edmondson Avenue.

Advocates contend the Red Line is needed to relieve traffic congestion and to provide an attractive transit alternative to reach some of the city's major employment centers, including the Inner Harbor, Harbor East, the University of Maryland professional schools and the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

"Baltimore has been underserved by public transit," said Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin. "We are now closer to having a truly integrated, regional transit system that will help transform our city and our region, adding a convenient, affordable east-west alternative to the ever-increasing gridlock."

But opponents maintain that a light rail line would detract from the ambience of the neighborhoods it runs through and would fail to attract the ridership officials have projected.

In fact, while they gave the Red Line the OK to move to the next step, federal officials may have also given opponents ammunition by lowering the estimates of daily ridership from 60,000 to 57,000 and hanging a higher price tag on the project.

Kay said it's not unusual for ridership estimates to fluctuate during the planning of a transit line. And he noted that the agency approved the move to the next step despite the lower ridership figures.

"When they signed off on 57,000 they agreed we're making reasonable assumptions," he said.

The new, $2.2 billion figure represents a difference in the way the federal agency computes costs and the way the state does, Kay said.

"It's not because the price has gone up or we've changed the scope" of the project, he said.

Nevertheless, the federal estimate would also raise the amount of money the state would have to come up with to pay its likely 50 percent share of the project.

Meanwhile, the state is also seeking federal approval for a similarly priced light rail project called the Purple Line in Montgomery and Prince George's counties.

Kay said a decision on whether the Purple Line can move to the next stage is likely to come later this summer.

The cost of the two transit lines became an issue in last year's gubernatorial campaign when Republican Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said he would scrap plans for light rail on the two lines, saying the state could not afford them. But O'Malley insists the projects are needed to relieve congestion and improve air quality in the two metropolitan areas.

Canton resident Rosenberg said he's confident that opponents will ultimately block the project when it comes time to come up with the money for construction.

"The time really is on our side and not on the side of the people who have been promoting this," he said. "Until somebody finds $2 billion, obviously this thing's not going to be built."

Construction of a new transit line with federal assistance is a laborious, drawn-out process involving minute examination of a local agency's plans, costs, projected revenues and ridership assumptions. Approvals can take many years.

The Red Line planning process was in the works for several years before public hearings on alternatives were held in 2008. In 2009, O'Malley made the final decision to build a light rail line instead of a rapid-bus alternative. Proposals for more extensive tunneling were scrapped because the costs would have exceeded federal limits.

According to the MTA, if the project clears the remaining hurdles and federal and state funding is available, it would take until about 2020 to complete the Red Line.

Kay said the PE process would bring the planning to the point where it is about 60 percent complete and ready to move into the final design phase. By the time preliminary engineering is done, such things as the design of the stations and the appearance of the train cars should be known, he said.

The federal approval comes as work is progressing on such matters as design of the 20 proposed stations on the Red Line. The MTA has 17 Station Area Advisory Committees, made up of an estimated 250 volunteers, working on things such as platform location and pedestrian access.

Engineers under contract with the state have also been contacting homeowners in some of the neighborhoods along the path of the Red Line, asking for access to their basements to determine whether tunneling could cause any problems.

Kay said the MTA needs to know how deep the basements go in some older neighborhoods such as Fells Point and Canton, where many homes don't have construction plans on file with the city. He said that such inspections are voluntary and that the MTA does not need access to every home.

The MTA does not expect tunneling to have an impact on existing buildings, Kay said. He said the average tunnel depth would be 40 to 50 feet below ground. That is comparable to the depth of the Metro tunnel under neighborhoods such as Upton and Bolton Hill, he added.

Kay said that in his many years at the MTA, he has never heard complaints about noise or vibrations caused by the subway.

[email protected]
__________________
Baltimore, Maryland.
Liam0711 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 11th, 2011, 01:12 PM   #173
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17037

http://greatergreaterwashington.org/...nsit-projects/

Quote:
by Dan Malouff • June 29, 2011 10:17 am

With yesterday's news that the Baltimore Red Line is being advanced to Preliminary Engineering, it seems a good time to check up on the various rail and BRT projects in the region and report on their status.


Proposed Baltimore Red Line subway station. Image from MTA.
Here are the 15 major rail and BRT projects in our region.

Norfolk "The Tide" light rail
  • Status: Construction
  • Construction is largely complete. Trains and tracks are in testing now.
  • Anticipated completion: August 19, 2011



H Street streetcar
  • Status: Construction
  • Streetcar running from Union Station to the Anacostia River via H Street. Under construction now.
  • Anticipated completion: 2012


Silver Line Phase I
  • Status: Construction
  • Metrorail extension from East Falls Church to Reston via Tysons Corner. Under construction now.
  • Anticipated completion: 2013


Crystal City/Potomac Yard busway
  • Status: Design
  • Exclusive busway from Crystal City Metro to Braddock Road Metro. Final design underway now. Some segments have already been constructed by private developers.
  • Anticipated completion: 2013


Baltimore Red Line
  • Status: Design
  • Light rail line running east-west through Baltimore. Recently advanced to Preliminary Engineering from Concept.
  • Anticipated completion: 2016


Silver Line Phase II
  • Status: Design
  • Metrorail extension from Reston to Loudoun County via Dulles Airport. Preliminary Engineering currently underway.
  • Anticipated completion: 2017


K Street Transitway
  • Status: Design
  • Exclusive transit lanes running east-west on K Street from Washington Circle to Mount Vernon Square. Environmental work completed in 2009, now awaiting funding before moving forward.
  • Anticipated completion: Not published

Anacostia streetcar
  • Status: Construction/Concept
  • Streetcar from South Capitol Street to 11th Street bridge via Ancostia Metro. Construction of a short segment near South Capitol Street is mostly complete. The majority of the line is undergoing an alternatives analysis/environmental review that will be completed late in 2011.
  • Anticipated completion: Not published


Benning Road streetcar
  • Status: Concept
  • Extension of the H Street Streetcar east across Anacostia River to Benning Road Metro. Alternatives analysis & environmental review to begin summer 2011.
  • Anticipated completion: 2015


Columbia Pike streetcar
  • Status: Concept
  • Streetcar from Pentagon City to Bailey's Crossroads via Columbia Pike. Environmental planning underway now.
  • Anticipated completion: 2016


Potomac Yard Metro station
  • Status: Concept
  • Infill Metro station in Alexandria. Environmental planning underway now.
  • Anticipated completion: 2016


K Street streetcar
  • Status: Concept
  • Extension of the H Street Streetcar west to Washington Circle through downtown Washington, potentially via the K Street Transitway. Alternatives analysis & environmental review to begin summer 2011.
  • Anticipated completion: 2018


Crystal City/Potomac Yard streetcar
  • Status: Concept
  • Potential conversion of CCPY busway to streetcar. Environmental planning underway.
  • Anticipated completion: Not published

Maryland Purple Line
  • Status: Concept
  • Light rail line running east-west through Maryland suburbs of DC. Concept stage largely complete. Expected to move to Preliminary Engineering in summer or autumn 2011.
  • Anticipated completion: 2020


Corridor Cities Transitway
  • Status: Concept
  • Light rail or BRT line running north from Shady Grove Metro. Concept stage nearing completion. Mode will be determined this year. Expected to move to Preliminary Engineering in late 2011 or 2012.
  • Anticipated completion: 2020


DC streetcar other segments
  • Status: Pre-concept
  • The rest of DC's proposed 37 mile streetcar system. Planning has not yet begun.
  • Anticipated completion: Not published
  • The concept phase is early planning, including alternatives analysis and environmental clearance. Design is the engineering phase, including Preliminary Engineering (PE). For projects in this phase, conceptual details have been finalized and detailed construction plans are being prepared.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2011, 10:34 PM   #174
Joke Insurance
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 13
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alargule View Post
Is that an official plan, of just a fantasy?
It is just a fantasy.
Joke Insurance no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 16th, 2011, 03:35 PM   #175
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17037

Quote:
Final report downgrades Montgomery "BRT"

Last week, the Montgomery County DOT released its final study on a future county-wide BRT system. The system has the potential to improve transit options for many county residents. But four months after the study's draft executive summary was released, it's clear that expectations have already been lowered and that many questions remain.

image hosted on flickr

San Joaquin RTD BRT Stop by San Joaquin RTD, on Flickr

As Dan Reed wrote when the summary draft was published, the plan identifed 16 potential routes, covering 150 miles and just as many stations. The study's model predicted significant time savings over current transit options on each of the routes and in some cases even travel time savings over driving.

Very little has changed between the study's draft summary and the now-finished product, but what has changed is definitely worth noting. Revisions to the study team's forecasting model resulted in significant reductions in predicted ridership numbers.

The range of expected daily boardings for the whole network has been revised to 165,600-207,000, down some 20% from the originally estimated 213,100-266,400 boardings. This drop in predicted ridership ripples throughout the report, resulting in lengthened recommended headways, increased total operating and maintenance costs, and reduced farebox recovery ratios.

These revisions may not be all bad given the large number of transit projects that have suffered from inflated ridership estimates and too-conservative operating cost projections.

On the other hand, lower predicted ridership and higher costs may give notoriously road-focused MCDOT reason to whittle away at the plan as it moves ever so slowly to fruition. After all, BRT's broad spectrum of implementation levels and scalability can be both a blessing and a curse.

What's also disappointing about the plan is its focus on traditional travel patterns of the county today. The model even assumed "unconstrained availability of parking" at three potential park-and-ride stations, underscoring the fact that this study is not really a change of approach for Montgomery County's transit planning. Of the 16 potential routes, only 3 of them are true cross-county routes, while the rest move primarily north to south. 8 of the routes end at Metro stations.

The emphasis on access to Metro stations and importance of parking availability in the ridership models indicates a continued emphasis on commuter trips that start in a car, rather than in a transit-oriented development that supports all-hours trips that don't require a car at all.

Most of all, though, the plan doesn't come close to proposing true Bus Rapid Transit.

The system would use articulated, 60-foot, hybrid low floor "BRT Vehicles" with automatic vehicle locators and other technology. Interestingly these "BRT Vehicles" sound remarkably like the newest 60-foot hybrid buses with WMATA operates on its heaviest routes like the X2 and 71.

Only "major stations serving at least 500 daily boardings by the year 2040," would get infrastructure upgrades beyond a typical bus stop, and even then, "stations" will primarily consist of an "extended shelter, benches," and some additional aesthetic treatments.

First, for a well-designed BRT route, these treatments should be afforded to every stop. Consistent station treatment unifies a rapid transit system's "premium transit service" feel. What if some metro stations only had 200 foot platforms? Secondly, a true rapid transit service should not be serving any stops that don't attract 500 people per day anyway. If the density for this transit demand doesn't exist, those stops should be omitted from the BRT line to begin with.

Finally, the infrastructure choices may prove problematic. Where busways are recommended, which is only about two-thirds of the route length, the study proposes "guided busways" for a large portion of the infrastructure. The study doesn't offer more specific technology recommendations, but guided busways are relatively uncommon around the world, having never proved particularly beneficial for the additional investment they require.

Human Transit's Jarret Walker wrote last week upon the opening of the world's longest guided busway in Cambridgeshire, England:

"If this busway doesn't turn up significant benefits in customer experience, it will probably be the last, or at least the last to be done with guide-wheels. Adelaide's pioneering O-Bahn is now 25 years old, so one hopes the state of the art has moved on."
Guided busways have even been problematic in many cities. After a few years of operation, Edinburgh determined to tear out its busway and replace it with light rail. In Crawley, England, south of London, the Fastway system installed one-way guided busways in several places where previously had been poorly enforced bus lanes.
The result: only the two bus routes that were officially part of the Fastway system and had guidewheels could use the guideways, leaving the other bus lines to fend for themselves in mixed traffic. Even the Fastway routes have been sometimes stymied by this problem on the occasion that too many guided buses are out of service.

The primary benefit to guided busways is the fact that they allow designers to somewhat shrink the width of the required right of way. In other words: they give transit-skeptical planners and elected officials one more way to save precious SOV space.

Are the costs and headaches worth it? Doubtful, but we've already learned that Montgomery County will do practically anything to avoiding giving over space from cars to transit. Most of the other guided bus systems across the globe use the technology because there literally is not enough space for full-width lanes and busways in their chosen right-of-way.

Montgomery County has proposed, for much of the system, to build one-way busways that can be used by buses traveling in the peak direction, leaving buses traveling in the opposite direction to compete in mixed traffic. Does this mean that the busway will have station infrastructure on both sides of the guideway? Presumably. Bus stops or stations would also then need to be placed along the outide of the main roadway in both directions as well, further duplicating infrastructure.

This could mean that roads with one lane, reversible busways would need four stops at each station location. In the morning, the busway would need a right-side platform for southbound buses, while the sidewalk on the northbound curb would need a platform as well. In the afternoon, the busway would need a right-side platform for northbound buses (opposite the morning stop), and the sidewalk on the southbound curb would need a platform.

The logistical headache of operating bi-directional one-lane guideways, combined with the infrastructure duplication of building up to four stations in each direction along the guideways, emphasizes MCDOT's utter reluctance to actually reallocate space from single-occupancy vehicles to high-occupancy transit vehicles. This reluctance may very well land the County's nascent system among the ranks of America's countless other faux-BRTs.
http://greatergreaterwashington.org/...ontgomery-brt/
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2011, 10:23 PM   #176
Liam0711
Birdland Enthusiast
 
Liam0711's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Towson
Posts: 377
Likes (Received): 1

August 24, 2011 - Michael Dresser - Baltimore Sun

Group raising funds to support Red Line

A group of Baltimore residents will hold a pro-Red Line pep rally tonight in a hotbed of opposition to the proposed light rail tonight to raise money to advocate for the project.

The Red Line Now PAC will hold its event at 6 p.m. at the Field House Pub at 2400 Boston Street in Canton, where many local residents have protested plans to run trains along the surface of that street.

"This is one of the few issue-driven political action committees created by everyday Baltimore citizens, and the only one to focus on transit," said Robbyn Lewis, the organization's chairperson. "We want this project to be the best it can be."
__________________
Baltimore, Maryland.
Liam0711 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2011, 10:24 PM   #177
Liam0711
Birdland Enthusiast
 
Liam0711's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Towson
Posts: 377
Likes (Received): 1

Red Line PAC (Political Action Committee)

http://red-line-now.com/

I suggest you join and get involved if you feel strongly about this particular issue.
__________________
Baltimore, Maryland.
Liam0711 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2011, 10:27 PM   #178
trainrover
:-x
 
trainrover's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,787
Likes (Received): 738

How come the cities' networks are pegged together into this thread?
__________________
.
hee hee
.
trainrover no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 1st, 2011, 10:53 PM   #179
Liam0711
Birdland Enthusiast
 
Liam0711's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Towson
Posts: 377
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
How come the cities' networks are pegged together into this thread?
The two cities are becoming increasingly intertwined both cultrually and economically. Its only a matter of time before Washington and Baltimore are linked via mass transit. The MARC Train is a commuter rail that already links the cities and both are already connected through Amtrack's northeast corridor infrastructure.
__________________
Baltimore, Maryland.
Liam0711 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 2nd, 2011, 04:47 AM   #180
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17037

Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
How come the cities' networks are pegged together into this thread?
In 20 years will the current Growth rate both cities will be 1.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
baltimore, public transit, washington

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium