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Old April 2nd, 2013, 06:16 PM   #101
Falubaz
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Nevertheless it's really stupid name for a sandwich
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Old April 2nd, 2013, 10:47 PM   #102
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Quote:
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Interesting aspect, though it seems debatable which way the word "subway" took. It could as well originate in the US and have come to Glasgow. I would believe like you that it went from Glasgow to the US, but the only etymological reference I could find that goes into enough detail states that "The sense of "underground railway in a city" is first recorded 1893, in reference to Boston." [Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper]

The Boston subway, however, opened 9 months after Glasgow's. Both must have been planning and building at about the same time. Chicago came 4 years before Glasgow, but was elevated and being called "El", not "subway", at least not in the beginning.

Chicago: June 6, 1892,
Glasgow: Dec 14, 1896,
Boston: Sep 1, 1897,
New York: Oct 27, 1904

Is there any other evidence which way the word "subway" took? Could it have come up independently in Glasgow and Boston?
Both uses of subway originate in the UK, a bit like the term soccer.

The first subway was the Tower Subway in London in 1870. It was converted to pedestrian usage after a year but the term was used for the first tube railway before it opened in 1890 (City and South London Railway was originally the city and Southwark Subway). Glasgow's subway was early like Boston's and both used the term subway from the start (a couple of other London schemes used the term for a while too). The terms tube and underground became popular for London's underground lines early on, meanwhile Boston was followed by New York.

One of the early planned subways was from South Kensington to the Royal Albert Hall but it ended up being built without a railway in it, meanwhile the pedestrian Tower Subway stayed open until 1898 and the name stuck for a pedestrian underground route. Probably why Glasgow changed from Subway to Underground, but I like Subway for it better.
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Old April 4th, 2013, 12:20 AM   #103
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Interesting!
Here are the missing sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_of...#Establishment
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_Subway
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Old April 4th, 2013, 02:56 PM   #104
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Also worth noting:

The Kingsway Subway, for trams.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsway_tramway_subway
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Old April 4th, 2013, 11:41 PM   #105
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Am I the only one here caring for sources?
http://dewi.ca/trains/conduit/subway.html
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Old April 7th, 2013, 04:28 PM   #106
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Quote:
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The worst logos for me are the Tyne & Wear Metro (it just looks so old and tired, the font is ugly and just sums up 'Thatcher's austerity Britain' to me for some reason, it looks cheap)
I couldn't disagree more. I think the yellow and black M is instantly recognisable making it easy to find Metro stations and I think it's stood the test of time since it was designed in the late 70s.

I actually really like the Tyne and Wear Metro branding. It's consistent and has been modernised very carefully without changing fundamental principles. I think the M logo and Calvert MT font really work together to produce a cohesive brand which still holds up 40 years after it was designed.
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Old April 8th, 2013, 12:09 AM   #107
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Why did they call it a subway? Normally in English speaking non-American nations, a 'subway' is just a passage under something
English ain't Scotland's first language, so might this anull your query? Also, "non-American nations" is mystifying . . .
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Old April 8th, 2013, 12:29 AM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by micro View Post
make sure to get the exact logos that stand for the respective metro, e.g. is in use as entrance signs
Maybe the title to this thread should use the word icon instead of logo, coz Montreal's icon must always be coupled to the word Métro, as all the respondents' accompanying icons thus far here to their favouring it are missing that underscoring word.
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Old April 8th, 2013, 01:05 AM   #109
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Honestly, this is the best for me,
image hosted on flickr

Happy end: Kadıköy 'M' sign by ardac, on Flickr

I can only compare it with London's and Shanghai's.

1- İstanbul

2- London

3- Shanghai

4- Madrid

5- Daegu
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Old April 9th, 2013, 01:38 AM   #110
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Quote:
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English ain't Scotland's first language, so might this anull your query? Also, "non-American nations" is mystifying . . .
1. 'English speaking non-American nations', i.e. nations where English is the first language that aren't America, i.e. aren't the U.S.

2. What language is Scotland's language if not English?

3. Have you read the last few posts about subway?
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Old April 9th, 2013, 12:16 PM   #111
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Quote:
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English ain't Scotland's first language, so might this anull your query? Also, "non-American nations" is mystifying . . .
Well, this is just a bit of a stupid post.

English was widely used in Scotland, and has been for hundreds of years. The industrialised areas of Scotland (ie the central area) was dominantly English speaking. Ever hear of the Scottish Enlightenment?

Also, you missed out the "ENGLISH SPEAKING non-American nations" part. Meaning countries like Canada, Britain, Australia, New Zealand etc. etc.

Does it hurt to be confused all the time, trainrover?
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Old April 9th, 2013, 12:34 PM   #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abinash89 View Post
Delhi metro

Hyderabad metro

Kochi metro

Mumbai metro

Bangalore metro
Haha the Bangalore metro sign looks like a mothercare logo!
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Old April 9th, 2013, 12:40 PM   #113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WB2010 View Post
I think that my homecity - Warsaw - has one of the best metro logos, simple and easily understandable. Take a look:


It looks like a cheap supermarket logo. After finding this thread and going through them all I'm just so astonished to see the awful mistakes the planners and designers have come up with.
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Old April 10th, 2013, 12:44 AM   #114
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Quote:
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After finding this thread and going through them all I'm just so astonished to see the awful mistakes the planners and designers have come up with.
Do you have more examples of what you mean?

I agree with the "supermarket", BTW.
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Old April 10th, 2013, 03:24 AM   #115
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Errrr oops...

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Old April 12th, 2013, 05:19 PM   #116
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Errrr oops...

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Old April 13th, 2013, 05:20 PM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
Well, this is just a bit of a stupid post.

English was widely used in Scotland, and has been for hundreds of years. The industrialised areas of Scotland (ie the central area) was dominantly English speaking. Ever hear of the Scottish Enlightenment?

Also, you missed out the "ENGLISH SPEAKING non-American nations" part. Meaning countries like Canada, Britain, Australia, New Zealand etc. etc.

Does it hurt to be confused all the time, trainrover?
Any differences between 'proper' Scottish and English English are limited to a few ''scottishisms'', i.e saying 'outwith' instead of 'out of', or the use of the word 'Janitor', instead of 'Caretaker' in England, or even 'Pinkie' instead of 'Little finger'. Both of those last two are common in the USA.

I can't think of any other examples off the top of my head, but older people in Scotland and Northern England still use old fashioned words for things which have since become the norm in American English, this is the main reason for 'Subway' still being in use in Glasgow. Many younger people born in the 80s and 90s still refer to the Subway as the 'Underground'. Incidentally, many new-Glaswegians, who weren't born here, tend to refer to it as the 'Tube', like in London, but most Glaswegians would quickly correct them!

Anyway, I'll stop boring everyone with this linguistic nonsense. We're here to share good bits of graphic design and street furniture!
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Old July 31st, 2013, 03:33 PM   #118
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I like the the logo of the Antwerp underground tram.

It looks like the letter "T" and maybe a bit like an inverted "M" and at the same time reminds of a railtrack running in a tunnel.

source: urbanrail.net

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 12:51 AM   #119
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Maybe it looks like the letter T because it's a premetro network meaning trams are carrying the passengers? Would be a pretty clever logo if so!
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 12:55 AM   #120
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Brussels is wonderfully minimalistic. (Also used in Charleroi)
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