daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 11th, 2010, 02:41 PM   #1
Obelixx
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,890
Likes (Received): 83

MISC | Power Supply to your Country's Railway

The railway power supply stems for railway systems can be sometimes very interesting. For example in counties using single phase AC which has not the same frequency than that of the public power grid often operate a seperate power grid. So Germany and Austria have a 110 kV-single phase AC grid for railways, Switzerland such of 132 kV and 66 kV. In some parts of Scandinavia also such grids exist.

See also

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...nd_Switzerland
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electri...ways_in_Norway
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electri...ways_in_Sweden
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traction_power_network
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/25_Hz_P...mission_System
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariazellerbahn
Obelixx no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 13th, 2010, 08:59 PM   #2
urbanfan89
Registered User
 
urbanfan89's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,502
Likes (Received): 67

In Canada...none. At all.
urbanfan89 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 15th, 2010, 03:42 AM   #3
future.architect
Far East London
 
future.architect's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,799
Likes (Received): 2029

it is prety much accepted that overhead wires energised at 25,000 volts ac is the 'standard' system for heavy railways. it is better, more efficiant but also more expensive system than 3rd rail systems. in the UK, 25k overhead is standard apart from some 2 areas of 750dc 3rd rail around south london and liverpool.
future.architect no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 15th, 2010, 11:57 PM   #4
Obelixx
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1,890
Likes (Received): 83

The usage of a third rail for overland railways is in my opinion a large security problem!
Obelixx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2010, 12:38 AM   #5
WatcherZero
Registered User
 
WatcherZero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 19,590

Only if people piss on it...
WatcherZero no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2010, 05:23 PM   #6
bluemeansgo
Registered User
 
bluemeansgo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 451
Likes (Received): 124

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanfan89 View Post
In Canada...none. At all.
What are you talking about? Almost every train in Canada is electric. Electricity powers the engines... the electricity is generated by an onboard diesel motor.
bluemeansgo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 21st, 2010, 04:16 PM   #7
NiGhtPiSH
Sofia Hardcore
 
NiGhtPiSH's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sofia
Posts: 854
Likes (Received): 757

In Bulgaria we use the standard 25 kV / 50 Hz electrification for our lines and nearly all main lines are electrified.
__________________
A major source of objection to a free economy is precisely that group thinks they ought to want. Underlying most arguments against the free market is a lack of belief in freedom itself.
NiGhtPiSH no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2010, 02:34 PM   #8
makita09
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,536
Likes (Received): 92

Quote:
Originally Posted by future.architect View Post
it is prety much accepted that overhead wires energised at 25,000 volts ac is the 'standard' system for heavy railways. it is better, more efficiant but also more expensive system than 3rd rail systems. in the UK, 25k overhead is standard apart from some 2 areas of 750dc 3rd rail around south london and liverpool.
And the 1500kv DC Newcastle metro overhead electrification.
__________________
"There is no problem so bad that you can't make it worse" - Chris Hadfield
makita09 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 24th, 2010, 02:11 AM   #9
MarcVD
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Brussels
Posts: 1,069
Likes (Received): 192

Belgium is mainly 3 kV DC - the first wires have been installed in 1935
between Brussels and Antwerp, and at that time, this was the best
electrification technology available. There are a few lines electrified with
the 25 kV 50 Hz system - four high-speed lines, and two lines recently
put under wires, for which the 3 kV DC system would not have been
economically feasible. That makes the belgian network almost totally
electrified, with only 5 lines remaining with diesel traction.

Technically, all belgian railways AC to DC substations are fed by the national
power grid with aerial or underground 3-phase lines, usually 70 kV. AC to
AC substations are fed by one phase only. AC to DC rectification is all done
with semiconductors now, all old systems (rotating groups, a.s.o.) having
disappeared. There is no railways-dedicated power grid, like it exists in
16.7 Hz territory. All substations and switching equipment is remote-controlled, there are no manned installations.

Contact line is of the catenary type everywhere on the main line, trolley
type contact line still existing only in some sidings. DC catenary uses four
wires, AC one uses two wires only. Supports are of the frame type, two
masts supporting one beam that spans both tracks.

Energy bills have increased by a factor 4 in the last 10 years. More trains,
more power per train, raising prices of the energy unit cost, all of that
contributed to that increase. Railway management hasn't figured out how
to deal with that problem yet.
MarcVD no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 24th, 2010, 03:14 AM   #10
future.architect
Far East London
 
future.architect's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 6,799
Likes (Received): 2029

Quote:
Originally Posted by makita09 View Post
And the 1500kv DC Newcastle metro overhead electrification.
but that is not part of the national rail network. if i mentioned newcastle then i would have had to mention london underground and all of the tram systems in the uk and i did not feel this would be relevant to the thread.
future.architect no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 26th, 2010, 07:30 AM   #11
invincible
Lurker
 
invincible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 3,804
Likes (Received): 523

Victoria and NSW use 1500 V DC. These networks were electrified 90-100 years ago when this standard was a lot more common. Queensland and Western Australia introduced electrification muct later and use 25kV AC.

Melbourne's trams use 600 V DC which is a short of the standard 750 V used around the world, but trams designed for 750V still work on the system.
invincible no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 26th, 2010, 10:54 AM   #12
makita09
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,536
Likes (Received): 92

Some parts of the DC network in the UK used to be 600v or thereabouts in the same way. The line out of Waterloo as far as Wimbledon or somewhere like that, I'm not sure if that is still the case but the normal 750v trains operated fine over that section, presumably with less power though.
makita09 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 26th, 2015, 07:56 AM   #13
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

Various Voltages used for the New York City Region
New York
Metro North
750 Bottom Contact 3rd Rail
-Hudson Line : Mott Haven to Croton Harmon
-Harlem Line : Grand Central to Southeast
-New Haven Line : Woodlawn to Pelham

12.5 kV/60 Hz Overhead Catenary

-New Haven Line : Pelham to New Haven
-New Canaan Branch : Stamford to New Canaan

Proposed Lines
Danbury Branch : South Norwalk to New Milford
25kV/60Hz Overhead Catenary
Hell Gate line : Penn Station to New Rochelle
New Haven Line Upgrade


New York
Long Island Railroad
750 Top Contact 3rd Rail
-Atlantic Branch
-Long Beach Branch
-West Hempstead Branch
-Ronkonkoma Branch
-Babylon Branch
-Port Washington Branch
-Far Rockaway Branch
-Hempstead Branch
-Port Jefferson Branch : Hicksville to Huntington

Proposed Lines
East Side Access to Grand Central

New Jersey
New Jersey Transit
12.5kV/25Hz Overhead Catenary
North Jersey Coast Line : Rahway to South Amboy
Northeast Corridor line : New York to Trenton
25kV/60Hz Overhead Catenary
North Jersey Coast Line : South Amboy to Long Branch
Morristown Line : Hoboken to Dover
Montclair Line : Newark to Montclair State University
Gladstone Branch : Summit to Gladstone
Proposed Lines
Northeast Corridor line : Trenton to New York
Jamesburg Branch : Monmouth Junction to Farmingdale

Red Bank Branch : Lakehurst to Red Bank
South Amboy Branch : South Amboy to Bordentown


Connecticut
Regional Rail
25kV/60Hz Overhead Catenary
Shore Line East : New Haven to New London
Proposed Lines
Knowledge Corridor : New Haven to Springfield/Brattleboro
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 26th, 2015, 08:59 AM   #14
M-NL
Mixed-mode traveller
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,156
Likes (Received): 274

I've read somewhere that the only reason 12.5 kV AC is still used is because there are low clearance areas that do not have sufficient safety distance for 25 kV AC. Is that true?

Are there plans to switch the 25 Hz lines to 60 Hz (either at 12.5 kV or 25 kV), because generating power at a different frequency takes extra effort?
__________________
Public transport: Mode of transport that takes to much time to take you from the place you're not currently located, to the place you didn't want to go to, at a time that doesn't really suit you.
M-NL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 26th, 2015, 09:18 AM   #15
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,684
Likes (Received): 17033

Quote:
Originally Posted by M-NL View Post
I've read somewhere that the only reason 12.5 kV AC is still used is because there are low clearance areas that do not have sufficient safety distance for 25 kV AC. Is that true?

Are there plans to switch the 25 Hz lines to 60 Hz (either at 12.5 kV or 25 kV), because generating power at a different frequency takes extra effort?
The clearance on some of the Philly lines is quite low along with the New Haven Line.. However I know New Jersey Transit has some low bridges on its 25kV/60Hz network. Eventually Amtrak would like to have the entire Northeast Corridor at 25kV/60Hz including the New Haven Line. Which would allow for NJT to complete its 25kV/60Hz network. I'm not sure about SEPTA , I know Amtrak wants the Keystone Corridor to be upgraded to 25kV/60Hz sometime down the road. But the rest of the SEPTA Network might remain at 12.5kV/25Hz. Some of the newer and upgraded lines in Massachusetts and Connecticut will be powered at 25kV/60Hz.

__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium