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Old June 2nd, 2010, 02:59 AM   #81
Trainviationfanatica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TWK90 View Post
According to last year's Chinese language newspaper...

Maximum operation speed : 140 km/h
Maximum design speed : 160 km/h
Passenger capacity : 350
Length : 138 m (6 car train)
Weight : 231.8 tons
Carriage dimensions
Length : 22.95 m
Width : 2.75 m
Height : 4 m

This is not a tilting train.
Damn!! Bloody KTM!! They never upgrade the Singapore-Malaysia system!!!!
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 08:49 AM   #82
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Quote:
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It's clear that my own "better" be too remote a concept for you too
A railroad needs to go from somewhere to somewhere. If it's built to serve an industry, such as a mine, fine. If it's built to link some of the more important towns in the area, fine. But if what you're suggesting is that we build railroads instead of roads straight into the bush--why? There's no point in it! The traffic you'd be getting is not worth the expense and the upkeep needed for a railroad! There has to be a source of traffic of some sort to justify the expense of laying a railroad, any railroad, and if that traffic is just some dude living in a trailer 30 kilometers from the nearest major road, then your proposal is little more than a glorified PRT. The bush needs the hardiest equipment imaginable. I'm not denying that railroad equipment isn't hardy--but I fail to see the need for a railroad to service the bush, especially when the paths and tracks in such a landscape do tend to shift, sometimes without warning, and a railroad, like any form of road, depends on being a fairly permanent transitway...I'm sorry, but I just don't see how what you're suggesting is a good idea. Like I said, drive the train tracks to a fairly well-populated railhead and/or the spurs emanating from it to nearby industries, a last bastion, if you like, of civilization; you can just use a 4x4 or a dog sled or something that is hardy, easily maintainable, and doesn't have to depend on a fixed guideway from there on out. I like to take up my positions on the social economics of the matter, and there are situations where I don't see how the rail line can be economically viable.

That said, there are still plenty of places up in the American far north where a rail line is viable but does not exist: for instance, one from the CN railhead in upper British Columbia through Whitehorse to the ARR railhead in Fairbanks might well be viable, especially if there are industries that the railroad can serve. The same for the railhead on the south side of the Great Slave Lake. Why doesn't it go all the way to Yellowknife? If the industries up near the Mackenzie Delta need more than what the winter roads can provide for--which may well soon be the case--then a very real case can be made for driving a railroad up there, too. But when we're dealing with the edge of civilization, we're also dealing with the fringe of where railroads can be economically viable--and if the line ain't viable, there ain't no point in building it.
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Old June 2nd, 2010, 10:21 PM   #83
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Roads risk bringing in business whilst tracks would better serve at keeping it out, which has been my point subsequent to (still) wishing to learn what, transport-wise, a 1-metre guage railway could not do that --say-- an 18-wheeler can.

Your proposed road network would cost far more than some adaptation of the --say-- 1-metre gauge railway.
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Old June 3rd, 2010, 05:30 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
It now reaches 160 km/h!






The above is from another taken from another thread: Malaysia Railway Development News.
This is really good news.
Is this a new world record for metre gauge trains?
I thought it is.
The other narrow gauge speed records achieved in South Africa and Queensland were cape gauge.
So, good news not only for Malaysia, but also for the whole 95000km of metre gauge world in various countries.
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Old July 31st, 2010, 03:52 AM   #85
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There was a news article recently that China is going to help Thailand to build a HST from north to south. Even if this is not the 350km/h full fledge HST, will this trigger the start of the eventual conversion of the Thai metre gauge to standard gauge? Is this happen, this may trigger the rethink of the entire metre gauge network of the M'sia, Vietnam, etc.
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Old July 31st, 2010, 02:22 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
1676 - 5ft6in in India (not in Spain)
1600 - 5ft3in South America (and maybe Ireland, Australia will convert its lines)
1524 - 5ft in Russia and nearby countries
1435 - 4 ft 8,5 in everywhere
1067 - 3ft6in Southern part of Africa, Japan, Taiwan
1000 - 3 ft 3+3/8 in everywhere

And non-standard gauges in metro lines (900-950-1200-1372-1495-1588-...).
Count in all turist lines and factory lines, in my country (Poland) we have standard gauge network + one line of Russian broad gauge, and few dozens of narrow gauge railways that operate turist trains, few dozens of factories that have their own tracks, and few forest railways,. from 1980ties to 2000 we had lots of lines geting closed, but now those old lines are geting new life. So they won't disapear. We have 4 types of narrow gauge, 600mm, 750mm, 785mm and 1000mm +mines use underground 500mm.
Typical narrow gauge turist train:
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Old August 30th, 2010, 06:39 PM   #87
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Sorry for the size

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Old August 30th, 2010, 10:14 PM   #88
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A few remarks about this map coming to mind:

- France has 5 metre-gauge lines, and spanish gauge in 3 border stations ;
- Lybia has no railway at all, if I'm not mistaken
- Tunisia also has some metre-gauge lines
- Does Durango-Silverton count ? ;-)
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Old August 31st, 2010, 12:39 AM   #89
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Russian railway company RZhD is building railways in Lybia

























link
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Old August 31st, 2010, 05:27 AM   #90
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Standard gauge (1435 mm) or broad gauge (1520 mm)?

Mike
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Old August 31st, 2010, 06:17 AM   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
Roads risk bringing in business whilst tracks would better serve at keeping it out, which has been my point subsequent to (still) wishing to learn what, transport-wise, a 1-metre guage railway could not do that --say-- an 18-wheeler can.

Your proposed road network would cost far more than some adaptation of the --say-- 1-metre gauge railway.
I still fail to see how. A gravel road is nothing more than a railbed without rails. Not putting the rails on the railbed results in a cheaper end-product.

How exactly does a railroad keep business out? Any mode of transportation is going to bring business in to such a remote area.

I'm all for more railroads, but I'm sorry, this seems to be going a step too far. The expenses involved with creating an maintaining a rail line in such terrain far outweigh the economic benefits. Like I said, you need to have an economic source to make a railroad viable. Large-scale logging operations did it once; mines still do. If you want to drive a railroad through to some godforsaken hellhole in the middle of Nunavut--discover a mineral lode there!
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Old August 31st, 2010, 06:30 AM   #92
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Standard gauge (1435 mm) or broad gauge (1520 mm)?

Mike
1435, of cource, since everybody else around them is using it. They want to connect nothern Africas railroads together as far as I know.
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Old August 31st, 2010, 09:00 AM   #93
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From the map, why does it look like South and Central America decided to split themselves up into alternating gauges so that their networks can't link up?
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Old August 31st, 2010, 11:15 AM   #94
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When railway in Africa were built during colonisation each (european) country choose a different gauge, and built lines to connect inland resources with the sea, and not the various regions with each other. In Southern America railways have certainly a similar origin.
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Old August 31st, 2010, 07:19 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
When railway in Africa were built during colonisation each (european) country choose a different gauge, and built lines to connect inland resources with the sea, and not the various regions with each other. In Southern America railways have certainly a similar origin.
Railroads in North America were first developed in much that same way, but because they were starting to tie various areas together, about the time of the USA Civil War and within a decade or two after, they were all standardized on track gauge (1435 mm), coupling/braking standards and even timekeeping.

I'd love to see the rest of the Americas do likewise.

Mike
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Old August 31st, 2010, 07:24 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by lanolama View Post
1435, of cource, since everybody else around them is using it. They want to connect nothern Africas railroads together as far as I know.
Thanx!

Mike
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Old August 31st, 2010, 11:41 PM   #97
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Originally Posted by lanolama View Post
Russian railway company RZhD is building railways in Lybia
Interesting. Any map of the routes in construction / in project ?

TIA,
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Old September 1st, 2010, 12:54 AM   #98
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Interesting. Any map of the routes in construction / in project ?

TIA,

Just a small map I found on Rzhdinter's Lybia-project page.



But we can compair it with a map of Lybia.






And few other small photos.









And here what wikipedia says:

There is a plan for an 3170 km 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) (standard gauge) network.[1] A line parallel to the coast will eventually form part of a North African link between Tunisia and Egypt. The section from the border with Tunisia at Ras Ejder, then via Tripoli to Sirt is currently under construction and is planned to open in 2009. Google Earth reveals (2007-9) progress with the trackbed. China Railway Construction Corporation has contracts to start work in June 2008 on a 352 km route between Sirt and Al Khums, to be finished by 2013.[3] The east-west line will be double track. Google Earth 2009 images show renewed progress with the earthworks, including concrete bridges, that have seen no attention since 2004

A second line will run 800 km from iron ore deposits at Wadi Shati near Sebha to the steel works and port at Misurata from 2012.[3]

A third line will run 554 km from Sirt to Benghazi in the East. In October 2007, RZD submitted a feasibility study for the project, and in 2008 signed a contract to begin construction, which was planned to take 4 years to complete.[4] Work began on 30 August 2008.[5] In August 2010, RZD awarded Ansaldo STS and SELEX Communications a contract to install signalling, telecoms, power, security and ticketing systems which is expected to take three years. Ansaldo STS and SELEX Communications are also working on signalling on new lines between Surt and the Tunisian border, and the route to Sabha.[6]

A trans-Saharan line is also planned, running south to Niger.
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Old September 1st, 2010, 01:08 AM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huhu View Post
From the map, why does it look like South and Central America decided to split themselves up into alternating gauges so that their networks can't link up?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
When railway in Africa were built during colonisation each (european) country choose a different gauge, and built lines to connect inland resources with the sea, and not the various regions with each other. In Southern America railways have certainly a similar origin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
Railroads in North America were first developed in much that same way, but because they were starting to tie various areas together, about the time of the USA Civil War and within a decade or two after, they were all standardized on track gauge (1435 mm), coupling/braking standards and even timekeeping.

I'd love to see the rest of the Americas do likewise.

Mike

610mm = 2 foot railways were used wth hand pushed wagons ... small "portable" stretches of railways could be carried by the armies and deployed in the field to create suply lines ... a lot of surplus equipment wasavailable after WWI ended and a lot of industrial and farming/logging railroads used that equipment (in this category of mostly rural and industrial railways we can include every gauge from 600mm to 760mm)

914mm = american standard
1000mm = european metric standard
1067mm = british standard

Indian gauge = 1676mm was first used in scotland ... then it was used in CANADA and USA (um untill 1873/1876 when those wer converted to standard) and only then used in all other british colonies to built main lines specially in india where the wider gauge could acomodate the larger fireboxes needed to pull trains up long and steep gradients so they choose the scotish broad gauge (a lot of the locomotive and rail equipment factories were located in scotland)

Italian gauges = italian railways measured their gauge from the middle of the rails so their "standard" 1500mm 1000mm and 750mm became 1445mm , 950mm and 700mm in the more common denominations

Irish Gauge = the railways in ireland had 3 different gauges (1880mm , 1420mm and 1575mm) and by 1846 the board of trade someone decided to set for 1600mm.

Australia = they decided to go with "standard" but isntead adopted 1600mm (with NSW going backto 1435) and Queensland wen't "el cheapo" and choose capegauge (1067mm)

Iberian Gauge = portugal used 1445mm and spain used 1672mm (6 castillian feet) ... portugal then made an half-assed conversion (removing the inner spikes/screws placing the rails outside of the old outer screw and then using the other screws to bolt the rails in the outside) and that ended up being 1664mm ... more recently both countries railways changed their patterns to a common 1668mm gauge ... also very common is the 1000mm metregauge and the 1435mm (in urban railways , metro, trams and HSL).

Russian "standard" gauge = 1524mm (5 foot) was choosed bbecause it was widely used in SOUTHERN UNITED STATES at that time (rounded to 1520mm in the 1960's)

British gauge (also known as Stephenson/UIC/standard gauge) = the first railway locomotives that Stephenson built were for the 1435mm Liverpool-Manchester ... in that area the colieries used a 1422mm gauge and that 1435mm value it was wide enough to allow wagons to pick up speed ... as eh became famous he built a lot of other railways (mostly with gauges betweeen 1422mm and 1448mm, the wider the gauge the bigger the toleran~ce sicne all used th saime veichle weel spacing of 1435mm(only old horsedrawnmining carts used 1422m.
(sidenote: most common in some other mining areas in the uk were 4foot/1219mm and 5foot/1524mm so any of them could became standard, only Stephensons lead 8-1 in mileage made the choice for 1435mm so obvious to everyone , even Brunnell)
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Old September 1st, 2010, 04:37 AM   #100
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Interesting. I guess that explains why Argentina and Chile use "Indian Gauge" because it was almost the same as the old Spanish gauge?

It's still curious as to why Peru and Venezuela use Standard Gauge, Ecuador uses Cape Gauge, Bolivia uses Metre Gauge, and Colombia uses Italian Gauge. These countries are all neighbours.
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