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Old December 27th, 2010, 08:12 PM   #121
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Yes, but this gauge is only used with Decauville railways, that is, for mines, industries, and so on. There are no interurban/long distance railways with gauge smaller than 750 mm (or, if they exist, they aren't much).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decauville
Always ready for a technical answer.

We should open a thread like : Ask the Tubeman

A thread olny dedicated to technical questions.
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Old December 27th, 2010, 08:33 PM   #122
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Namibia had 600 mm gauge railway between Swakopmund and Grootfontein, almost 600 km long. The longest at that gauge. It was regauged to 1067 mm in 1061.
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Old December 28th, 2010, 04:46 AM   #123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
Is this experiment purpose-built test track or a line in service?
Sorry because the late answer, i have lossed this thread for long time, i am not sure, but imho it's a line in service.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 08:39 AM   #124
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Breitspurbahn

Quote:
Originally Posted by tuckerbox View Post
What is the widest Gauge in the World?
I saw somewhere that the Giant German Rail Gun was 7 feet Gauge.
It ran on two tracks.
What is the smallest?
Giant German Rail Gun was 3000mm, but not ever built.
http://www.alternatehistory.com/disc...ad.php?t=69415
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Breits...03220083067265
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Breits...78542958829456
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=464566
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breitspurbahn

The smallest ridable was 260mm.
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1676mm for Afghanistan, 1435mm for Iceland.

Last edited by nagara373; February 13th, 2011 at 07:43 AM.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 10:12 AM   #125
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The smallest trains that can carry people are probably the IV-scale (1 : 8) models, 127 mm gauge.

The smallest trains are probably some models smaller than Z-scale (1 : 220), 6,5 mm gauge. Even if they can't carry people they still have the basic characteristics of a railway (metal wheels on metal rails, wheels with classical rail profile, small Vignole rails, functioning couplings between vehicles, ...).
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Old January 7th, 2011, 06:47 PM   #126
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Quote:
Taiwan Railway Administration orders tilting trains

06 January 2011


TAIWAN: Japanese suppliers Sumitomo Corp and Nippon Sharyo confirmed on January 6 that they had signed a NT$106bn contract to supply Taiwan Railway Administration with 17 inter-city tilting trainsets capable of operation at 150 km/h.


Under the deal agreed on December 31, the eight-car EMUs are due to be delivered in 2012-14 for use on Taroko Express services between Taipei and Hualien on TRA's 1 067 mm gauge east coast route. The aluminium-bodied trains will feature wheelchair access, luggage and bicycle spaces and onboard vending machines.

The east coast line was electrified at 25 kV 60 Hz in 2003, and TRA introduced its first tilting trains in April 2007, helping to shorten journey times and making rail more competitive with the island's improved roads.

TRA acquired an initial build of six eight-car tilting trainsets from Marubeni and Hitachi to launch the Taroko Express services. The railway had planned to exercise an option for a further 48 vehicles in 2009, but called new tenders after it failed to agree terms with the suppliers because of changing exchange rates. Three rounds of bidding were held in the new competition, but most bidders were reportedly unable to meet TRA's requirements in terms of price and delivery schedule.
http://www.railwaygazette.com/nc/new...ng-trains.html
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Old January 17th, 2011, 04:59 AM   #127
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South Africa uses the Cape Gauge, 1067mm, but the new Gautrain network, a suburban network in the Gauteng province (around Johannesburg) is built to 1435mm, Standard gauage. This is because acquiring rolling stock is cheaper and easier to buy from European manufacturers. The trains currently used are Bombardier Electrostar (with a beefed up air conditioning system).

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Old February 11th, 2011, 07:44 AM   #128
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Suggestions of broad gauge rail networks

US and Canada should be converted from 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge to 5 ft 6 in (1,676 mm) Indian broad gauge and 25kV AC electrification before they have their high-speed trains, necessary.

Afghan networks should be 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Indian broad gauge with very large loading gauge and long curve radii not 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) standard gauge for long-distance lines (freight lines and high-speed lines) because breaks-of-gauge in the mountainous area (southern Afghanistan) will restrict capacity and Afghan notworks should be in the Russia-India rail links.


1. Proposal for Afghanistan

Detail of Afghan high-speed/freight rail network:
Track gauge: 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Indian broad gauge (1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) Russian gauge on Hayratan - Mazar-i-Sharif)
Number of tracks: at least 2
Electrification system: 25kV AC overhead lines
Minimum radius: 7,400m
Maximum gradient: 3.5% (1.2% on Hayratan - Mazar-i-Sharif)
Loading gauge: 4,240mm wide and 6,150mm high
Platform height: 200mm (8 inches)
Minimum platform length: 1,067m (3,500ft)
Sleeper type: concrete
Rail profile: 75kg/m or 155lb/yd
Line 1: Chaman - Kandahar - Herat - Serhetabat
Line 2: Khyber Pass - Jalalabad - Kabul - Kandahar
Line 3: Herat - Mazar-i-Sharif
Line 4: Kabul - Kunduz - Sherkhan Bandar
Line 5: Mazar-i-Sharif - Kunduz
Line 6: Kabul - Mazar-i-Sharif (tunnel route)
Line 7: Kunduz - eastern Tajikistan
Right-/ left hand running: Right-hand running

Breaks-of-gauge points:
Serhetabat (Turkmenistan): 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) / 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
Towraghondi: 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) / 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) (Only for the terminal of the 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) line)
Mazar-i-Sharif: 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) / 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
Sherkhan Bandar: 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) / 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
Herat: 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) / 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in)


2. Proposal for North America

Detail of Bering Strait Tunnel (TKM-World Link) network:
Track gauge: 1,520 mm (4 ft 11 5⁄6 in) Russian gauge, 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Indian broad gauge and 1,829 mm (6 ft)
Number of tracks: at least 2
Electrification system: 25kV AC overhead lines
Minimum radius: 7,400m
Maximum gradient: 2% (Russian side), 3.5% (American side)
Loading gauge: 4,240mm wide and 6,150mm high
Platform height: 200mm (8 inches)
Minimum platform length: 1,067m (3,500ft)
Sleeper type: concrete
Rail profile: 75kg/m or 155lb/yd
Line 1: Yakutsk - (Tunnel) - Fair Banks - Fort Nelson
Line 2: Komsolsk-on-Amur - Okhotsk - Magadan - (Tunnel)
Line 3: Norilsk - (Tunnel)
Line 4: Edmonton - Calgary - Shelby - Salt Lake City
Line 5: Krasnoyarsk - Yakutsk
Right-/ left hand running: Right-hand running

Detail of proposed North American rail network (for USA and Canada):
Track gauge: 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Indian broad gauge
Number of tracks: at least 2
Electrification system: 25kV AC overhead lines
Loading gauge: 4,100mm wide and 6,150mm high
Platform height: 200mm (8 inches)
Minimum platform length: 915m (3,000ft)
Sleeper type: concrete
Right-/ left hand running: Right-hand running


3. Breitspurbahn

3,000 mm (9 ft 10 1⁄8 in) broad-gauge railway has been proposed.

Links:
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/blo...ory/dieselpunk
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/blo...elpunk/page-2/
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/blo...-super-trains/
http://storeagemsw.files.wordpress.c.../dfzthrthr.jpg
http://storeagemsw.files.wordpress.c...vrgrgrgeft.jpg
http://storeagemsw.files.wordpress.c...328large29.jpg
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/blo...ahn-more-pics/
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/img...ehltergfy6.jpg
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/img.../broad1oq6.jpg
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/img.../breit4sm7.jpg
http://nazidieselpunk.devhub.com/img...rbahn03vt7.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/3000.html
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/zukunft.html
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/modell.html
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/barnes1.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/barnes3.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/barnes4.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/breit1.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/breit3.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/breit4.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/museum1.jpg
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/lok.gif
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/wagen.gif
http://www.breitspurbahn.de/images/container.gif
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...tspurbahn1.JPG
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/Breitspurbahn.html
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/Breitspurbahn.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/B...ld%2002_01.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/B...ld%2004_01.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/B...dler%20(1).jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/B...dler%20(2).jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/B...2001%20(1).jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/B...2001%20(2).jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/D...nellzuglok.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/G...-Transport.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/Kinowagen.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/O...tspurbahn).jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/S...202.Klasse.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/Schlusswagen.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/S....%20Klasse.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/S...201.Klasse.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/S...202.Klasse.jpg
http://www.3k-modellbau.com/images/S...202.Klasse.jpg
http://www.csu-lichtenhof.de/bhf_m2.jpg
http://www.epilog.de/Lexikon/B/Breitspureisenbahn.htm
http://www.epilog.de/Lexikon/B/_Bild...bahn_f1780.jpg
http://www.epilog.de/Lexikon/B/_Bild...bahn_f1781.jpg
http://www.epilog.de/Lexikon/B/_Bild...bahn_f1782.jpg
http://www.epilog.de/Lexikon/B/_Bild...bahn_f1783.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB.../b1fha750.html
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...train_X3_b.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...rtrain_4_b.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...train_2_bb.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...ertrain_X4.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...train_15_1.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...train_15_3.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...rain_10_bb.jpg
http://inri.client.jp/hexagon/floorB...train_14_b.jpg
http://photos.friendster.com/photos/...340833337l.jpg
http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/5029/maphd5.jpg
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1676mm for Afghanistan, 1435mm for Iceland.

Last edited by nagara373; February 13th, 2011 at 07:44 AM.
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Old February 11th, 2011, 07:55 AM   #129
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addition

addition:

Rail networks in USA and Canada gauge conversion from 1435mm to 1676mm, necessary.

Many narrow gauge railways are eventually killed by cars.

Rail networks in Southeast Asia, Africa, Latin America (except Argentina and Chile) and Australia gauge conversion to 1435mm, necessary.

Rail networks in Hokkaido (Japan) gauge conversion from 1067mm to 1435mm, necessary.

Proposed rail networks by track gauge:

1676mm (Indian gauge):
1. India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, (proposed) Afghanistan, (proposed) eastern Tajikistan
2. (all proposed) northeast Russia, Bering Strait Tunnel, Alaska, Canada, the Continental United States
3. Argentina, Chile

1520(1524)mm (Russian gauge):
CIS states, Baltic States, Finland, Mongolia, (proposed) extend to Europe, (proposed) extend to Iran/Syria/Dubai, (proposed) extend to Scandinavia, (proposed) extend to Fairbanks (Alaska) including Bering Strait Tunnel

1435mm (standard gauge):
1. Europe, Iran, Middle East, (proposed) Africa, (proposed) Spain/Portugal, (proposed) Gibraltar Tunnel
2. China, Korea, Japan (Shinkansen), (proposed) Southeast Asia
3. Mexico, (proposed) Central America, Panama, (proposed) from Colombia through Peru to Bolivia/Paraguay, (proposed) from Venezuela through Brazil to Uruguay (USA and Canada to be converted to 1676mm, necessary)
4. Australia
5. (proposed) Iceland

Narrower gauges should be short-distane lines only.

Gauge names:
3000mm: Nazi broad gauge (Breitspurbahn)
2140(2134)mm: Brunel's broad gauge
1829mm: Bering gauge
1676mm: Indian gauge (Provincial gauge)
1668mm: Iberian gauge
1600mm: Victorian broad gauge (Irish gauge)
1588(1581)mm: Pennsylvanian Trolley gauge
1520(1524)mm: Russian gauge
1485mm: Swedish Ohio gauge
1473mm: Ohio gauge
1460mm: Norwegian Ohio gauge
1435mm: Stadard gauge
1422mm: Danish gauge
1372mm: Scotch gauge
1219mm: Intermediate gauge
1188mm: Swedish medium gauge
1093mm: Swedish Cape gauge
1067mm: Cape gauge (Japanese gauge)
1000mm: metre gauge
950mm: Italian metre gauge
912(914)mm: Borjomian narrow gauge
891mm: Swedish narrow gauge
760(762)mm: Bosnian gauge
600mm: Decauville gauge
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1676mm for Afghanistan, 1435mm for Iceland.

Last edited by nagara373; February 13th, 2011 at 07:44 AM.
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Old February 11th, 2011, 09:12 AM   #130
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the myths of gauges

The myths of gauges:

1. The metre gauge and another similar gauge bonus standard gauge.
2. 2 gauges similar standard gauge bonus Indian broad gauge.
3. Russian gauge and another similar gauge bonus Brunel's broad gauge.

Examples:
914mm+1000mm: bonus 1435mm
1000mm+1067mm: bonus 1435mm
1219mm+1372mm: bonus 1676mm
1245mm+1435mm: bonus 1676mm
1435mm+1520(1524)mm: bonus 2140(2134)mm
1520(1524)mm+1676mm: bonus 2140(2134)mm
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Old February 11th, 2011, 09:49 AM   #131
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huh? 意味不明...
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Old February 11th, 2011, 10:20 AM   #132
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+1
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Old December 2nd, 2011, 07:12 PM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trainrover View Post

-- formerly NR, subsequently CNR's lone narrow gauge, Island of Newfoundland, shut 1988
narrator's humourous
..
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hee hee
.

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Old December 3rd, 2011, 09:45 AM   #134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nagara373 View Post
addition:

Rail networks in USA and Canada gauge conversion from 1435mm to 1676mm, necessary.
Why is this "necessary"? This is a crazy idea.

Quote:
Many narrow gauge railways are eventually killed by cars.
It's not the gauge that determines success. There are quite a few very successful narrow gauge network. Have a look in Japan...
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 09:55 AM   #135
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I don't see a point of converting freight railways in US to broad gauge.

However, I wish they had built the European high-speed network in a special gauge (like 2000mm) so that, in the future, high-performing tilting trains could be used to surpass the speed limits constrained by curve radii.

It would be cool to have a train zipping from Paris to Berlin at 420km/h, for instance.
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 11:28 AM   #136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
I don't see a point of converting freight railways in US to broad gauge.

However, I wish they had built the European high-speed network in a special gauge (like 2000mm) so that, in the future, high-performing tilting trains could be used to surpass the speed limits constrained by curve radii.

It would be cool to have a train zipping from Paris to Berlin at 420km/h, for instance.
Why would a broader gauge be necessary for the trains to tilt?
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 12:10 PM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
Why would a broader gauge be necessary for the trains to tilt?
Because a narrow gauge and high centre of gravity makes the trains easier to topple.

Japan made a stupid move in picking 1435 mm for Shinkansen. They did correctly recognize that narrow 1067 mm gauge has poor stability for high speeds and wide loading gauge - see the problems of Queensland with high speed 1067 mm - but why then 1435 mm? They were settling for a network incompatible with the existing 1067 mm anyway, and they were not going to connect with existing 1435 mm (Korea) anytime soon. They should have picked something broader to begin with, like 2134 mm.
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 02:12 PM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Because a narrow gauge and high centre of gravity makes the trains easier to topple.

Japan made a stupid move in picking 1435 mm for Shinkansen. They did correctly recognize that narrow 1067 mm gauge has poor stability for high speeds and wide loading gauge - see the problems of Queensland with high speed 1067 mm - but why then 1435 mm? They were settling for a network incompatible with the existing 1067 mm anyway, and they were not going to connect with existing 1435 mm (Korea) anytime soon. They should have picked something broader to begin with, like 2134 mm.
2134mm sounds preposterous.

And anyhow, the Tokaido Shinkansen is in itself quite circuitous for a high speed rail line. Imagine how much more right-of-way would need to be purchased just for your suggestion? Correct me if I am wrong but standard gauge was chosen so that they could fit the 2by3 seating arrangement that would quite greatly increase the capacity of train sets.

Also, don't forget that the loading gauge is equally, if not more, important, whcih is why shinkansen trains are wider than most other high speed trains.

Gauge does not have as much to with speed as we assume.
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 03:16 PM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
They were settling for a network incompatible with the existing 1067 mm anyway, and they were not going to connect with existing 1435 mm (Korea) anytime soon. They should have picked something broader to begin with, like 2134 mm.
Spain has made the opposite than you proposed, conventional rail has 1.668 mm and high speed rail has 1.435 mm. This is due to conect high speed rail with french network.

I'm not sure that a really big gauge is a real adventage. We should look for any study or something who talk about that. From metric gauge to ~1.5 meters gauge the difference is there, but I have my doubts in higher gauges. The lateral aceleration over the flange reduces in a geometric progresion, and you're getting maximum speeds that are limited by other systems and no by the wheel-rail interaction.

Also, the train's gravity center could be situated still nearer the track and active suspension isn't used in high speed yet to reach speeds that we still don't know in high speed current gauges.
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Old December 3rd, 2011, 04:28 PM   #140
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The broader the gauge the bigger the curves. For a line that is dead straight broader is better. In the case of the Tokaido Shinkansen you still see some tight curves that would cause even more problems with a high speed then they do now if the line was super broad gauge.

You also remember that an broader and wider train is heavier, an the weight is also a limiting factor in it's performance. Back in 1964 when the Shinkansen started operations the technology wasn't as advanced as it is now. Going even broader then the 1435mm might have caused to much problems back then. Right now it could be different, the 16 car 700n series set is 270 tons lighter then an original 16 car 0 series set. But since the line is already 1435 it wouldn't make sense to widen it.

Going faster on conventional track is also a challenge no matter what the track gauge is. All the problems in China with extreme high speed in regular service show that it might simply not be economical and practical to go faster then about 350 km/h with steel on steel.

And tilting trains won't change that, you see that the N700 now can reach 270 km/h on the parts of the Tokaido Shinkansen that previously only had a max speed of 255 km/h but it doesn't make it go faster at it's top speed on the parts of the line where it can reach it's max speed of 300 km/h. It's also not that strange that the N700-7000 that only runs on the newer Sanyo and Kyushu Shinkansen lines don't have the tilting system, simply because these lines are much more straight therefor it's not needed anymore.

Another thing is that the tilting on the N700 is still just a semi-active suspension system, it doesn't have active tilting like a Pendolino. Something that according to the railway industry is also not possible. The reason is that high speed trains need very stiff bogies for the stability of the trains at high speeds. While the bogies of tilting trains have to be more flexible to bend a bit in the tight curves. The Swiss railways wanted to buy this kind of trains with a max speed of 300 km/h and active tilt but the manufactures simply said it wasn't possible.


The best way to go faster then the current high speed trains is Maglev.
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