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Old October 24th, 2007, 07:14 PM   #61
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International air transport to grow 5.1 percent a year: IATA

PARIS, Oct 24, 2007 (AFP) - International air traffic will grow 5.1 percent a year between 2007 and 2011 with domestic flights up 5.3 percent, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) forecast on Wednesday

The organisation said that by 2011 the air transport industry will handle 2.75 billion passengers, 620 million more than last year, with freight rising to 36 million tonnes, some 7.5 million tonnes more than in 2006.

"The numbers clearly show that the world wants to fly. And it also needs to fly. Air transport is critical to the fabric of the global economy, playing a critical role in wealth generation and poverty reduction," Giovanni Bisignani, IATA's Director General and chief executive said in a statement.

The greatest growth will come in the Middle East, where the market is expected to grow by 6.8 percent annually, followed by the Asia Pacific region at 5.9 percent and Africa 5.6 percent, it said.

The growth will be lowest in the United States at 4.2 percent.

It said international passenger demand is expected to rise from 760 million passengers in 2006 to 980 million in 2011, slightly lower than the 7.4 percent recorded during 2002-2006, largely due to slightly slower global economic growth.

Domestic passenger demand is expected to grow from 1.37 billion passengers in 2006 to 1.77 billion in 2011, fuelled by expansion in the Indian and Chinese home markets.
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Old November 2nd, 2007, 06:37 PM   #62
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Global Airline Traffic Rose 8.2% In Sept From Yr Ago - IATA
2 November 2007

LONDON (Dow Jones)--International scheduled airline passenger traffic increased 8.2% in September compared to a year earlier, trade group The International Air Transport Association said Friday.

IATA measures traffic in revenue passenger kilometers, or RPKs, which factor in how far passengers are flown.

During the month, Latin American airlines had the strongest RPK growth, with a 24.8% jump with the average passenger load factor worldwide at 77.4%

Air freight demand, measured in freight ton kilometers, grew 5%.

IATA represents around 240 airlines worldwide.
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Old November 10th, 2007, 05:45 AM   #63
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Near misses at overcrowded airports among top aviation safety concerns
9 November 2007

BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - As global air traffic expands at record rates, experts warn that near misses on the ground at overcrowded airports are becoming one of the most serious safety concerns in civil aviation.

The danger arises when airports try to alleviate bottlenecks by adding runways. That leads to more taxiways intersecting the runways, raising the risk of accidental incursions -- where an aircraft or vehicle becomes a collision hazard by venturing onto a runway being used for takeoffs and landings.

"Runway incursions are right at the top of our agenda," said Gideon Ewers, spokesman for the International Federation of Airline Pilots' Associations.

"They are happening more and more frequently as air traffic increases and older airport designs struggle to cope," Ewers said.

He said that most incursions "pass without incident" but that those that don't produce "very bad" results.

The deadliest disaster in aviation history occurred 30 years ago as a result of such an encroachment -- the ground collision in 1977 between two fully loaded Boeing 747s in Spain's Canary Islands killed 583 people.

Since then, numerous such accidents have ended in tragedy, and experts are now racing to develop systems to prevent even deadlier disasters.

According to Eurocontrol, Europe's air navigation agency, an average of two incursions take place each day at Europe's 600 civil airports. And in the United States -- where reporting standards are different -- 182 incidents have been recorded so far in 2007, compared with 158 last year.

The most serious recent accident occurred on Oct. 8, 2001, when a Scandinavian Airline System MD-87 on takeoff smashed into a Cessna Citation which had encroached on the runway. A total of 118 people died.

More frequent are close calls like one in July at Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., where two jets missed each other by less than 30 feet. A United flight with 133 passengers on board missed a turn on the taxiway and entered an active runway where a Delta jet was about to land with 167 passengers.

"In an ideal world you'd have no runway crossings at all," said Paul Wilson, head of Airport Operations at Eurocontrol. "But the reality is that as an airport becomes busier, it also introduces more sophisticated guidance systems and procedures to prevent runway incursions."

A Federal Aviation Administration study found that the well-designed Washington's Dulles International Airport had only four incursions during the period from 1997 to 2000. The Los Angeles International Airport, with a complex layout of multiple intersecting runways and taxiways, had 29 incursions.

Experts say that when the volume of traffic -- projected to double over the next 10-15 years -- is taken into account, the potential for near misses and fatal accidents is growing fast.

"It is a problem that affects just about every airport," Wilson said.

The international pilots' union blames poorly designed airports as the primary cause of incursions. High traffic density, complicated operational procedures, nonstandard markings, and poor comprehension of English among cockpit crew add to the risks.

Although low proficiency in English -- the standard language of aviation -- plays a major role, foreign pilots also complain that air traffic controllers in the United States contribute to the problem by using confusing abbreviations or long and complex instructions.

As a result, the FAA now requires U.S. controllers to provide clear and explicit taxiing instructions to pilots, including the exact route to their designated runway and not merely which runway to use.

In order to minimize future risks, Eurocontrol, FAA and other national air safety agencies are looking into using advanced runway incursion alert systems that detect potential collisions on runways and give warnings to controllers and pilots.

One such system developed by the National Aerospace Laboratory in the Netherlands and used at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport alerts controllers to potential collisions by flashing labels on their radar screens together with audio signals. All aircraft and vehicle movements are depicted in real time on an airport map, unlike conventional radar which has a lag of several seconds.

And when Schiphol added a new, sixth runway, multiple runway crossings were specifically avoided, said Bert Ruitenberg, the airport's operational safety expert. Instead, taxiways to the new runway were built around the perimeter of existing runways.

In addition, red lights embedded in the tarmac prevent planes from entering an active runway. Ruitenberg said such stop lights should become standard airport equipment.

"At some airports expansion is driven just by capacity," Ruitenberg said. "But designers will find it is better to plan with safety in mind (because) this could avoid a lot of the problems that may occur afterward."
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Old November 28th, 2007, 09:58 AM   #64
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Regional airlines fly 12.2 million passengers in October
Nov 27, 2007 (AFP)

Airlines in the Asia Pacific flew 12.2 million passengers in October, up 4.1 percent from a year ago, an industry body said Tuesday.

For the first 10 months of this year, the 17 carriers that make up the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines (AAPA) carried 120 million passengers, an increase of 4.6 percent from the same period in 2006.

In October, the airlines utilised 76.5 percent of their passenger capacity compared with 75.5 percent last year.

"Overall, the general outlook remains reasonably stable, with the global economy still maintaining steady growth," said AAPA director general Andrew Herdman.

AAPA is a trade association of international airlines based in the region, including Air New Zealand, All Nippon Airways, Asiana Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, Singapore Airlines and Malaysia Airlines.

The other members are China Airlines, Dragonair, EVA Air, Garuda Indonesia, Japan Airlines, Korean Air, Philippine Airlines, Qantas Airways, Royal Brunei Airlines, Thai Airways and Vietnam Airlines.
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Old November 29th, 2007, 04:07 AM   #65
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Labor, credit woes weigh on airlines - IATA exec

WASHINGTON, Nov 28 (Reuters) - The financial turnaround at airlines, especially in the United States, would be at risk in 2008 if unions were too aggressive in trying to recoup wages and benefits lost in restructuring, the chief of the industry's leading trade group said.

"Unfortunately, as the industry shows even fragile profitability, labor starts to look for a free lunch. Already we've seen strikes from France to Japan," Giovanni Bisignani of the International Air Transport Association told an industry group on Wednesday.

"Several key U.S. contracts will be negotiated next year -- if labor pursues an agenda as an irresponsible adversary, our common future is limited," Bisignani said.

Globally, labor represents 23 percent of airline costs, down 5 percentage points from 2001 -- the start of a six-year restructuring accelerated by the Al Qaeda hijack attacks on New York and Washington.

During that period four U.S. carriers, United Airlines parent UAL Corp , US Airways Group Inc , Delta Air Lines Inc and Northwest Airlines Corp , fell into bankruptcy and AMR Corp , parent of U.S. leader American Airlines, nearly sought protection from creditors.

Bisignani also worries that U.S. carriers could have a hard time upgrading their aging fleets due to general economic uncertainty and continuing credit woes where debt remains high relative to cash flow.

"Lenders will be cautious and even if orders are placed today, production lines at Boeing and Airbus are virtually full for the next three years," Bisignani said.

About a third of the U.S. fleet is more than 25 years old, reducing the cost advantages of depreciation and heightening the impact of fuel costs since older jets are less efficient than the newest models.

IATA is poised next month to revise the industry's outlook to account for oil prices now pushing $100 per barrel. In September, the group projected 2008 profits of $7.8 billion, but the forecast was based on oil at just under $70 a barrel.

International carriers, especially in Europe, worry about U.S. credit market turmoil because of the potential impact on financing conditions and corporate travel. Premium travelers -- usually business customers -- account for 25 percent of traffic aboard the top-five European airlines on transatlantic flights, compared with 15 percent for the leading U.S. carriers, IATA figures show.

"That translates into a 30 percent yield premium for Europe," Bisignani said.
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Old November 29th, 2007, 12:18 PM   #66
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International Air Transport Association CEO says industry 'not financially healthy'
28 November 2007

WASHINGTON (AP) - The global airline industry this year will turn its first profit since 2000, but credit market turmoil and rising fuel prices mean carriers should wait before they "pop the champagne," the head of an international trade group said Wednesday.

The International Air Transport Association recently estimated a global yearend profit of $5.6 billion, which comes on the heels of $40 billion in losses in recent years. U.S. carriers are expected to lead the way with a profit of $2.7 billion this year.

"The industry is out of intensive care, but the industry is not financially healthy," IATA Chief Executive Giovanni Bisignani said during a speech sponsored by the Aero Club.

The credit crunch, while largely contained to the U.S., "throws a shadow over the industry" and rising fuel costs also will hurt profits, Bisignani said. IATA, which represents more than 240 airlines, in September forecast a $7.8 billion profit for 2008, but the group will release updated figures on Dec. 12 to account for fuel costs and surcharges.

Fuel costs accounted for the largest piece of U.S. airlines' operating expenses in the second quarter of 2007 at 25.4 percent, and are expected to represent about 28 percent of global expenses in 2007, according to domestic and international trade groups.

Oil prices have dropped in recent days but remain over $90 a barrel. Light, sweet crude for January delivery lost $3.80 to settle Wednesday at $90.62 on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Still, the biggest risk for an industry carrying $200 billion in debts is a recession because fuel cost increases can be mitigated in a thriving economy by surcharges and increased demand, Bisignani said.

Cost-cutting measures have resulted in the return to U.S. profitability, but also diminished investments on their aging fleets. About 35 percent of the U.S. fleet is more than 25 years old and that hurts competitiveness, he said. Upgrading will not be easy as lenders will be more cautious due to credit market conditions, and production lines at Boeing Co. and Airbus are full, he added.

To improve global efficiency, Bisignani called for government regulators to collaborate and standardize everything from data collection to security procedures in much the same way safety processes have been handled. But he added that political barriers will be hard to overcome.

Bisignani also joined the chorus of domestic carriers against a recent U.S. Transportation Department proposal to reduce flights at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport by 20 percent to help ease congestion.

He urged the agency to adopt an IATA standard administered by carriers that takes incumbents and new entries into account during the scheduling process and said the U.S. government risks retaliation and lawsuits if international carriers are somehow edged out of JFK schedules.
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Old January 7th, 2008, 05:44 AM   #67
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TABLE-International air passenger traffic up in Nov

GENEVA, Jan 4 (Reuters) - The International Air Transport Association (IATA) reported airline traffic data for November on Friday as follows:

Code:
                  NOV 2007     JAN-NOV 2007
Passenger traffic    9.3          7.5
Avg load factor      75.4         77.1
Freight              3.5          3.9
For a detailed breakdown by region, see the IATA website: http://www.iata.org/pressroom/facts_...8-01-04-01.htm

Passenger traffic shows year-on-year change in percent. It is measured in revenue passenger kilometres (RPK) which multiply the number of passengers and the distance travelled.

Load factor shows the percentage of seats filled. Air freight traffic is measured in freight tonne kilometres (FTK).

IATA, whose data exclude domestic flights, represents over 240 airlines comprising 94 percent of cross-border scheduled air traffic.
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Old May 9th, 2008, 07:57 AM   #68
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Number of airline accidents rise, fatalities drop: IATA

NEW YORK, May 8, 2008 (AFP) - The rate of aviation accidents rose in 2007 from lows in the prior year but the number of fatalities declined, the International Air Transport Association said Thursday.

In its annual report on safety, the IATA said a large number of accidents in Africa pushed up the global total along with higher numbers from Indonesia and Brazil.

The report showed that the 2007 global accident rate of 0.75 losses for every million flights by Western-built jet aircraft was slightly higher than the 0.65 rate recorded in 2006.

The number of global fatalities declined 19 percent to 692, as passenger numbers increased by six percent to over 2.2 billion passengers in 2007.

In total, there were 100 accidents in 2007 -- 57 for jet aircraft and 43 for turboprop -- compared with 77 accidents in 2006.

The industry group, which represents some 240 airlines comprising 94 percent of scheduled international traffic, said the accident rate for its members was lower than the overall total at 0.68 per million flights.

"Air travel is the safest mode of transportation. In the 10 years from 1998, the accident rate was reduced by almost half," said Giovanni Bisignani, IATA's director general.

"And the number of fatalities dropped significantly in 2007. That's good news. But our goal is always to do better: zero fatalities and zero accidents."

Africa remained the most dangerous region for air transport with an accident rate of 4.09 per million, down slightly from 4.31 per million.

The North American rate of 0.09 per million and Europe rate of 0.29 accidents per million flights were the lowest.

A spate of accidents in Indonesia pushed the Asia-Pacific accident rate to 2.76 per million flights. Latin America's rate was 1.61 per million.

Bisignani said the organization was working hard in all regions, especially Africa, to improve safety: "Despite the greatest efforts we're making in Africa -- sponsoring, safety programs, training programs -- we still have an alarming rate" of accidents.

The IATA said 48 percent of the year's accidents took place during landing, mostly involving a "runway excursion," or leaving the runway.
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Old May 9th, 2008, 07:51 PM   #69
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Safest for of transport

I wonder about the accuracy of the claim that "Air travel is the safest mode of transportation". For example, on the UK National Rail Network, the number of passenger fatalities in 2006/7 was 7 out of a total of just over 1 billion passenger journeys.
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Old May 10th, 2008, 02:41 PM   #70
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But National Rail had many years of abysmal safety records. I think 1 year's worth of data is not enough to make a conclusive analysis on how safe a mode of transport is.
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Old May 10th, 2008, 05:31 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
But National Rail had many years of abysmal safety records. I think 1 year's worth of data is not enough to make a conclusive analysis on how safe a mode of transport is.
Yes that is right, but the numbers I quote are only from the most recent annual report. I think the annual fatality rate has been below 100 for several decades. Even at its worst, I do not thing the fatality rate on the GB rail network has reached the same level as the current Air-transport rate since at least before WWII.
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Old May 10th, 2008, 09:44 PM   #72
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"Like much of America these days, the airline industry feels tired, worn down, and old" - one reporter's opinion of the US Airline industry:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programme...nt/7389575.stm
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Old May 30th, 2008, 07:23 AM   #73
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Survey: Americans made 41 million fewer trips by airplane this year because of hassles
29 May 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) - Nearly half of American air travelers would fly more if it were easier, and more than one-fourth said they skipped at least one air trip in the past 12 months because of the hassles involved, according to an industry survey.

The Travel Industry Association, which commissioned the survey released Thursday, estimated that the 41 million forgone trips cost the travel industry $18.1 billion (euro11.64 billion) -- including $9.4 billion (euro6.04 billion) to airlines, $5.6 billion (euro3.6 billion) to hotels and $3.1 billion (euro1.99 billion) -- and it cost federal, state and local authorities $4.2 billion (euro2.7 billion) in taxes in the past 12 months.

When 28 percent of air travelers avoided an average of 1.3 trips each, that resulted in 29 million leisure trips and 12 million business trips not being taken, the researchers estimated.

The survey results did not address whether travelers chose alternate transportation to pursue any of the journeys they didn't take by plane. The association estimated overall travel industry revenue at $740 billion (euro475.85 billion).

Roger Dow, president and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based association, said the research "should be a wake-up call to America's policy leaders that the time for meaningful air system reform is now."

"The air travel crisis has hit a tipping point -- more than 100,000 travelers each day are voting with their wallets by choosing to avoid trips," Dow said in a statement.

That's a big blow to airlines, many of which are losing money as the industry struggles with soaring fuel costs. Carriers have raised fares, added fees, cut capacity and scaled back expansion plans, and some small airlines have declared bankruptcy, while Delta Air Lines Inc. and Northwest Airlines Corp. announced plans to combine in an effort to reduce costs.

In all, 44 percent of the 1,003 air travelers surveyed by phone from May 6 to May 13 said they would take more air trips each year if airport hassles could be reduced or eliminated. The survey, conducted by Peter D. Hart Research Associates Inc. and The Winston Group, had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

People who flew more than five times in the past 12 months were more likely to describe air travel as frustrating, at 52 percent, compared with 33 percent of infrequent travelers, defined as people who flew one or two round trips in 12 months, according to the survey.

More than half of respondents said either efficiency or reliability is getting worse, 60 percent said the system is deteriorating, and 56 percent said flying is the "bad" or "worst" part of travel -- though 62 percent said air travel security is improving.
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Old June 13th, 2008, 09:25 AM   #74
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Carriers Reap Benefits of Oil Hedging
12 June 2008
The New York Times

PARIS -- As United States airlines reel from soaring oil prices and a sinking domestic economy, most of their European rivals appear better placed to ride out the storm.

While no airline can avoid the oil price shock, analysts say, European operators are benefiting from the relatively strong euro, given that jet fuel is priced in dollars. European carriers also fly relatively newer models of Boeing and Airbus planes, which burn 30 percent less fuel than models from the 1970s and 1980s, many of which are still in use by United States airlines.

''Europeans have the benefit of fleets that are fuel-efficient,'' said Howard Wheeldon, a senior strategist at BGC Partners, a brokerage firm in London. ''Americans always wait till the last minute and come in to buy aircraft at the end of the cycle.''

The European airlines are also reaping the benefits of consolidation, and some of them serve more lucrative long-distance routes than United States carriers.

Every airline, of course, is suffering the consequences of oil prices that are above $130 a barrel. The airline industry's biggest lobbying group, the International Air Transport Association, has said that every dollar increase in the price of oil costs a cumulative $1.6 billion for airlines.

The ability to lock into fixed fuel prices months ahead of time -- called hedging -- can help offset these rising prices. But with the exception of Southwest Airlines, most United States airlines are less hedged than European ones.

Air France-KLM has hedged 78 percent of its fuel consumption through March 2009, at $70 to $80 a barrel, Jean-Cyril Spinetta, the chairman and chief executive of the airline, said last month. Through a policy of hedging fuel four years in advance, the company saved about $35 a barrel when oil was at $120 a barrel.

But that does not mean that Air France-KLM has not felt a pinch. Pierre-Henri Gourgeon, finance director of the company, said that it could not pass the full cost of fuel price increases to its customers. Instead, it is investing about $1 billion a year in new, more fuel-efficient aircraft, to which savings from fuel-price hedging contribute significantly.

Demand has slowed on its trans-Atlantic routes, Mr. Gourgeon said, though its European routes have not suffered. ''Rather than decrease capacity, we will adjust our growth plan slightly,'' he said.

Other European airlines have also taken the hedging route. British Airways hedged 72 percent of its fuel needs for the first half of the financial year and 60 percent for the second half. Lufthansa has hedged 83 percent of its fuel requirements through the end of 2008 and said that it saved 109 million euros ($169 million), last year by doing so.

Even low-cost carriers like Air Berlin, EasyJet and Ryanair are hedging, with Ryanair recently reversing a longstanding avowal never to do so.

But some European airlines are less protected. According to the French bank BNP Paribas, the Spanish carrier Iberia has ensured 47 percent of its 2008 fuel requirements, while Aer Lingus of Ireland has hedged 36 percent. The troubled Austrian Airlines has hedged only 20 percent of its 2008 fuel needs and is reportedly under pressure to find a ''strategic alliance'' with a stronger carrier, most likely Lufthansa or Air France-KLM. has hedged only 20 percent of its 2008 fuel needs and is reportedly under pressure to find a ''strategic alliance'' with a stronger carrier, most likely Lufthansa or

European airlines are also taking advantage of a wave of consolidation that is only now reaching the United States.

Air France acquired KLM, and Lufthansa purchased Swiss International Air Lines. The two acquiring airlines succeeded in increasing the number of passengers per plane -- the ''load factor'' -- on the airlines they absorbed.

Significantly, analysts say, both of those transformative deals took place after the 2001 terror attacks in the United States and amid the ensuing global downturn in air travel, while many United States airlines were forced into bankruptcy protection.

Most European carriers that were not part of the consolidation trend, like Alitalia Airlines, which is now surviving off Italian government support, are stuck in the same position as their American counterparts.

European Union rules outlawing certain types of state aid, established in 1997, prompted struggling airlines to combine or go out of business, as was the case with Sabena of Belgium in 2001. Meanwhile, the use of Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the United States prevented airlines from merging. Consolidation, as seen with the proposed merger of Delta Air Lines and Northwest Airlines, is only now getting under way and may be short-lived.

''The Europeans took the restructuring pain earlier and more sharply than the Americans,'' said Lloyd Brown, an airline analyst at Ernst & Young in London. ''They had more foresight and less support, so they had to make hard decisions.''

Finally, at least 50 percent of the business done by European airlines like Lufthansa and Air France-KLM consists of long-distance flights to regions like Africa and Asia, which are benefiting from a boom in commodities. Asian airlines are also doing better because demand is holding up in that region.

United States airlines have proportionally less international traffic -- roughly 20 percent of their business -- to counteract the slowing demand on national routes. Furthermore, on those shorter flights, American airlines often lack the mix of business and economy classes that enables European carriers to maximize costs by charging more at the front of the plane, said Mr. Wheeldon of BGC Partners.

Still, European airlines are striving to move quickly to limit their risks.

''We are looking at the cash contribution of every flight, on a flight-by-flight basis, not just routes,'' the British Airways chief executive, William M. Walsh, said. ''We are going to take flights out where it makes no sense, with oil at $130 a barrel, to continue them.''
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Old August 4th, 2008, 02:57 PM   #75
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Air traffic growth hits five-year low in June: IATA
4 August 2008
Agence France Presse

The number of people travelling by air grew at the lowest rate for five years in June as the global economic slowdown takes its toll on demand, the air travel industry body IATA said Monday.

Global passenger traffic grew by 3.8 percent in June, the lowest level since 2003 when the industry was hit by the SARS crisis, the International Air Transport Association said in a statement.

"With consumer and business confidence falling and sky-high oil prices, the situation will get a lot worse," warned IATA's Director General and Chief Executive Officer, Giovanni Bisignani.

Passenger load factors dropped to 77.6 percent in June, down 1.2 percentage points from the same month the previous year.

Freight traffic also fell, down 0.8 in June -- the first decline since May 2005 which the IATA attributed to several months of falling manufacturing sector confidence indicators.
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Old August 5th, 2008, 04:46 AM   #76
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Air cargo suffers first fall in 3 yrs in June-IATA

GENEVA, Aug 4 (Reuters) - International air freight traffic volume fell for the first time in more than three years in June, hit by the global economic downturn, the airline industry body IATA said on Monday.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) said cargo traffic fell by 0.8 percent compared with June 2007 while passenger traffic grew by 3.8 percent, its lowest rate of increase since 2003 when the SARS health crisis caused many people to avoid air travel.

"With consumer and business confidence falling and sky-high oil prices, the situation will get a lot worse," IATA Director General Giovanni Bisignani said in a statement.

"The airline sector is in trouble," Bisignani added. "Falling demand and rising costs are re-shaping the industry."

Cross-border air freight is considered a leading economic indicator and a bellwether for the health of world trade, which took a knock last week when international negotiations over opening up global export markets collapsed in Geneva.

The Geneva-based IATA has frequently warned that high oil prices were hurting the airline sector, whose business remains closely aligned to economic swings. It said on Monday that the industry could record losses of $6.1 billion this year.

The June cargo decline was the first negative reading since May 2005. Latin American airlines saw the largest freight decline, with cargo falling 12.7 percent, and carriers in the Asia Pacific region had a 4.8 percent drop.

Still, freight remained in positive territory for North American airlines, which recorded a 4 percent year-on-year increase in June, and in the Middle East whose relatively small number of carriers saw freight rise 12.1 percent.

In the year-to-date, freight traffic is up 2.4 percent compared to the first six months of 2007, IATA said. Global passenger traffic has risen 5.4 percent in the period compared to the same time last year.

IATA represents about 230 airlines operating about 93 percent of international air traffic, and excludes domestic flights from its data.
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Old August 12th, 2008, 04:37 AM   #77
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Lufthansa strikes hit European traffic in July

FRANKFURT, Aug 11 (Reuters) - European and domestic passenger traffic at German airline Deutsche Lufthansa slipped 0.6 percent last month, reversing growth in previous months as strikes forced the carrier to cut flights.

But Lufthansa posted a 6.2 percent rise in overall traffic in July, helped by 17 percent growth at its Swiss unit, fully consolidated since July 2007. The load factor, or portion of capacity filled, eased 0.9 percentage points to 82.9 percent.

Lufthansa was hit by strikes by ground staff and cabin crew in the last week of July as well as walkouts by regional pilots earlier in the month in a series of disputes over pay.

"At Lufthansa the effects of the strike are particularly noticeable in the Europe traffic region," Lufthansa said in a statement on Monday.

"Although capacity still rose by 0.3 percent, this was considerably less than in prior months due to the strike. (Traffic) dropped by 3.1 percent compared with the previous year, so that the load factor was also (2.5 percentage points) lower at 73.3 percent."

The group load factor on European and domestic flights fell 2 percentage points to 74.2 percent in July.

Passenger traffic grew in all other regions, jumping 9.7 percent on routes to and from the Americas, 8 percent on Asia/Pacific services and 8.5 percent on flights to and from the Middle East and Africa, Europe's second-biggest carrier added.

Rival British Airways said on Tuesday its traffic fell by 3.5 percent in July, led by a slump in economy passengers. Larger competitor Air France KLM posted a 1.8 percent rise in July passenger traffic.

Lufthansa blamed seasonal effects and the strikes for a 7.5 percent drop in air freight and post at its Lufthansa Cargo unit to 142,000 tonnes. The number of flights fell 18 percent.

"The Americas traffic region, which is suffering from the economic downswing, was particularly affected," Lufthansa added.

Group cargo and mail, including the contribution from Swiss, fell 5.1 percent to 162,000 tonnes.
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Old September 12th, 2008, 08:09 PM   #78
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FACTBOX-Europe's biggest airlines by traffic

Sept 12 (Reuters) - Germany's Lufthansa is examining a takeover of Scandinavian carrier SAS, sources familiar with the matter told Reuters. That would create an airline almost as big as Europe's largest by traffic, Air France KLM.

Here is a list of Europe's largest airlines by traffic, measured in revenue passenger kilometers (RPKs), and by cargo, measured in scheduled freight tonnes carried, based on 2007 statistics from the International Air Transport Association and company Web sites:-

Code:
 CARRIER                       RPKs (billions)
 Air France KLM                203
 Lufthansa (incl Swiss)        147
 British Airways               113
 Iberia                         54
 SAS Group                      41
 Virgin Atlantic                41
 Alitalia                       38
 Turkish Airlines               29
 TAP                            19
 Austrian Airlines              17
 Finnair                        16
 
 CARRIER                       FREIGHT (thousand tonnes)
 Air France KLM                1,445
 Lufthansa (incl Swiss)        1,433
 British Airways                 687
 Iberia                          232
 Alitalia                        231
 Virgin Atlantic                 209
 Turkish Airlines                174
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Old October 17th, 2008, 07:18 AM   #79
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Some airlines will not survive global financial crisis: industry group
8 October 2008
Agence France Presse

Some airlines will not survive the worsening global economic situation, an industry association said Wednesday, warning that the next 12-18 months will be "extremely difficult" for Asia-Pacific carriers.

Passenger numbers are falling as Americans and Europeans curtail travel plans and the current financial market turmoil undermines consumer confidence, the Association of Asia Pacific Airlines (AAPA) said in a statement monitored on its website.

"The biggest challenges right now are weakening passenger demand, particularly for first and business class travel, and continuing uncertainty about the global economic outlook," AAPA director-general Andrew Herdman said.

"Asian carriers are therefore bracing themselves for a period of continued turbulence, hopefully without losing sight of their long term strategic goals and future growth opportunities.

"The next 12-18 months will be extremely difficult times for airlines and some won't survive the current crisis."

He added that the association "remains extremely cautious about prospects for the airline industry in 2009."

While fuel prices have recently declined, they are still 25 percent higher than last year, Herdman said.

The crisis, which began in the US subprime, or higher-risk, mortgage sector, has been routing global financial markets and there are signs the impact is affecting other economic sectors such as manufacturing, tourism and property.

AAPA is a trade association of international airlines based in the region, including Air New Zealand, All Nippon Airways, Asiana Airlines, Cathay Pacific Airways, Singapore Airlines and Malaysia Airlines.

The other members are China Airlines, Dragonair, EVA Air, Garuda Indonesia, Japan Airlines, Korean Air, Philippine Airlines, Qantas Airways, Royal Brunei Airlines, Thai Airways and Vietnam Airlines.
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Old October 23rd, 2008, 08:46 AM   #80
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Major European airlines don't see quick turnaround as passenger numbers slump
22 October 2008

BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - Europe's major airlines said Wednesday that the economic slowdown cut passenger numbers in September and they do not expect a turnaround in the near future.

Alitalia, Spanair and Icelandair were worst hit as the number of people flying on member airlines dropped 1.1 percent, the Association of European Airlines said.

The group said this was the first time in 25 years that the economy caused traffic to fall and came after three months of slow growth over the summer.

With worse likely still to come as European economies slide close to recession, AEA's secretary general Ulrich Schulte-Strathaus said passenger numbers "cannot be expected to recover in the immediate future."

He blamed a "toxic combination" of a slowing economy, declining business and consumer confidence and high inflation driven by higher oil prices -- even though they have come down from recent record levels.

Flights within European countries fell sharply, down 12 percent, while lucrative trans-Atlantic flights between Europe and North America did not grow at all. Only flights from Europe to the Middle East and to the South Atlantic grew -- neither of them major markets.

The AEA said load factors -- the amount of passengers filling up airplane seats -- continued to slide and this was "a massive burden on the industry's profitability."

Italy's flagship carrier Alitalia, which went bankrupt in August, saw the worst drop in passenger numbers, down 25 percent from a year ago.

Spanish airline Spanair was down 21 percent as the bursting of a housing bubble saw the country's economy slow sharply.

Another economically troubled nation's airline, Icelandair, flew 12.8 percent fewer people as the banking crisis saw Iceland itself teeter on the brink of bankruptcy.

But Europe's biggest airlines fared better. Germany's Lufthansa -- which flew nearly 5 million people last month -- saw numbers grow 4.2 percent. Air France saw a 0.2 percent drop in traffic while British Airways saw a larger 5.1 percent decline.

The AEA represents 35 European airlines, mostly national flag carriers, that carry about 380 million people a year. It does not count passenger numbers on budget airlines such as Ryanair or chartered vacation flights.
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