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Old June 4th, 2010, 01:04 PM   #1
Langur
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London Gateway, 3.5 million TEU container port, UC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Gateway
http://www.londongateway.com/portal/...N_GATEWAY/Home

London Gateway

Check out the awesome video:
http://www.londongateway.com/portal/...N_GATEWAY/Home



London Gateway is a major new deep-water port, which will be able to handle the biggest container ships in the world, under construction on the north bank of the River Thames in Thurrock, Essex. In addition to the new port, the development will include one of Europe’s largest logistics parks, providing effective access (by road and railways) to London and the rest of Great Britain. The development will dramatically increase the capabilities of the Port of London in handling modern container shipping.

The project is being undertaken by DP World, one of the largest marine terminal operators in the world. Construction began in the first quarter of 2010 and is expected to take several years, with the port and logistics park completed in stages.

History
London Gateway is located on the former Shell Haven site in Thurrock in Essex. The 1,800-acre (7.3 km2) site is a former oil refinery, which closed in 1999. However, the site has been used as a port since the 16th Century.

DP World received government approval in May 2007 for the development of London Gateway. The proposals were also identified by Gordon Brown as one of the four economic hubs essential for the regeneration of the Thames Gateway.

In May 2008, the Department for Transport issued a "Harbour Empowerment Order" for London Gateway, which provided official and statutory powers for the new port and established London Gateway as a legally recognised authority.

The future of the project was less certain after Moody's downgraded DP World's financial status to 'junk' in December 2009 in relation to the Financial crisis of 2007–2010 and associated financial problems for DP World's owners Dubai World. In January 2010 DP World announced its intention to seek a share listing on the London Stock Exchange in the second quarter of 2010 and was also given the go-ahead for construction of the port. Work started in February 2010.

Port
London Gateway port will include a 2,700 metre long container quay, with a fully developed capacity of 3.5 million TEU a year [7]. The port will be located on the major shipping lanes serving north west Europe, and will increase national deep-sea port capacity for the UK, as identified as necessary by the government.

At present the ports of Felixstowe and Southampton are the first and second largest ports by container traffic in the UK, with the Port of London third.

DP World has stated that high quality architecture, sustainability, and high levels of security and management will be key features of the park and will create an attractive environment for occupiers.

Distribution Park
The distribution park at London Gateway will cover a development area of 300 hectares (700 acres). It will accommodate buildings in excess of one million sq ft, and offer linkages to local road and rail networks with access across the UK, including London. Outline planning permission has been granted for a total of 9,500,000 sq ft (883,000 m2).

Transport Links
Junction 30 of the M25 motorway and some existing junctions on the A13 roads could be upgraded subject to funding and a rail connection to the port will be made to the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway line via an existing freight line.

Financing
DP World is planning to invest over £1.5bn to develop the project over a 10-15 year development period. It predicts that London Gateway will deliver about 12,000 new direct jobs, benefit the local and regional economy, and assist the government’s Thames Gateway regeneration initiative. In addition, there will be over 30,000 indirect and induced jobs.

Policing
The London Gateway Port Harbour Empowerment Order 2008 permits the harbour authority to apply to a justice of the peace to appoint constables to form a police force for the port (and for justices of the peace to dismiss them). If appointed, they will have all the powers and privileges of a constable within the port area, and if they pursue someone from the port area, then they will retain the same powers of arrest as they would have if they were still in the port area. The majority of the provisions of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 were applied by the Order.
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Last edited by Langur; June 4th, 2010 at 01:42 PM.
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Old June 4th, 2010, 01:28 PM   #2
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Check out the awesome video:
http://www.londongateway.com/portal/...N_GATEWAY/Home
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Old June 4th, 2010, 03:20 PM   #3
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That's a very slick movie. It looks like the project with no downsides.

“In the coming years more than 35,000 people will be employed in and around the port" - This could really be the saviour for the area still reeling from the huge scalling down of Ford.

Has anyone read anything about supporting infrastructure. I'm a little worried for the A13 and M25.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 10:25 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Langur View Post
From 5 min 15 sec is mental, all those cranes!

There's gonna be no improvements to the A13? Would be good to see most of the traffic go by rail but is the network capable of that?
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Old June 5th, 2010, 10:57 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompey77 View Post
From 5 min 15 sec is mental, all those cranes!

There's gonna be no improvements to the A13? Would be good to see most of the traffic go by rail but is the network capable of that?
Short - answer - It depends

The rail link to the National network is based on the old rail link to the Shellhaven terminal which links to the national network just east of Stanford le Hope. The line then is able to bypass the LT&SR at Barking over a series of grade separated junctions. It then is able to access the NLL at Stratford via Forest Gate Junction and Stratford or alternatively at Gospel Oak. The Gospel Oak and Barking is the subject of a major debate/row between the Mayor and TfL and the DfT about whether or not it should be electrified from Harringay Park Junction. Capacity to accomodate extra trains on this line are limited.

Capacity on the GEML is also limited as it is used by container trains coming from the Haven ports of Felixstowe and Harwich, both of which are being expanded. Some of this will be diverted in due course on the F2N (Felixstowe to Nuneaton via Peterborough) but the GEML capacity thus released is being keenly eyed by other operators.

Will the necessary upgrades come together in time? - my personal feeling is that we have a shambles in the making.
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Old June 5th, 2010, 04:56 PM   #6
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Thought this project was having a disastorous effect of the marine wildlife due to all the dredging that needs to take place?
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Old June 7th, 2010, 02:51 PM   #7
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Is this the reason a developer from Essex was buying up Kent marshland and designating it nature reserves? Vaguely remember it in the local news a few years ago, but can't remember the project. Much of it was land previously earmarked for the failed new airport at Cliffe.
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Old July 20th, 2010, 10:24 PM   #8
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Sorry for the late bump. I have no new material to post, other than my appreciation for this project. What a great project! This country once thrived from commercial shipping and manufacturing. It's good to see a return to things.
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Old July 20th, 2010, 11:00 PM   #9
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I'm sure it's a very worthy project but I'm afraid I just can't see that it signifies what you say. We have a growing population and ever-shrinking manufacturing it seems, and so we need more facilities like this to import stuff. We never lost shipping, it just became more automated and less glamorous, more about importation than exportation, and moved away from places like inner London in search of more land and easier goods transportation.

That's all it signifies.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 11:01 AM   #10
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It signifies that the world economy judges the UK to have a bright future.
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Old July 21st, 2010, 11:16 AM   #11
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We never lost shipping, it just became more automated and less glamorous, more about importation than exportation, and moved away from places like inner London in search of more land and easier goods transportation.
Apart from our position in world trade is not what it used to be, mostly due to our lack of port capacity and the huge capacity of our competitiors in Rotterdam, Antwerp and Germany. Trade passing through does not really use our ports - capacity constraints mean our ports are mainly for UK traffic, and we don't get to skim a few quid in port charges on non-UK traffic as much as Rotterdam does. Hence the latter goes from strength to strength and our ports don't.

Until now. This is a significant investment for the UK, and is a great addition to the economy, although it will take years to bed down and have an impact, along with he expansions being undertaken at Felixtowe.

Don't brush this aside, I feel its more significant than you suggest.
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Old July 23rd, 2010, 08:45 PM   #12
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What they should do is work with eurotunnel to develop a depot with all security,customs carried out with trains being able to go straight through to the mainland, then perhaps if price is competitive we could get some mainland bound shipping.
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Old September 5th, 2010, 07:16 AM   #13
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3 Million Cubic Metres and Counting…

Original article from London Gateway

(Press Release 26.07.10)

The UAE Ambassador to the UK and the CEO of DP World have visited the London Gateway port development to inspect dredging work being carried out on the UK’s first deep sea port in over 20 years.

Over 3 million cubic metres of dredging has now been completed for the new port that will bring the world’s largest container ships to within 25 miles of central London. Work continues 24 hours a day seven days a week at the site in Thurrock, Essex. Visitors can now walk 200 metres out onto new land that has been created from the beneficial reuse of the dredged material.

His Excellency Abdul Rahman Ghanem Al Mutaiwe'e, UAE Ambassador to the UK, said: “I am very pleased to visit London Gateway, which is the UK’s largest jobs creation project today. This project is one of the largest investments into the UK by the UAE and I look forward to DP World delivering an exemplary world class infrastructure asset.”

DP World’s CEO Mohammed Sharaf said: “The works are progressing very well and we are meeting with our global customers and potential park tenants to discuss London Gateway. He continued, “London Gateway will be one of the most advanced container terminals in the world connected to one of Europe’s largest logistics parks and together, with the outstanding location to the hinterland markets, we believe our customers will benefit from significant efficiency savings within their supply chains.”

Dredging is a key element in DP World’s investment at London Gateway. Work will continue until nearly 30 million cubic metres has been completed. London Gateway will provide 3.5 million TEU capacity for the UK when fully
operational.
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Old September 5th, 2010, 07:28 AM   #14
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Rehousing animals: First catch your vole

Original article on Building.co.uk

27 August 2010 | By Thomas Lane

The London Gateway port will handle 3.5 million containers a year and is a huge construction undertaking. But an added complication is the relocation of thousands of animals that inhabit the area - at a cost of £50m

If proof were needed that badly polluted industrial sites can be successfully rehabilitated, the former Shell Haven oil refinery on the banks of the Thames is it. This 750ha site closed down in 1999.

Shell spent more than £50m demolishing the refinery and cleaning up the site before moving on. In the following 10 years, nature has recolonised the site so it now has the typical Thames-side mix of long grass and reeds complete with animals and reptiles. These include snakes, lizards and protected species such as water voles and great crested newts, which were attracted to the ponds created by water collecting in the depressions left by former pile caps.

Although this is great for biodiversity, it’s not such good news for port operator DP World. It is just starting the mammoth task of building the London Gateway port, which is set to increase the UK’s port capacity by 3.5 million shipping containers each year (see What is London Gateway? below). The scale of the job is mind-boggling: 23 million m3 of earth will be used to build up the level of the site by 3m so rising sea levels won’t flood what will be Europe’s largest logistics park and an enormous port.

The new port is being designed to handle the next generation of cargo ships that are so big they can’t get up the Thames. This means scooping out 3.5m of riverbed from a 300m wide channel stretching from the port all the way to the North Sea 15 miles away. Because the ships are too big to get anywhere near the riverbank, a 2.7km long, 175ha quay has to be created in the river.

Inevitably all this work is having a huge impact on terrestrial and marine wildlife. But some of the species are protected and the directors of DP World can be thrown in jail if a worker so much as injures one. So it is crucial to ensure no harm comes to any living creature and DP World is spending £50m to achieve this - ironically the same amount of money Shell spent making the site such a welcoming place for wildlife in the first place.

DP World has drafted in wildlife supremo Marcus Pearson, who managed the environmental programme on the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, Heathrow Terminal 5 and, most recently, the Olympic Park. First, he has to survey the whole site to find out what is living there. Then he has to work out precisely how the animals are going to be caught and where they will be moved to. He then has to work up a plan that details how the new sites will be monitored and managed over the next 10 years. A species masterplan is also prepared. And until Pearson has done his job, no construction work can start on the site.

All the method statements and plans are submitted to Natural England for approval. “It’s a tortuous process and a bureaucratic nightmare,” says Pearson, adding that this application is the largest ever handled by Natural England. Once work is under way, the bureaucracy doesn’t let up - Pearson has to organise a quarterly progress meeting for all the stakeholders, 92 people in all. “It takes about a week to organise,” he says.

The basic principle of wildlife relocation is that exactly the same habitat has to be recreated elsewhere. In the case of the newts, DP World has had to buy two plots of land to decant them to. These add up to 41ha of what was originally grazed marshland to the north and east of the main site. Having bought the land, 20,000 bushes and shrubs have been planted and 45 ponds dug. Another four ponds have been placed in a “buffer zone” ringing the perimeter of the site.

But fewer great crested newts have been caught than the initial surveys suggested.

“We are going to have all these ponds, which are quite expensive to build, with not many newts in them,” says Pearson. Despite this, Natural England rules stipulate that the land cannot be used for other purposes - the tenant farmer cannot continue grazing the land as before.

“Natural England is 100% focused on the newts and is not interested in anything else,” says Pearson. “The pond areas can be grazed at a rate of one cow per 4ha, which is no good to the farmer. His family has been here for three generations so it’s quite emotional. I think we could have kept the area much smaller and kept it as a viable farm.”

Like the great crested newts, the water voles also needed a carefully prepared habitat. A site was found on the River Colne in Essex, but first the mink had to be eliminated as they would have killed the voles. According to Pearson any delays catching the mink would have delayed moving the water voles - “which impacts on the works in the park”. “The financial penalties would have been horrendous,” he says. Fortunately the relocation of water voles has gone to plan; half of the 300 that were caught on the London Gateway site were recently released into their new home.

There are four types of reptile on the site: slowworms, adders, common lizards and grass snakes. Environmental contractor Aecom reckons there are 40,000 of them. They are being rehomed in a variety of locations - for example, 8,000 reptiles recently went to a nearby RSPB reserve at West Canvey Marsh. Most of the rest are being taken to a disused airfield in Wiltshire.

Out on the Thames, work dredging the river channel has started. The material is being used to create the new quay; once this is complete and all the wildlife removed, dredged material will be used to raise the level of the site by 3m. It will take four years to create the new river channel with the work constantly monitored by 12 people. Special buoys in the river measure the levels of dissolved oxygen, the amount of silt and the salinity of the water and send the data back to the monitoring station. If any of these exceed prescribed limits, work has to stop. Fish and bird populations are also monitored, with fishermen compensated for the loss of their catches. But Pearson says they don’t always do the paperwork needed to get the money. “I’ve had rotten fish sent to me,” he says with a sigh.

As happened with the land, the lost maritime habitat has to be recreated elsewhere. Nearly 3km of tidal zone at the edge of the river is being lost to the quay so it has been recreated on a 30ha plot next to the site. A second 44ha site has been bought on the other side of the river. Half a metre has been skimmed off its surface and a 300m long breach has been made in the sea wall so water can flood in at high tide, creating ideal conditions for wading birds.

A Roman roundhouse and saltmaking works was discovered during the levelling works. This had to be excavated by archeologists then protected from the water flooding into the site. The work is finished but Pearson is still waiting for the birds to turn up. “The aim is to get 7,000 wading birds here, what we would like are avocets,” he says. “Unfortunately most of the ones here at the moment are gulls from the tip.”

How to catch 300 voles, 1,500 great crested newts and 40,000 reptiles

The first tranche of animals were removed from the 350ha port area of the site by Thomson Ecology. Multidisciplinary consultant Aecom won the job to clear the 200ha area occupied by the logistics park.

Richard Graves, Aecom’s director of ecology, expects that by the time his team of 50 people has finished clearing the site in early November, 300 voles, 1,500 great crested newts and 40,000 reptiles will have been moved.

“It’s a very intensive effort,” he says, adding that the team has to be on hand seven days a week for almost 24 hours a day because animals that have been captured cannot be left alone over a weekend.

Great crested newts are caught by erecting fences made from poles and plastic sheeting. Because the animals can’t get past the fences, they walk along them and into strategically placed sunken buckets that are regularly emptied by Aecom. More than 40km of fences have been erected to catch the newts. “You are talking about a huge manpower effort firstly to put up all the fences and secondly to check all the buckets,” says Graves.

Catching the reptiles is an even bigger job. There are slowworms, adders, common lizards and grass snakes on the site. A total of 14,000 squares made from roofing felt or a corrugated plastic material are dotted around the site. These warm up in the sun and because reptiles like warm places they collect under the tiles. “Those 14,000 tiles are checked typically twice a day,” says Graves. “The only problem is when the weather gets hot the reptiles become too fast to capture.” The team need to wear gloves and long trousers to protect against snake bites. “They aren’t really that dangerous,” says Graves.

The water voles were caught by Thomson using traps. After they were caught the animals were placed in a dedicated centre while their new home on the river Colne was prepared. These have all been moved - except for 10 breeding pairs that have been kept back in case anything untoward happens to the rehomed voles.

Reptiles cannot be kept in captivity for very long: snakes can be kept for four days while other reptiles are kept for two days. Regular trips are made to the disused airfield in Wiltshire where most of the reptiles are being rehoused - a van can typically take 500 animals at a time.

What is London Gateway?

The idea behind the £1.5bn London Gateway scheme is to revolutionise the way goods are imported and distributed. Currently, goods are brought into docks at Felixstowe and Southampton, then loaded onto lorries and taken to a distribution corridor on the M1 as there isn’t room at the docks to store and distribute goods.

The idea is to combine a port and distribution centre at London Gateway, which harks back to the days of warehouses next to the Thames.

The distribution centre will be Europe’s largest with 860,000m2 of storage space. Because about half of the goods brought into the port are destined for London and the South-east, it cuts out an expensive 100-mile road journey to the M1 distribution centres. Developer DP World says this should cut out 60 million lorry miles a year. Goods can be sent out from the distribution centre by road or rail or by small boats.

The target source for goods is Asia. These will be brought in by a new generation of 400m-long super-cargo ships. The new quay will have six berths and the boats will be unloaded using automated machinery. The port will be able to handle 3.5 million shipping containers a year.
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Old September 5th, 2010, 07:33 AM   #15
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Building London Gateway - Port of the Future

Link to Institution of Civil Engineers article

Date: 14 SEPTEMBER 2010
Time: 18:00 - 20:00
Event Type: Lecture

A presentation by David Lind, Senior Engineering Manager Maritime, London Gateway, DP World and other London Gateway Staff.

London Gateway is a unique development that will combine the UK’s newest deep-sea container port with Europe’s largest logistics park, using world-leading technology to increase productivity and reduce costs.

Situated on the north bank of the River Thames, London Gateway provides unrivalled deep-sea shipping access for the world’s leading businesses at the heart of the country’s largest consumer market just 10 miles from the M25 motorway. London Gateway’s highly efficient road, rail and sea links will offer a quicker, cheaper and more environmentally friendly way to transport goods to their destination.

David Lind is a Chartered Civil Engineer with more than 25 years experience in the maritime sector. In addition to his involvement at London Gateway, David has had a leading role in the development of container terminals in UK – including Thamesport and Tilbury – and worldwide – including Port Klang (Malaysia), Hidd (Bahrain) and Bandar Abbas (Iran).

In their presentations, David and his colleagues will provide an update on the development and will describe the construction works in progress to create Phase 1 of the port and associated environmental monitoring and mitigation measures.

Refreshments will be available from 6pm. Whilst registering to attend this event is not required, it would be helpful for catering purposes if attendees could indicate if they are planning to attend. The meeting is open to ICE members and other interested parties. There is ample parking available.

A flyer with a map and directions to the event can be downloaded.

For further information and to indicate an intention to attend, please contact: Andrew Kenyon
t: 0776 483 4418
e: [email protected]
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Old September 24th, 2010, 02:19 AM   #16
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London is not a city. It is more like a country, and living in it is like living in Holland or Belgium. Its completeness makes it deceptive - there are sidewalks from one frontier to the other - and its hugeness makes it possible for everyone to invent his own city. My London is not your London, though everyone's Washington, DC is pretty much the same.
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Old September 28th, 2010, 05:11 PM   #17
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As happened with the land, the lost maritime habitat has to be recreated elsewhere. Nearly 3km of tidal zone at the edge of the river is being lost to the quay so it has been recreated on a 30ha plot next to the site. A second 44ha site has been bought on the other side of the river. Half a metre has been skimmed off its surface and a 300m long breach has been made in the sea wall so water can flood in at high tide, creating ideal conditions for wading birds.
You could have just answered my question on June 7th 2010. But then this whole discussion seems to be becoming a PR puff. I know the Kent side well. While it is nice a very small part of it will become more like Great Expectations again, it is terrible what we will soon be looking at on the other side, just so we can have more cheap imports from Asia.
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Old September 28th, 2010, 06:06 PM   #18
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Is there a free market in docking space in Britain? Will this be in competition for shipping with Felixstowe, for instance?

Or are the ships owned by the harbour owners?
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Old September 29th, 2010, 12:17 AM   #19
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Its a free market, it will be competition for Felixstowe, who are currently undergoing a large expansion themselves.
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Old September 29th, 2010, 11:26 PM   #20
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You could have just answered my question on June 7th 2010. But then this whole discussion seems to be becoming a PR puff. I know the Kent side well. While it is nice a very small part of it will become more like Great Expectations again, it is terrible what we will soon be looking at on the other side, just so we can have more cheap imports from Asia.
Oh please! This stretch of the Thames saw centuries of maritime trade. Personally, I'm happy to see some life coming back to this stretch of the river. Rolling hills are no more "natural" than towns and ports. It's all man-made!
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