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Old January 9th, 2011, 01:39 AM   #121
Jim856796
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In Malaysia a skyscraper named Bangunan Dato Zainal in Kuala Lumpur was built in 1971.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 10:34 AM   #122
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.



Montevideo, Uruguay,

P A L A C I O S A L V O (1928)

















.
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Old January 9th, 2011, 08:38 PM   #123
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First Skycrapers in Switzerland

City | Building Name | Architect(s) | Floors | Hight | Year

Lausanne | Bel-Air Métropole | Alphonse Laverrière | 16 | 52m | 1931


Basel | Entenweid | Gfeller & Mähly | 13 | 38m | 1951
[IMG]http://t3.************/images?q=tbn:-RM776vxWXMxfM:http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x251/face_photo_2007/Entenweid.jpg&t=1[/IMG]

Montreux | Tour d'Ivoire | Hugo Buscaglia | 29 | 82m | 1962
image hosted on flickr


Winterthur | Sulzer-Hochhaus | Suter + Suter | 26 | 92.4 (100)m | 1962
Remark: Till 2003, it was not only the first skyscraper in Winterthur but also the tallest one in the whole country. In 2007 the building has been renovated and raised up to 100m.
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Old January 11th, 2011, 01:07 AM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
I hear there are discussions on what could be considered as a building that could be posted here. I’ll clear it up: When I started this tread my intention was to see the first high building of every country in the modern era. So I don't want to see minarets or churches or other historical or ancient buildings. Lets say we post buildings build during/after the industrial revolution. Buildings that where build with steel and concrete, in the modern era. Buildings that are inhabitable and used for living/offices/shopping



The first serious highrise in the Netherlands (other than churh- and watertowers etc.)
was indeed built in Rotterdam, het Witte Huis 1898:
image hosted on flickr

Source.



"The White House" still had brick walls to support it, we need to look for a building with a skeleton.
The Lichttoren (Eindhoven, 1921) comes to mind:
image hosted on flickr

Source.



"The Lighttower" was used as a factory at first. The first building with a (concrete) skeleton
and with offices or appartments in it, was Nirwana (The Hague, 1930):
image hosted on flickr

Source.



Nirwana at the other hand is quite low. The first skyscraper that is over 500 feet tall is
the Maastoren (Rotterdam, 2009):
image hosted on flickr

Source.



Now, which one to choose?
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Old January 11th, 2011, 05:31 AM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Bricks View Post
Finland

Hotel Torni, Helsinki opened in 1931 and is 70m tall

I had a beer up there 2 summers ago.
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Old September 4th, 2014, 11:44 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post
Oh brother. That style was simply the trendy design feature of the 1920s. It's to be found everywhere, not just in the United States. Set backs on buildings have existed for 2 millenia and it was incorporated into skyscrapers from Australia to Canada to the US. Next you'll tell me that automobiles are American.

Having influenced the development of something is one thing, saying it's American is quite another.
Skyscrapers were invented in America, gained their formal characteristics in America and were seen elsewhere as very much an American cultural import. To suggest that Canada and Australia and Europe were running the things up in any quantity or showed any independent initiative in their design until well into the 20th century is simply absurd.

To wit, the first skyscraper in Canada, the wonderful New York Insurance Building (the hint might just come in the name of the building), cited elsewhere in this thread.

Designed by the American firm of Babb, Cook & Willard.

Or the equally notable Trader’s Building, also cited in this thread as the beginning of Canada’s skyscraper race, built in 1905 in Toronto.

Designed by the American firm of Carrere & Hastings.

Or one of the first true skyscrapers in Australia, cited in his thread, the Prell Building, with the first Otis (American company) passenger lift in that country.

Designed by the American engineer Wilhelm Prell.

Or another great early skyscraper in Australia, the Home Equitable Insurance of the USA Building (again, a slight hint in the name)

Designed by the American architect Edward E. Raht.

It is very hard to find a single significant building of the skyscraper type outside of the US until well after the 1930s that does not have either an American designer, an American advisor on board or a clearly American model.

I'm not quite sure how that doesn't make them an American type of building.
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Old September 5th, 2014, 01:13 AM   #127
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The brown thing in front is a pedestal where an old Lenin statue was. It looks terrible nowadays and the building itself is usually covered in ads.
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Old September 5th, 2014, 01:04 PM   #128
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.:South Korea:.
The first REAL skyscraper in South Korea was built in Seoul in 1970 and it was the Samil Building (31 Building) of 110m
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Old September 5th, 2014, 06:34 PM   #129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seoul_Korea View Post
.:South Korea:.
The first REAL skyscraper in South Korea was built in Seoul in 1970 and it was the Samil Building (31 Building) of 110m
I don't think you are Korean .
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Old September 5th, 2014, 09:16 PM   #130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimiwind1184 View Post
I don't think you are Korean .
Anyone said that I'm Korean. Only you.
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Old September 6th, 2014, 01:01 PM   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WrightTurn View Post
Skyscrapers were invented in America, gained their formal characteristics in America and were seen elsewhere as very much an American cultural import. To suggest that Canada and Australia and Europe were running the things up in any quantity or showed any independent initiative in their design until well into the 20th century is simply absurd.

To wit, the first skyscraper in Canada, the wonderful New York Insurance Building (the hint might just come in the name of the building), cited elsewhere in this thread.

Designed by the American firm of Babb, Cook & Willard.

Or the equally notable Trader’s Building, also cited in this thread as the beginning of Canada’s skyscraper race, built in 1905 in Toronto.

Designed by the American firm of Carrere & Hastings.

Or one of the first true skyscrapers in Australia, cited in his thread, the Prell Building, with the first Otis (American company) passenger lift in that country.

Designed by the American engineer Wilhelm Prell.

Or another great early skyscraper in Australia, the Home Equitable Insurance of the USA Building (again, a slight hint in the name)

Designed by the American architect Edward E. Raht.

It is very hard to find a single significant building of the skyscraper type outside of the US until well after the 1930s that does not have either an American designer, an American advisor on board or a clearly American model.

I'm not quite sure how that doesn't make them an American type of building.
Skyscrapers are not an invention. They are just buildings that are taller than other buildings. What's important are the different components that were invented that allowed tall buildings to be built. For example:

The first Iron Framed Building:

Ditherington Flax Mill, Shrewsbury, England.





The first curtain wall buildings were used in the Ottoman Empire, but the first modern example is Oreal Chambers built in 1864 in Liverpool, England.



Early steam elevators were invented and used in England in the early 1800s, but the first modern style safety elevator was installed in the E.V. Haughwout Building in New York in 1857.



Now I'm not saying that an iron framed mill in Shrewsbury, or a glass curtain wall building in Liverpool directly resulted in the skyscrapers that started coming out of America in the late 1800s, but it was these innovations that when put together allowed tall buildings to be built. It just happens that these tall buildings took off in America first.

Now arguably the first "skyscraper" in the UK was Queen Anne's Mansions, build in London in 1873. It was the first residential building in the UK to exceed 100ft and boasted hydraulic lifts, which were the first of their kind installed in a building in the UK. So tall was it that it blocked Queen Victoria's view of Parliament from Buckingham Palace. Suffice to say, she was none too happy about that. The political fallout resulted in a blanket 80ft height limit being imposed on new developments in London; Hence why London didn't have a skyscraper boom in the late 1800s, despite being the largest city in the world at the time. Interestingly, Queen Anne's Mansions was so tall for it's time, that fire appliances couldn't reach the top in the event of a fire. Thus the building had New York style water tanks on the roof, so the building could be drowned should a fire break out.

13 stories, 160ft.



15 years after it was built, the Times newspaper said the following of Queen Anne's Mansions:

Quote:
‘the paltry twelve or thirteen storeys of Queen Anne’s-mansions
are dwarfed into insignificance’ by New York skyscrapers acknowledged to have
‘a real beauty as well as a practical use of their own’. There was nothing about sheer
height that was ‘inherently ugly’. It would be far worse ‘if the upper ten storeys of
Queen Anne’s-mansions were to be taken down and spread over St James’s Park, to
house the same number of inhabitants as they house at present’

Last edited by Core Rising; September 6th, 2014 at 01:30 PM.
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Old November 20th, 2015, 08:26 PM   #132
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Kızılay Emek Business Center (Turkey)

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