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Old July 1st, 2010, 11:50 PM   #61
Jakob
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Istanbul

Istanbul:

Topçu Military Palace got replaced by a park:












Ali Paşa Palace got destroyed:








The Tepebaşı Theatre got destroyed and replaced by TRT television studios:






The huge Palace of Justice in Sultanahmet district got destroyed:








The beautiful building on the left side opposite Nusretiye Mosque got replaced because of road expansion:










The art-deco building on the left side at Galatasaray Square got replaced:






The oriental art-nouveau building got replaced by a very ugly box:








The Italian embassy on the left side got destroyed:



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Old July 2nd, 2010, 12:16 AM   #62
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Rotterdam:

image hosted on flickr



Pics stolen from the Dutch forum
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Old July 2nd, 2010, 06:47 PM   #63
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Omg.. i thought this happend only in México!!
Replacing beautiful buildings with crap should be ilegal!!
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Old July 3rd, 2010, 03:36 PM   #64
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Bratislava - the old jewish quarter was completely demolished by communists because of construction of New bridge and highway in the city center.

Just two buildings from this image survived: Church and a house on the right side



Different view


It was replaced by this:


Another quarter, Vydrica, called also Theresienstadt and famous as "red-light district", was demolished during construction of bridge. Buildings on the lower part of this image were completely demolished


This was the communist plan for this area:


Nowadays there are just some preserved buildings (8 out of 200), three apartment blocks and some archeological excavations
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Old July 3rd, 2010, 04:14 PM   #65
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The prevailing role of the Synagogue as a spiritual center in East-European Communities before and during the Holocaust Period

http://www.bh.org.il/

by Sandra Siano-Weinreb

Historical Background

Jews had lived in Europe for 2000 years. Mostly East and Central European Jewry was denominated "Ashkenazi" which became an important intellectual, cultural and spiritual center in the Jewish World. The American Jewish Yearbook states the total Jewish population of Europe only, at about 9.5 million in 1933. From which the largest concentration was in Eastern Europe 6,760,000 m. including mainly: Poland 3,000,000 m., the former Soviet Union 2,525,000 m., Czechoslovakia 357,000 and Lithuania 155,000. Jews first settled in Poland in the 11th c. This country leaded with the largest concentration of Jews until the Holocaust. By the eve of WW2, the Jewish population there reached 3.3 million people. By the end of the Holocaust, only 300,000 Jews remained in Poland and today there are 8000.

Before the Holocaust E. European communities had countless functioning synagogues, built both in wood and in masonry, from the late 16th to the early 20th century.

At the beginning of the 20th century, synagogues served different official spiritual trends in Judaism: Hasidism, Anti-Hasidism and the Reform movement. Furthermore, "clandestine" Zionist synagogues were also established, and later recognized by the official trends. There were separate synagogues with totally different architecture and design according to the religious conceptions of each trend. Sometimes on the contrary, members of the various religious currents prayed and learned under the same roof. This happened usually owed to the lack of financial resources of the community.

At the turn of the century, grand synagogues were built on the main avenues of a considered number of cities, next to other important institutions, as symbols of the successful social status of the Jews among the local communities.

In the prewar period, East-European Jewish communities were well-organized and enjoyed prosperity and creativeness, a large number of synagogues were already constructed in monumental forms and in a wide variety of historical styles. Showing the cultural mingling of Jews and their environments and bearing the manifestation of the eclectic style and tendencies of that time. Through the architecture and style of the synagogue we could learn a chapter on the emancipation of Jewish communities.

Thus, synagogues became the finest expression of a cultural interaction process and Jews as well as non-Jews profited from it. Numbers of synagogues increased as the Jewish population grew. The prevailing role of the synagogue remained as the center of spiritual life of the community and its members, fulfilling all the functions mentioned above.

During the Holocaust, about 6 million Jews were brutally massacred by the Germans and their collaborators. In addition to this terrible genocide, Jewish sacred sites: synagogues and cemeteries were desecrated, destroyed and looted. The synagogue, the second home of the Jew, was gone. An institution that for centuries had become a witness of the suffering and happiness of the community and of the individual, as well as serving as a medium through which Jewish tradition and heritage is transmitted from generation to generation as a golden chain. Thousands of synagogues were completely destroyed. The desecration and destruction of synagogues was a carefully planned operation, executed with utmost thoroughness. Usually, synagogues were burned out or bombed by the Germans immediately following the occupation of the city. Frequently Jews were obliged to remain in the synagogue undernourished and tortured for several days or weeks, and then burned together with the synagogue. Often Jews themselves were forced to burn their own synagogues or to dismantle them stone by stone. Countless synagogues were turned into warehouses, bordellos, stables etc. by the Germans and their collaborators. Some of the partly destroyed synagogues survived in different stages of damage and just a few remained relatively complete. The building materials of the destroyed synagogues or their remnants were used for other purposes like for instance, stones served as material for paving of roads or for building house apartments; iron too was utilized and served for the weapon industry.

As for the vast numbers of ritual or synagogal objects, these were looted, stolen or completely destroyed. Sometimes ritual objects were hidden by members of the community and finally saved. According to the Encyclopedia Judaica, it is estimated that 98% of movable Jewish art treasures in Poland disappeared during the war.

Besides the famous collection of Judaica items confiscated from Bohemia and Moravia by the Germans, who sent it to Prague for storage, systematical cataloging and exhibition. They intended to utilize this collection for a "Central Museum of the defunct Jewish Race".

Destroyed Synagogues in Poland and Lithuania

Most of the synagogues in East-European communities were destroyed during the Holocaust. It's difficult to grasp the number of these "architectonic victims" of vandalism.

The destroyed synagogues "live" still in the memories of the survivors. Some of them still recall with tears the moment whenever they saw their synagogue burning or bombed.

Famous Jewish religious centers where once stood large magnificent synagogues were completely destroyed by Germans.

Some synagogues remain forever registered in visual or written records: historical photographs, post cards, drawings or engravings, marked on maps or city plans or mentioned in different historical or literary sources. These are mute testimonies to once proud and affluent communities. These recordings are the sole remnants of the synagogues that disappeared.
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Old July 8th, 2010, 01:31 AM   #66
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Těšnov train station in Prague (1875 - 1985)

No replacement (there's just a park today), the left wing was in the way of the North-South highway (which itself is today considered as a bad idea). The departure hall in the centre and the right wing could remain, so complete useless demolition





today:

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Old July 8th, 2010, 10:30 AM   #67
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Minsk.....
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Old July 9th, 2010, 03:47 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earthbound View Post
Těšnov train station in Prague (1875 - 1985)

No replacement (there's just a park today), the left wing was in the way of the North-South highway (which itself is today considered as a bad idea). The departure hall in the centre and the right wing could remain, so complete useless demolition





today:

Wow, now that's very sad. It was such a lovely building. Of course, on the bright side, you guys demolish alot less of your historic structures than we do here in the US and Ohio. We demolished our beautiful station for a butt ugly convention center and parking!
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Old June 19th, 2011, 01:07 PM   #69
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Examples from Budapest, Hungary

The Palace Haas on Vörösmarty Square





It was burned out in WW2, and demolished just after the war. The site remained empty, and used as a car park till



Then in 1971 built here the office building "ORI".



It was demolished between 2003 and 2005, and replaced with an office-apartement and commercial building, the "V1" in 2009-2010.



--------------------------------------

Szervita square, church and friary. The friary was partially damaged in WW2, but it was demolished until the 1970s, and replaced with this office-building in 1977.



--------------------------------------

The National Theater (former so called "folktheater") on Blaha Lujza Square. It was built in 1875, by architects Fellner and Hellmer.









It was demolished in 1964, because the construction of metro line 2, although it's disputed then and today this act was weel-founded or not.









Now, its site is empty. A new National Theater was built, south from the city center, on the riverbank of the Danube.

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Old June 19th, 2011, 01:24 PM   #70
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Examples from Budapest, Hungary - part2

Kálvin Square. One of the most harmed Square by WW2.

Before 1944-45:







After WW2, in the 50s and 60s





And the construction site of the station of metro line 3, in the 70s



And the buildings today:





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Old June 19th, 2011, 05:45 PM   #71
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This is a really eye-opening thread, it's interesting how people used to think and the values they had - very surprised about what happened in Budapest, didn't know it sustained a lot of wartime damage - still a very beautiful city though.
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Old June 19th, 2011, 06:05 PM   #72
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Ostend (belgium) in the past







Ostend Now








Looks at this beautiful building




Now..


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Old June 19th, 2011, 07:28 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
This is a really eye-opening thread, it's interesting how people used to think and the values they had - very surprised about what happened in Budapest, didn't know it sustained a lot of wartime damage - still a very beautiful city though.
About wartime damages of Budapest may it's worth to see that one. The video is of course contains some example of replacement buildings and strucktures:

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Old June 19th, 2011, 07:31 PM   #74
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At least Budapest's replacement buildings aren't hideous 70s boxes. It doesn't look so bad with the glass. Still sad, but not as bad as here in Canada, where we tear down everything and replacement it with brutalism.

This isn't from Europe, but:

Ugly old art gallery in Edmonton:


Replaced with:



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Old June 20th, 2011, 01:11 AM   #75
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Budapest

Elevátor
built: 1893
architect: Ulrich Keresztély
style: industrial historicism
destroyed: 1945 ruined - 1949 demolished

1893:


1940:


1945:


now:



Ganz Building
built: 1862-64
architect: Ybl Miklós
style: neorenaissance
destroyed: 1945

~1900:


now:



Haas Palace
built: 1873
architect: Linzbauer István
style: neorenaissance
destroyed: 1945 ruined - 1959 demolished

1896:


now:



Grand Hotel Hungária
built: 1868–1871
architect: Szkalnitzky Antal
style: neorenaissance
destroyed: 1945

1880:


~1900:


now:



National Theatre
built: 1873
architect: Szkalnitzky Antal
style: neorenaissance
destroyed: 1945

1873:


1890:


now:



Lloyd Palace
built: 1827–1828
architect: Hild József
style: classicist
destroyed: 1945 ruined - 1948 demolished

~1830:


1877:


1946:


now:



General Staff Building
built: 1895–1897
architect: Kallina Mór
style: neorenaissance
destroyed: 1945

1896:


~1900:


1945:


now:



Palace of archduke József
built: 18th century, rebuilt: 1890
architect: Giergl Kálmán, Korb Flóris
style: neorenaissance (before 1890: Late Baroque)
destroyed: 1945

1889:


~1900:


1944:


now:



Regnum Marianum Catholic church
built: 1925
architect: Kotsis Iván
style: Romanesque Revival
destroyed: 1951 (for Stalin's birthday)

plan:


1930:


1952 (Stalin statue):



1956:



1969 (The Dictatorship of the Proletariat statue):


now:



Saint Demeter Serbian orthodox church
built: 1751
architect: Nöpauer Máté
style: baroque
destroyed: 1949

1890:


1920:


1940:


1945:




1949:


1965:


now:



Buda garrison church (ex Mary Magdalene)
built: 13th century
architect: -
style: gothic, baroque
destroyed: 1945 ruined, 1952 destroyed

1541:


1598:


~1900:


1945:


now:

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Old June 20th, 2011, 07:04 AM   #76
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Hey blogen! The National Theater by Szkalnitzky Antal on Kerepesi Street isn't destroyed in 1945. It was demolished together with the apartment house in 1913.

(Anyway, very good selection)
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Old June 20th, 2011, 01:42 PM   #77
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Milano

before


after



old centrale station




demolished in the '20 and replaced with this



piazza Missori

this little elegant church


has been replaced with this crap

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Old June 20th, 2011, 01:50 PM   #78
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One from Oslo:

The English Quarter
image hosted on flickr

Full size version of the picture: http://www.flickr.com/photos/iammadf...n/photostream/

The English Quarter was a luxurious apartment complex at Solli Plass in Oslo. It was inspired by the historic english row houses you will find in areas such as Kensington in London (hence the name) and it was said to be something unique in Scandinavia. The complex was drawn by german born Bernard Steckmest and norwegian Paul Due. These two architects where among the busiest in Oslo at the time, and stood behind several luxurious complex such as Victoria Terrasse and the Paris Quarter on the other side of the square.









The building was held in French Renaissance. This building in Huitfeldts Gate, Oslo is said to have a similar style:


The complex was later converted into offices and felt into disrepair. It was decided in 1965 that the complex should be demolished to make way for the Index building, a burtalistic highrise designed by the american born architect John Engh. This is today a protected building.


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Old June 21st, 2011, 04:55 PM   #79
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Amazing photos. It's sad to see how most is lost!
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Old June 21st, 2011, 05:10 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1772 View Post
Yes? Sweden was run by social democrats that had an agenda of replacing the odl with the new.
I kind of know, since I'm swedish.
You obviously kinda don´t. For example Norrmalmsregleringen was the work of both social democrats and right- wingers. It´s easy to place the blame on the left now but in reality the right was just as much involved.
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