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Old June 21st, 2010, 09:54 PM   #1
brisavoine
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Preserved Germanic architecture in Alsace-Lorraine

I'm opening this thread to post some randoms pictures that I found on Wikimedia Commons today and that I thought you guys would appreciate. I say random because I post them as they come. I'll post more later over the coming days and weeks. You guys can post some too.

Alsace-Lorraine is one of the Germanic lands that has preserved the most its traditional Germanic architecture, so it's a very interesting case for those who wish to have a glimpse at how Central Europe must have looked before WW2. The reason why the ancient buildings in Alsace-Lorraine have been more preserved than in the rest of Central Europe is because:
a- Alsace-Lorraine was little affected by WW1, despite being a major bone of contention between France and Germany. The regions that were affected by WW1 were Champagne, Picardy, and Flanders, but by sheer luck Alsace-Lorraine saw very little combats.
b- in WW2 the Germans didn't bomb Alsace-Lorraine (contrary to 1870 when the Prussians had not hesitated to bomb Strasbourg and destroy invaluable ancient buildings, including the municipal library that went up in flame with all its Medieval manuscripts).
c- the Allies bombed Alsace-Lorraine much less than Germany and Austria, because it was considered part of France, an Allied country.
and d- after the war the French zeal for the preservation of old buildings and the restoration of buildings damaged during the war was applied in Alsace-Lorraine as in the rest of France, contrary to what happened in Germany where many buildings that could have been restored were simply destroyed.

So let's start our little tour.

First we'll board a TGV from Paris or an ICE from Frankfurt to reach Strasbourg.

[img]http://i46.************/9rt5xf.jpg[/img]

The Maison de Notre-Dame (Frauenhüs in Alsatian), in Strasbourg. It has been the core building of the foundation (or fabric) in charge of constructing and then maintaining and restoring the Cathedral of Strasbourg since the Middle Ages. The left wing was built in 1347. The right wing was built in 1579. The foundation, called Fondation de l’Œuvre Notre-Dame, was incorporated in the 13th century and still exists today.



Colmar (Colmer in Alsatian):


Châtenois (Keschdeholds in Alsatian):


Eguisheim (Egsse in Alsatian)


The Abbey of Murbach (Müerboch in Alsatian), built in the 12th century, is a masterpiece of Rhenish Romanesque architecture:


Obernai (Ewernahn in Alsatian):


Obernai again:


The Temple Neuf, in Metz, built from 1901 to 1904 on the orders of the Kaiser for the Prostetant community of Metz, is an example of Wilhelminian architecture still surviving today:
[img]http://i46.************/72zls4.jpg[/img]

Ribeauvillé (Roppschwihr in Alsatian)


Wissembourg (Weisseburch in South Franconian, the traditional dialect of Wissembourg):


Sainte-Foy church (Sankt Fides Kirch in Alsatian), built in the 12th century in Sélestat (Schledschdot in Alsatian), another masterpiece of Rhenish Romanesque architecture:


Town gate of Bergheim (Barige in Alsatian):


The heavily restored castle of Haut-Kœnigsbourg (d'Kinschburik in Alsatian):


Haut-Kœnigsbourg Castle again:


The "Kollossal" post office in Metz, another example of Wilhelminian architecture:


Porte Haute (Obertor) town gate of Riquewihr (Richewihr in Alsatian), from the 16th century:


Kaysersberg (Kaiserschbari in Alsatian):

Last edited by brisavoine; June 21st, 2010 at 11:09 PM.
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Old June 22nd, 2010, 05:59 PM   #2
Dr.Mabuse
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very very nice
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Old June 22nd, 2010, 07:08 PM   #3
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Well done!
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Old June 22nd, 2010, 10:34 PM   #4
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Let's continue our tour, with more pictures of the Lorraine part of Alsace-Lorraine than yesterday, the Lorraine part where Franconian dialects were spoken and not Alsatian.

The Medieval fortress of Lichtenberg (Liechdeburi in Alsatian) above the village of the same name, in the northern Vosges mountains, on the border between Alsace and Lorraine:


The Romanesque ossuary of Schorbach (Schorboch in the local Rhine Franconian dialect), in the Lorraine part of Alsace-Lorraine. The white things that you can see behind the columns are tens of thousands of human bones that were deposited here from 1136 to the French Revolution (1789). The ossuary, which is located in the churchyard of the village, is in the Romanesque style but it was built only in the 15th century (replacing an older one). During the Middle Ages, Schorbach was the main parish in the region of Bitche, and so it received the corpses of all the people dying in the region, including all the people dying in the much larger city of Bitche (which did not have its own parish and depended from the parish of the small village of Schorbach). The churchyard of Schorbach was way too small to contain the graves of the people dying in the entire region, so the bones of the deceased were periodically unearthed from the churchyard and stored in the ossuary to make room for new burials.



The Metzig, in Molsheim (Molse in Alsatian). Built in the late 16th century, the Metzig was the guildhall of the butchers in Molsheim:


The Pontonniers international high school, in Strasbourg, was built in 1902 in the historicist style that was popular in the German Empire at the time (think of the palaces built by the mad king Louis II of Bavaria for example):


The Protestant church of Philippsbourg (Philippsbuerj in the local Rhine Franconian dialect):
[img]http://i49.************/f54utg.jpg[/img]

The Medieval castle of Malbrouck (Buerg Meinsbersch in the local Luxembourgish Franconian dialect):
[img]http://i50.************/2mwi6j9.jpg[/img]

The castle of Malbrouck again (it is named so in French because the Duke of Malborough set his headquarters in this castle in 1705 during the War of the Spanish Succession, and the French pronounced Malborough as "Malbrouck", but the local name of the castle is Meinsbersch, i.e. Meinsberg in standard German):


The synagogue of Wofisheim (Wolfdse in Alsatian), built in 1897, is an example of Wilhelminian architecture. Made with sandstone from the Vosges, it wasn't damaged during the Nazi occupation of Alsace, by what miracle I don't know.



This mini-Reichstag is the library of the University of Strasbourg. It was built in 1889 to replace the city library that had burnt during the Prussian bombardment of 1870, when the 300,000 books and 3,500 Medieval manuscripts that the city library contained went up in flames.



The village of Riquewihr (Richewihr in Alsatian) is as postcard perfect as it can get:
[img]http://i46.************/k19hc2.jpg[/img]

Gründerzeit architecture in Thionville (Diddenuewen in the local Luxembourgish Franconian dialect):


The post office of Thionville built during the German Empire:
[img]http://i49.************/2n080lw.jpg[/img]

Bitche (Bitsch in the local Rhine Franconian dialect):
[img]http://i49.************/21efz7.jpg[/img]

A wine estate on the slopes overlooking the Moselle River near Apach (Opéch in the local Luxembourgish Franconian dialect):
[img]http://i46.************/2cfpg0.jpg[/img]
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Last edited by brisavoine; December 4th, 2010 at 08:07 PM.
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Old June 23rd, 2010, 01:35 AM   #5
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http://i46.************/2cfpg0.jpg


That house
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Old June 25th, 2010, 03:09 PM   #6
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The post office in Metz and the post office in Strasbourg are very similar



But the main front destroyed during the 2ww, and not rebuilt



http://www.archi-strasbourg.org
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Old June 26th, 2010, 07:04 PM   #7
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Bouxwiller (Buswiller in Alsatian):


Bouxwiller again:


Another street in Bouxwiller:


Barr (Bor in Alsatian):


Betschdorf (Badschdorf in Alsatian):


Medevial house built in 1686 in Dambach-la-Ville (Domboch in Alsatian) by clog maker Alexandre Sermonet, from Savoy, who settled in Alsace after the Thirty Years' War which depopulated Alsace:


A little garden in the Medieval heart of Strasbourg:
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Old June 26th, 2010, 07:52 PM   #8
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I LOVE your photos! Keep up the great work!
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Old June 26th, 2010, 10:00 PM   #9
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So beautiful places...thanks
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Old June 26th, 2010, 11:32 PM   #10
brisavoine
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Siegler house, in Bouxwiller, built in 1670:


Another view of the Siegler house. That's how all the towns and cities of Normandy would look today if the Allies had landed near Calais in 1944 instead of Normandy.


Palace of the (military) governor, in Metz, built in 1902-1905 during the German Empire:
[img]http://i45.************/2utsvw7.jpg[/img]

Kintzheim (Kindse in Alsatian):


An extremely rare survivor from the time of Charlemagne (9th century): the tower of Usselkirch, near the village of Boust (Buscht in Luxembourgish Franconian), in the Lorraine part of Alsace-Lorraine:
[img]http://i50.************/ilm2he.jpg[/img]

A sculpted head dating from the Roman Empire was embeded in the wall:


Seebach in Alsace:


Maison de l'ami Fritz ("House of good old Fritz"), in Wissembourg, built in 1550:


Kaiserliches Landgericht, i.e. "Imperial Regional Court", in Sarreguemines (Saargeminn in the local Rhine Franconian dialect). It was a Capuchin convent built in Baroque style in 1730. Seized during the French Revolution when all the convents and nunneries of France were disbanded, it became the Court of First Instance of Sarreguemines, with jurisdiction over the whole district of Sarreguemines. When Alsace-Lorraine was annexed by Germany in 1870, the Court of First Instance became a Kaiserliches Landgericht. In 1910 the court left the old Capuchin convent and relocated to a new building. The Sœurs de Sainte-Chrétienne congregation then bought the building and set up a private Catholic high-school there, but the Kais. Landgericht inscription remained. In 1918 when the French recovered Alsace-Lorraine they also didn't touch the German inscription, a proof that history is never as black and white as we sometimes imagine.

[img]http://i48.************/25fn0v5.jpg[/img]

In Sarreguemines again, a Jugendstil building from the very last years of the German Empire:
[img]http://i48.************/250mt81.jpg[/img]

Blacksmith shop in Orschwiller, built in 1793:
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Old July 8th, 2010, 01:51 PM   #11
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There is a pretty good.
Its very nice photos. Good work!!
Thanks for sharing.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 07:56 PM   #12
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German imperial architecture on the former Kaiser Wilhelm Ring, now Avenue Foch, in Metz.

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Old December 7th, 2010, 06:01 AM   #13
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Fabulous!
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