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Old August 21st, 2011, 04:41 PM   #61
Tom 958
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What a mess!

Quote:
Gwinnett County: Sugarloaf Parkway extension from Ga. 316 to Ga. 20 (Buford Drive), $296 million
That's the Northern Arc, but with trucks banned so it won't help with freight movement. At least it'd make the currently-under construction segment from GA 20 to GA 316 a bit less useless. Provisions are already being made for its interchange with I-85.

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Preliminary work on a possible light-rail line from Doraville into Gwinnett County, $95 million
I've never understood where this came from and why. A light rail line that requires a transfer to continue to Buckhead, Midtown, and downtown? It might halfway make sense if my own pet project, the I-285 Doraville to Cumberland transit corridor, had made the cut. But it didn't. As far as that goes, there's an unfinished study for that corridor, but without funding for whatever in recommends except for the 285-400 interchange.

In a sane city, the roads component would be funded through taxes on road users, including development impact fees. Instead, everyone pays to subsidize further sprawl.

It's very likely that I'll be voting no.
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Old September 1st, 2011, 03:54 AM   #63
Professor L Gee
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Is there any legitimate reason not to extend the existing MARTA line into Gwinnett instead of making it light rail?
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Old September 1st, 2011, 04:36 AM   #64
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The newly-refurbished cars are spiffy but the stations look worn-out.
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Old September 1st, 2011, 09:52 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by Professor L Gee View Post
Is there any legitimate reason not to extend the existing MARTA line into Gwinnett instead of making it light rail?
Light rail is cheaper to build per mile compared with heavy rail, and the Federal Transit Administration has tended to favor funding new light rail lines over heavy rail lines.

That being said I believe the Gwinnett County Chamber of Commerce wanted to extend the existing MARTA line into Gwinnett County rather than build a completely separate light rail line so that may change.
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Old September 2nd, 2011, 02:08 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
One of the most important properties is travel without transfer, or not more then one transfer. For this quality of service, Acworth to Conyers need to be one line, for example.
Other important thing is dense network of bus lines (to have stop everywhere not further then 6-7 min. walk) and frequent service (<=15min. interval).
In some cities in North America there is name BRT for simple dedicated lanes. That is cheap and useful solution, to improve existing public transport, but it is pointless to call it "rapid transit".
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Old September 2nd, 2011, 09:54 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Light rail is cheaper to build per mile compared with heavy rail, and the Federal Transit Administration has tended to favor funding new light rail lines over heavy rail lines.

That being said I believe the Gwinnett County Chamber of Commerce wanted to extend the existing MARTA line into Gwinnett County rather than build a completely separate light rail line so that may change.
That would be nice.
Yeah, light rail is cheaper to build than heavy rail... but at the same time, it just seems to make more sense to extend an already-present heavy rail line than to abruptly change modes.

I know they're still studying how to extend the Green Line in Baltimore (their one subway line), and one of the alternatives is BRT.
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Old September 3rd, 2011, 05:02 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor L Gee View Post
That would be nice.
Yeah, light rail is cheaper to build than heavy rail... but at the same time, it just seems to make more sense to extend an already-present heavy rail line than to abruptly change modes.
I think it's a Gwinnett thing. There's still massive opposition to MARTA out here. I really have no idea where the light rail proposal came from. Some bigwig's pipe dream, I guess. That kind of thing happens a lot here. The best example would be the Marietta-Lawrenceville ("Mari-Larry") study, which came about on a whim to build a light rail line along GA 120 from Marietta to Lawrenceville with no connection to any other rail. Unsurprisingly, the study found that running it along the Interstates via Perimeter Center was a much better idea, and that light rail to anywhere near Lawenceville was a total nonstarter.

(I already said this ) One of the many annoying aspects of the sales tax proposal is that it apparently trashes a major opportunity to fund something major in the 285 top end corridor. The Revive 285 study has been going on for years but still hasn't identified a preferred alternative, and if the sales tax is passed per the current proposal, I don't see where the funding would come from, especially for any transit element.

One of the alternatives calls for provision for light rail in the corridor. That combined with the Gwinnett light rail line might halfway makes sense, since it'd provide a one-seat ride to Perimeter Center and the Galleria area and two transfer options to MARTA's heavy rail.

Another possible option: I was reading up on MARTA's site about the proposed connection to Emory University, and one idea was for a line that could accommodate both heavy and light rail, with heavy rail service ending at Emory and light rail continuing along a nonsensical route to Avondale Station. I've been thinking for years: Might it be feasible to build a light rail line with cars that are dimensionally compatible with MARTA station platforms and have them run on the existing heavy rail system as well as the new light rail line?

It's just a thought.

Also: did anyone other than me notice how the Beltline is drawn on the map above, replacing the southeast and northwest segments with an east-west link along (I guess) Tenth Street? I wonder if that has any official status. So far, I see no indication that it has, though it's fun to think about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rail_serbia
One of the most important properties is travel without transfer, or not more then one transfer. For this quality of service, Acworth to Conyers need to be one line, for example.
Or Acworth to central Gwinnett via Emory.

Last edited by Tom 958; September 3rd, 2011 at 05:12 PM.
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Old September 3rd, 2011, 10:08 PM   #69
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Flat wheel, 0'18"!

For an airport-serving network, just where are the passengers?!?
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Old September 4th, 2011, 02:27 AM   #70
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For an airport-serving network, just where are the passengers?!?
When I've ridden it to/from the airport, most of the passengers were employees. I suppose dependability and accessibility are issues.

Still, it's not entirely hopeless. According to the chart you'll find here, we still have more passengers per mile than Chicago MTA, BART or LA.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 12:01 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom 958 View Post
When I've ridden it to/from the airport, most of the passengers were employees. I suppose dependability and accessibility are issues.
...
I think this is the reality for most transit lines that serve airports. If you have more than an overnight bag, a taxi cab becomes an attractive option. The cost savings of using public transit just isn't worth the hassle of maneuvering suitcases on and off crowded trains and buses.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 10:26 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nature's message View Post
What event must've finished or venue emptied out, coz none of these folks appears to be commuting?





Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
What fraction of any old day's service is rewarded with full-length trains?




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Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Superb photo Space doesn't seem to be an issue there, yet...
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Old September 5th, 2011, 01:03 AM   #73
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Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
What event must've finished or venue emptied out, coz none of these folks appears to be commuting?
I did not take those photos so I would not know but Five Points is relatively close to Turner Field (where the Atlanta Braves play). Since it is also a major transfer point many people use the station to get to the Georgia Dome, Georgia World Congress Center, and Phillips Arena as well.
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Old September 7th, 2011, 07:15 PM   #74
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Wanna bet passengers changing trains weren't whom was being photographed although I agree that the majority of them must've just exited some sport event.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 10:34 PM   #75
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ATLANTA | Public Transport

IMO this is very exciting for the city of Atlanta, they're starting to embrace expansion of their public transportation system!


Here comes the Atlanta streetcar: MARTA sets bus detours

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By David Ibata
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

MARTA has announced changes to seven bus routes, effective Saturday, in downtown Atlanta to make way for construction of the $72 million streetcar line from Centennial Olympic Park to the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site.

The changes affect Route Nos. 1 – Centennial Olympic Park/Coronet Way; 3 – Martin Luther King Jr. Drive/Auburn Avenue; 16 – Noble; 99 – Boulevard/Monroe Drive; 110 Peachtree Street “The Peach”; 155 Windsor Street/Lakewood Avenue; and 186 – Rainbow Drive/South DeKalb.

The changes will remain in effect until further notice. Details of the reroutes are posted on this MARTA website.

Atlanta received $47 million in federal funds in July for the streetcar project. The Atlanta Downtown Improvement District will pick up the $25 million cost not covered by the federal government.

When the system begins operations, scheduled for 2013, four streetcars will circulate on the 12-station, 2.7-mile route, with a transfer point to MARTA at the Peachtree Center rail station.

Atlanta city officials hope the line will rejuvenate downtown and the Auburn and Edgewood Avenue corridors, and perhaps pave the way for a system that eventually would operate along the length of Peachtree Street and link to a light rail or streetcar system operating along the planned Beltline.

-- Staff writer Bill Steiden contributed to this article.

http://georgiatransitconnector.com/

http://georgiatransitconnector.com/about/route/
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Old October 12th, 2011, 09:16 PM   #76
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The Transport politic

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In Atlanta and Seattle, Hope for Better Transit Through Referendums

Recognizing the limitations of federal aid, local leaders in Atlanta and Seattle propose tax increases or additional fees to improve the quality of their transit networks.

Despite the skepticism about the importance of government spending now enthralling Washington on both sides of the aisle, the perceived value of investing local resources in public facilities such as new transit lines seems only to be ramping up.

Take Atlanta and Seattle, sitting at the helm of the nation’s 9th and 15th-largest metropolitan areas, respectively. In the first, a regional initiative supported by political and business leaders across a ten-county area will advance a 1% sales tax to the ballot next November. Over half of the billions in locally raised funds is proposed to be transferred to transit capital and operational programs. In the second, an enthusiastic mayor is articulating a grand, citywide strategy to bring high-quality transit to his city as quickly as possible. If approved by voters, a significant increase in the vehicle registration fee could mean rapid streetcars and more bus rapid transit.

If this is the face of the future of transit funding, then supporters of improved public transportation offerings may have reasons for optimism. In contrast to Washington, municipal and regional groups, convinced that today’s infrastructure is underperforming, are pushing forward — alone.

Atlanta’s referendum, if passed by voters in the 4.1 million-person, 10-county region covered by the Atlanta Regional Commission, would represent the most significant expansion of the area’s transit system since the creation of MARTA in 1971. After state legislation was passed last year to allow the region to ask its voters whether they wanted to increase their own taxes, a “Regional Roundtable” comprised of elected officials was established to determine how exactly to spend the estimated $6.1 billion that will be raised by a 1% sales tax over the course of ten years. Though the final list has yet to be completed (that will not happen until October), 54% of the funds noted in the preliminary list would go to transit (the rest mostly directed towards highway expansion).

The projects suggested for funding range from general support for suburban bus operations in Clayton and Gwinnett Counties to $600 million for state of good repair upgrades for existing MARTA lines to significant expansions of the heavy rail network. Of those, several are particularly exciting: $658 million of the $1.55 billion in total costs for the Beltline light rail corridor; $700 million for a link along the Clifton Corridor between Lindbergh Station and Emory University, expected to cost $1.11 billion; and $879 million of $1.23 billion for a light rail line from Midtown’s Arts Center to Cumberland Mall in northwest Atlanta. In general, these are good projects: Unlike several others proposed by exurban counties in the region, they are aimed towards upgrading transit links in the urban core, where rail investments will be most cost effective.


Not everyone will be completely satisfied, however long the list: DeKalb County politicians have argued that they will actively fight against the tax’s passage if their preferred rail line, an extension of MARTA five miles south from the existing Indian Creek terminus on the east side of the system to Wesley Chapel Road and I-20, if not included in the plan. That threat is likely to be heeded in order to maintain the regional collaboration that appears necessary to support this referendum (it can only pass with a majority of votes across the metropolitan area, not in one municipality at a time). Supported projects must reach as much of the taxed zone as possible. Otherwise, this once-in-a-generation opportunity to expand the transit system could be lost

[...]
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Old October 12th, 2011, 09:20 PM   #77
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Old October 12th, 2011, 10:09 PM   #78
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I don't understand revivals at running trams down streets
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Old November 15th, 2011, 12:45 AM   #79
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Saporta Report

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Atlanta Streetcar aims to meet federal completion deadline of May 2013 with help from city

Date: November 13th, 2011
By David Pendered

Legislation needed to build the Atlanta Streetcar is starting to move swiftly through Atlanta City Hall, including a proposal to allow Peachtree Street to be blocked during rush hours of the 18-month construction period.

This week, three measures to provide for the streetcar’s construction are expected to be approved by the Transportation Committee of the Atlanta City Council. If approved, the council may consider them at its Nov. 21 meeting.

These efforts and others intend to allow the city to meet the federally imposed completion deadline of May 2013. Construction sometimes may go on 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to meet that deadline, according to city documents.

Just last week, the council considered a $10.7 million allocation for the streetcar. The money would pay for the relocation of water and sewer utilities, and to add enhancements related to the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists along the streetcar route.

The council also considered a proposal to lease almost 2 acres for a streetcar maintenance barn and parking area beneath the Downtown Connector, between Auburn and Edgewood avenues.


The route of the Atlanta Streetcar through Downtown Atlanta. Credit: Atlanta Streetcar.

These measures and others underscore the complexity of constructing the infrastructure necessary for the streetcar to operate along the planned 2.7-mile length through the central business district.

Here’s how that infrastructure is described in the environmental analysis completed for the project:

“Streetcars would travel and board passengers in mixed traffic along existing streets.

“Continuous welded rail would be embedded in existing streets using a shallow-slab construction method.

“The streetcar service would be powered using electric propulsion and supported by an overhead contact wire system.

“Special transit signal phases would facilitate the efficient operation of streetcar vehicles through signalized intersections.”

That’s a lot of work, and the clock is ticking toward the May 2013 deadline. Construction was to start by the end of this year, according to city documents.

[...]
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Old November 15th, 2011, 07:57 PM   #80
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A line consisting of just 6 stops per direction seems ridiculouse. Waste of money. Who's gonna ride it? It should conect suburbs with city center not just serve few blocks!
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