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Old July 15th, 2010, 08:20 AM   #41
diablo234
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My car (I drive a 2001 Toyota Corolla) has daytime running lights as well which is a pretty nice feature. When it gets dark out the headlights automatically brighten. I don't see why they are not standard in every car sold in the U.S.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 09:54 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I-275westcoastfl View Post
That is a Volvo issue, I remember looking at an S40 and it was a typical problem I found with Volvo's from that time.


Well I agree but in North America it's a bit different than in Europe. It doesn't make sense to own a European car here unless you happen to be loaded and know you will have a new car in a year or two. VW's here are known for bad auto transmissions and electric problems, they are poor quality and use inferior parts from being built in Mexico. BMW is crap as well I have seen BMW's from only 4-8 years ago with interior materials falling apart, transmission problems, electric problems, etc. Mercedes Benz is hit or miss but overall good quality especially in higher up models. Audi is a great manufacturer but suffers from some VW issues. From my experience certain American cars are actually better to own in America, they are cheap to maintain, easier to work on than Japanese cars, and I've a lotmet people who have also mostly gone in for routine work. The newer American cars are even better quality and have better design and quality than many Japanese cars in our market and they are cheaper as well, win win.


I should add that DRL's are very simple to remove, in most cases you just remove a fuse and they won't come on, you can even go as far as to remove the module.
It's anecdotal of course, but my mother, my brother and I have had very good luck with VWs going back 25 years.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 04:19 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Tiburon View Post
Does Virginia law say that if you turn on the wipers you have to turn on the lights? Or is that like a rule of thumb for people to know that if it's raining hard enough to turn on the wipers it must be dark enough to turn on the lights?

In Florida, the law doesn't say anything about wipers. You may use the wipers as an indicator that if there is rain, you must turn the lights on. This is Florida's law:

316.217 When lighted lamps are required.--

(1) Every vehicle operated upon a highway within this state shall display lighted lamps and illuminating devices as herein respectively required for different classes of vehicles, subject to exceptions with respect to parked vehicles, under the following conditions;

(a) At any time from sunset to sunrise including the twilight hours. Twilight hours shall mean the time between sunset and full night or between full night and sunrise.

(b) During any rain, smoke, or fog.


(c) Stop lights, turn signals, and other signaling devices shall be lighted as prescribed for use of such devices.
Code of Virginia § 46.2-1030
Quote:
A. Every vehicle in operation on a highway in the Commonwealth shall display lighted headlights and illuminating devices as required by this article (i) from sunset to sunrise, (ii) during any other time when, because of rain, smoke, fog, snow, sleet, insufficient light, or other unfavorable atmospheric conditions, visibility is reduced to a degree whereby persons or vehicles on the highway are not clearly discernible at a distance of 500 feet, and (iii) whenever windshield wipers are in use as a result of fog, rain, sleet, or snow. The provisions of this subsection, however, shall not apply to instances when windshield wipers are used intermittently in misting rain, sleet, or snow.
... ...
D. The failure to display lighted headlights and illuminating devices under the conditions set forth in clause (iii) of subsection A of this section shall not constitute negligence per se, nor shall violation of clause (iii) of subsection A of this section constitute a defense to any claim for personal injury or recovery of medical expenses for injuries sustained in a motor vehicle accident.

E. No demerit points shall be assessed for failure to display lighted headlights and illuminating devices during periods of fog, rain, sleet, or snow in violation of clause (iii) of subsection A of this section.

F. No citation for a violation of clause (iii) of subsection A of this section shall be issued unless the officer issuing such citation has cause to stop or arrest the driver of such motor vehicle for the violation of some other provision of this Code or local ordinance relating to the operation, ownership, or maintenance of a motor vehicle or any criminal statute.
http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp...+cod+46.2-1030
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Old July 15th, 2010, 08:58 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
It's anecdotal of course, but my mother, my brother and I have had very good luck with VWs going back 25 years.
You are one of the few then, I know some VW's were still imported from Germany so I know those would be better quality. But most people I have met, stuff I've read online, and personal experience has shown that even VW's when bought brand new break a lot and even worse is the customer service of VW USA.
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Old July 16th, 2010, 04:54 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I-275westcoastfl View Post
The newer American cars are even better quality and have better design and quality than many Japanese cars in our market
Now after that nice intermission of some industrial fiction I would like to remind the gathered that the topic reads "Headlights on with oncoming traffic".

Thank you.
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Old July 16th, 2010, 08:39 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LMB View Post
Now after that nice intermission of some industrial fiction I would like to remind the gathered that the topic reads "Headlights on with oncoming traffic".

Thank you.
Well, speaking as the one who started the topic, I'd be perfectly willing for the title to be expanded to cover running lights.
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Old July 17th, 2010, 05:09 AM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LMB View Post
Now after that nice intermission of some industrial fiction I would like to remind the gathered that the topic reads "Headlights on with oncoming traffic".

Thank you.
Like topics have never gone off topic before..
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Old July 17th, 2010, 12:02 PM   #48
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Many Oregonians drive with their lights on, especially during our dark overcast drizzly/rainy season, it makes you more visible, and we have safety corridors that ask you to turn on your lights.
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Old December 12th, 2010, 02:04 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Tiburon View Post
I understand that Europe and Canada have nanny-state mindsets where the government is supposed to keep you "safe" and tell you what's best for you and that mindset is slowly creeping into the United States, but I think that each car owner should be able to decide with a switch like the one in some Japanese cars sold in the U.S. that have auto headlights with switchable DRL's and on/off positions. I prefer lights on in bad weather and two-lane highways without medians, but the DRL's do cause glare specially when too many cars are on the road.
I agree, and the worst nanny-state in the world is Sweden

yes, traffic jams with DRL cause glare, it is extremly annoying. It's difficult to convince the already DRL-salvated about that.

One more thing: DRL-cars wear out the headlight-glass much faster than non DRL-cars !!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzzy Llama View Post
Back on topic - in Poland until couple of years ago headlights were mandatory only in October-March period, now the new law requires you to keep them on all time. I like this behaviour for three reasons - in densely packed downtown streets it's easier to see which car is on the move and which one is parked, it's easier to spot an oncoming car when you're crossing/joining a priority road and it's handy when the weather is crappy (before the new law it was mandatory to use the lights in bad weather conditions as well, but surprisingly large percentage of drivers didn't bother to turn them on)
didn't know this, that is sad. Same thing in Finland where DRL first was compulsary only on rural roads, but this changed in 1996, when DRL became mandatory everywhere 24/7.

Although use of DRL is not 100% as in Sweden, in Finland it's more common with no-lights daytime. Finns are more disobedient than swedes.

Last edited by Magnus Brage; December 12th, 2010 at 02:11 AM.
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Old June 18th, 2012, 07:46 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
[Moderators: I couldn't find an existing topic that would cover this. If there is one to fold it into, please do so.]

At one point in Maryland I pass through regularly (a two-by-two undivided stretch of US 1 bypassing Bel Air) signage appeared about a year ago ordering people to turn on their headlights. The first sign says something like "two-way traffic - headlights required," so clearly the fact that there's two-way traffic at relatively high speed (the limit's 55 m.p.h., I think) is their rationale for doing this. (Then there are signs threatening fines if you don't turn your lights on...and at the end an "End mandatory headlight use.")

Had never seen this anywhere else until yesterday, when I came across the same phenomenon on US 15 between Leesburg, Virginia, and its junction with US 340 (where 15 becomes a freeway) near Frederick, Maryland. On both the Virginia and Maryland stretches.

So now I'm mildly curious - is this a Maryland novelty that's starting to spread? Something that's been normal in other parts of the U.S., or other countries, for years?

It would be unnecessary in Canada, I imagine, with most cars having running liights....
Old thread, but here's an update for the OP...

The reason the Bel Air Bypass has the headlight law is because speeds are high for a two lane road - it's a highway - and people kept crossing the center line. Final straw was a few years back when there was a bad fatal wreck, and now some of the stretch without a median has a guardrail separating traffic. The headlight restrictions are still in place, but mostly unnecessary now.
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Old June 18th, 2012, 03:38 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I always have my lights on and never had to replace one in the last 45,000 kilometers.
Having your lights on on a voluntary basis is a very Dutch thing to do. Whenever I drive on the A6 in France, and I look at traffic coming from the other side, you can pick out the Dutch from a mile away. They always have their lights on!
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Old June 19th, 2012, 03:12 AM   #52
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Having your lights on on a voluntary basis is a very Dutch thing to do. Whenever I drive on the A6 in France, and I look at traffic coming from the other side, you can pick out the Dutch from a mile away. They always have their lights on!
Lol. Spot-on I'd say. I'm Dutch, I moved from the Netherlands to Australia over four years ago and was so used to driving with my lights on 24/7 that I basically just imported this habbit. I was one of the very few (even when it was raining most drivers refused to turn their lights on). People asked me what the heck I was thinking, whereupon I patiently explained them that there's ample scientific evidence that lights on 24/7 improves traffic safety. Although I'm not sure whether there's any correlation with lights on 24/7, the fact of the matter is that the Netherlands have a far better road safety record than Australia. Anyway, interestingly, I've noticed that over the past couple of years at least where I live (SE Queensland) the number of drivers having lights on 24/7 has steadily increased (my guess is from virtually zero up until approximately 5 per cent). I like to think it's because of my missionary work, but I guess it's rather because most imported European cars as well as some more expensive Australian cars have standard day-time running lights (DRL) installed. Monkey see, monkey do...
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Old June 19th, 2012, 09:00 PM   #53
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Certain California highways have been declared "Daylight Safety Sections" where headlight use is mandatory. These sections of highway usually have a higher-than-average rate of accidents (especially head-ons) and there are two such safety sections near where I live. California Route 152 east of Gilroy is a 2-lane conventional highway (55 MPH limit) that has had a history of fatal head-on collisions. California Route 17 between Los Gatos and Scotts Valley is a 4-lane mostly divided highway (50 MPH limit) that has a very high accident rate because it has numerous blind curves as it traverses the Santa Cruz Mountains.

California also has a "Wipers On, Headlights On" law that went into effect a couple of years ago. The law basically reads if you wipers are on, then you must turn on your headlights. The reason for this is to increase your visibility to other drivers. Unfortunately, many drivers still ignore this law but the CHP and other law enforcement officers are starting to issue tickets.

In both cases (Daylight Safety and Wipers), using daytime running lights is not sufficient because your tail lights are not on when the daytime running lights are on. Tail lights are important for the Wipers law because it does increase your visibility to drivers behind you.
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Old June 20th, 2012, 12:20 AM   #54
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I also always keep my lights on, my first car was a Volvo and I got used to always running dipped beams and after that I just turned on my headlights in every car regardless of weather.

Can't say I've had problems with glare or anyone using DRL or dipped beams, only lights that occasionally annoy me are badly set up xenons in my mirror or excessively bright brake lights ( like on E46 BMW's, the LED ones, highly annoying in the Maccy D's drive through.) and in extreme situations, badly set up conventional lights at night. Glare though ? Only a problem with low sun or in very dark places tbh, even good polarized sunglasses won't fix an annoying low sun in your face...

Having to replace them more often is a no issue imho, a set of H4 or H7 lights are only 2 euros in budget shops like Big Bazar or Action... It's only a couple moments of work to replace them in most cars too.
Think I replace a headlight once per year or so...

Last edited by snowdog; June 20th, 2012 at 12:27 AM.
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Old June 20th, 2012, 03:31 AM   #55
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I'm not aware of any laws requiring people to drive with their lights on dip all day because of traffic, although many people do so anyway (and I can tell who is from the North Island and who isn't simply because a lot of North Islanders drive with their headlights on dip). However, there is legislation prohibiting people from driving with fog lamps or yellow lights on their vehicles.
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Old June 20th, 2012, 04:11 AM   #56
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There is at least one other "super-2" in Maryland - MD 90, the Ocean City Expressway, between US 50 near Berlin and the 62nd Street Bridge in Ocean City. That highway also requires daytime headlights its entire length. Most of the sections on land now have guardrails separating oncoming traffic, but the long bridges are undivided.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Route_90

The longest bridge crosses Assawoman Bay. That name is always good for a few chuckles.
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Old September 28th, 2014, 01:50 PM   #57
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If using lights during the day, why use the headlights ? The headlights glow more than necessary to spot the cars during the day. The headlights are designed to increase visibility during poor view conditions like during the night, dusk, dawn, heavy rain.

I think the LEDs on most new cars are good enough and they save fuel too.

You see the LED-lights and spot the moving car without any necessary glare.


In the city during the day at low speed, cars can be seen even without any lights.


Can you spot the Opel Vectra ??

In the USA, there seems to be many rules about headlights, some of them rather farfetched.

"More obscure requirements include Pennsylvania, which requires drivers to turn on their headlights in construction zones, while Alaska requires headlights at speeds above 45 mph on designated highways."



The colour of the vehicles also determine visibility. Here I clearly spot the white car without lights, while the darkblue car is more obscured although with the lights turned on.

Last edited by NordikNerd; September 28th, 2014 at 02:04 PM.
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Old September 28th, 2014, 02:13 PM   #58
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It does make a difference if you're in northern Europe or central Europe when using lights in daytime. Hence the fact that it is law in all Scandinavian countries...
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Old September 28th, 2014, 05:40 PM   #59
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Headlights must be turned on 24/7 in Estonia also, although the DRLs of newer vehicles are also fine. It actually became law in early 2000s in Estonia that all new vehicles sold had to have automatic headlights i.e. the lights turned on when you turned on the engine, even if the light switch was in the "0" position.
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Old September 28th, 2014, 05:55 PM   #60
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But it's still true dat with new vehicles in Scandinavia and the Baltics that day lights are sufficient, right? ...meaning not full dipped headlights, but one level below and no lights on on the rear of the vehicle...

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