daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 28th, 2007, 04:54 AM   #61
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

For information on planning for the Green Line extension to Somerville, visit the following links:

http://www.somervillestep.org/

http://www.greenlineextension.org/

http://www.eot.state.ma.us/default.a...eExt&sid=about

Last edited by greg_christine; December 28th, 2007 at 04:59 AM.
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 28th, 2007, 05:09 AM   #62
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

http://www.boston.com/news/local/art...s_state_boost/

Plan for stretching Blue Line to Lynn gets state boost

By John Laidler
Globe Correspondent / December 13, 2007

The decades-old vision of extending the MBTA Blue Line to Lynn got a fresh boost when the Patrick administration recently proposed state planning money for the project.

The Blue Line extension is among three rail and mass transit projects authorized to receive a combined $100 million in planning funds in Governor Deval Patrick's $2.9 billion transportation bond bill filed Nov. 29.

Bringing the Blue Line north to Lynn from its current terminus at Wonderland Station in Revere has been a dream of Lynn political and business leaders for many years, and one they have actively pushed since 1993. The city sees rapid transit service as a key to its economic revival.

Mayor Edward J. "Chip" Clancy Jr. of Lynn called the funding authorization for the project in the governor's bill "great news," noting it would help match the federal funding that has already been provided for the project's planning costs.

"It would be a great boon for the whole North Shore," said Clancy, who fought for the Blue Line extension during his years as a state senator. "This is our way to connect with the outside world."

The funding proposal comes as state officials work to complete a draft environmental impact report on five alternatives to address public transit in the Lynn area, including two that call for extending the Blue Line.

That draft is targeted for completion next spring, according to Erik Abell, a spokesman for the Executive Office of Transportation and Public Works.

State Senator Thomas M. McGee, a Lynn Democrat, called the inclusion of the project in the transportation bond bill "a big step forward" and a positive sign.

"Things are happening. I'm still very optimistic," he said. "We need locally and regionally to continue to make this our priority as we try and build a good transportation network for the 21st century. There's good recognition of that in our area of the North Shore and . . . I think people are recognizing that beyond the region."

In an e-mail, Abell said that once the draft environmental statement is issued, there will be further review of the various alternatives. While there is not a specific authorization amount for the Blue Line plan in the bond bill, he said, "We felt it was important to include the project within the overall authorization to continue the planning that is already underway for the extension."

To date, US Representative John F. Tierney, a Salem Democrat, has secured $5.25 million in federal money for the project, with another $2 million included in a new pending federal transportation bill. In a telephone interview Tuesday, Tierney said the proposed state funding would be helpful in securing future federal support for the project.

"It's a match project," he said of a project that requires state funds to access federal dollars. "In order for the federal people to look seriously at this thing, they want to know the state is looking seriously at it, which means they've targeted money toward their match. That's why it's important."

more stories like this"We've been talking to Governor Patrick since before he was governor" about the Blue Line project, Tierney added. "I think this shows he's coming through on the commitment he made to the community."

State lawmakers previously secured an authorization of $246.5 million in a 2004 state transportation bond bill to construct the Blue Line extension, with the condition that the state would receive a 50 percent match for whatever it spent. The state could only tap into that authorization, however, if the project moves into construction.

The options under review in the environmental impact report include extending the Blue Line to Lynn through the Point of Pines section of Revere, and extending it to Lynn along the existing commuter rail line.

A third alternative is to build a new commuter rail station near Wonderland and provide a way to transfer passengers between that stop and Wonderland station. The other two options are to expand service on the commuter rail and bus lines, and to do nothing.

Project boosters in Lynn say they will back whichever of the two Blue Line extension options proves most feasible.

"We think it's up to the transportation experts to determine which one makes the most sense," said Ted Grant, executive director of the Lynn Business Partnership, which has been a key supporter of the project.

But Mayor Thomas G. Ambrosino of Revere said his city "objects strenuously to going through Point of Pines and will do everything we can to oppose that alternative."

He said Revere would support extending the Blue Line along the existing commuter rail tracks as long as the city received a commuter rail stop at Wonderland.

Dennis DiZoglio, executive director of the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission, worked on the Blue Line project during his previous job as deputy general manager of planning and development at the MBTA.

"I think it's good news that the administration wants to use funds to advance the project further," he said, adding that the big test is whether they can come up with a project that is sufficiently cost-effective to be competitive in the bid for federal funds.

"It's been frustrating to wait so long," Clancy said of the years that have passed in pursuit of the Blue Line project. "I understand as well as anyone," he said, acknowledging that as a state senator, "it was something I did not accomplish."

"It's a hard sell for some reason in Boston," he said, adding, "Having said that, it would be gold for us."

Grant remains optimistic.

"Every step that has been taken the last several years has brought the project closer to fruition," he said. "This is a massive project and it's not going to happen overnight. The North Shore has made a sound argument and Governor Patrick clearly has listened . . . . The fact that the governor included the planning funding is extremely significant."
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 28th, 2007, 07:32 AM   #63
spongeg
Registered User
 
spongeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 8,039
Likes (Received): 1742

makes me think of this movie

spongeg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 26th, 2008, 08:14 PM   #64
geoking66
Registered User
 
geoking66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: London, New York
Posts: 3,279
Likes (Received): 7375

I don't get what's so hard about changing the overhead portion of the Blue Line to third rail.
geoking66 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 29th, 2008, 09:44 AM   #65
Encinal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 38
Likes (Received): 0

Does anyone know why the green line (at least in the subway) was never converted to high platforms, like San Francisco did, when they switched to the Boeing trains? That is the most unpleasant subway line I've ridden, especially when trying to climb the stairs and push into the crowd at the same time.

The T has this really strange mix of modern and decrepid. It's really good at hitting the more developed parts of the city and inner suburbs, even though the lines all seem a little short. On the other hand, the buses don't extend very far out into the suburbs.
Encinal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2008, 05:23 AM   #66
geoking66
Registered User
 
geoking66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: London, New York
Posts: 3,279
Likes (Received): 7375

Who knows? The Green line should have been converted to Red or Orange line standard heavy rail rather than light rail. It would speed up journeys and improve interconnectability. That would mean making the Green line only one route from Riverside-Lechmere with the B, C, and E branches becoming independent light rail lines.
geoking66 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2008, 11:49 AM   #67
GENIUS LOCI
No More Italian Mod
 
GENIUS LOCI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Milano
Posts: 35,327
Likes (Received): 11132

I find Boston Green Line really fantastic... it's the first metro built in USA and one of the first in the world (even if with today standard the system would be considered a metro-like, not a proper metro)

Underground stations are amazing some one with a high number of platforms, each for every destination; and convoys frequencies are incredibly high

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr












__________________
URBANFILE
GENIUS LOCI no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2008, 08:16 PM   #68
glickel
Da T
 
glickel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Boston
Posts: 19
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Encinal View Post
Does anyone know why the green line (at least in the subway) was never converted to high platforms, like San Francisco did, when they switched to the Boeing trains? That is the most unpleasant subway line I've ridden, especially when trying to climb the stairs and push into the crowd at the same time.

The T has this really strange mix of modern and decrepid. It's really good at hitting the more developed parts of the city and inner suburbs, even though the lines all seem a little short. On the other hand, the buses don't extend very far out into the suburbs.
They are in the process of converting all the rolling stock and rehabbing all the stations (including the above ground one) to make the handicap accessible. They got the new low floor trains about 7-10 years ago (I think from Breda, but I forget), but they kept derailing when they went over 25 miles an hour. The low-floor trains are running fine now, but they still have a good number of the old walk-up cars in service.

As a bostonian, I am not a big fan of the green line. Stops are very close together, and it can get backed up during rush hour. B-line is the worst, avoid at all costs unless you are in college, then that is a good place to party. C-line is good, and all train enthusiasts should check out the D-line. It is an old school railway converted to light rail.

For the record, I lived in SF, and I am not saying that the Green Line is a prize, but the Muni light rail, while clean, can be the ultimate nightmare and at the most random times.
__________________
World Champion Boston Red Sox
glickel no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2008, 11:20 PM   #69
mike7743
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: all over CahLifohnia, USA
Posts: 3,527
Likes (Received): 973

Boston has one of the world's ugliest Subway trains. as a Boston resident it is amazing and frustrating to me to see these old and ugly trains still being used. the train stations are laughable, although there is some work being done to some of the stations to upgrade them. overall for a world class city like the Boston the train system and the trains are third world class. and don't even get me started on the green line.

Last edited by mike7743; March 8th, 2008 at 01:48 PM.
mike7743 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 7th, 2008, 11:31 PM   #70
koolkid
Registered User
 
koolkid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 2,327
Likes (Received): 133

what about the green line?
__________________
My New York by Krzycho
koolkid no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2008, 07:28 PM   #71
BarbaricManchurian
来了就是深圳人
 
BarbaricManchurian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Worcester
Posts: 5,505
Likes (Received): 6896



It's a very slow light rail that has 4 different lines. Honestly, Boston's subway isn't that bad, it's old and barely has enough money to run itself, but its very effective for commuting across Boston, and it works great for such an old system with few modernizations (the whole underground green line section is getting modernized, and North Station has already been modernized, automatic fare collection with cards instead of tokens has started, above ground stations at Boston College and Fenway will get improved by construction, Boston's subway doesn't have much public funding, so it's nice to see the private sector pick up the slack).
BarbaricManchurian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 9th, 2008, 08:43 PM   #72
greg_christine
Registered User
 
greg_christine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Smithfield, VA
Posts: 1,008
Likes (Received): 142

I used to live in Boston and had a daily commute that featured both the Green Line and the Red Line. The Green Line isn't in the same league as the Red, Blue, and Orange Lines. The other lines offer a service that is faster and more reliable.
greg_christine no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 6th, 2010, 11:25 AM   #73
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17045

BOSTON | Public Transport

I didn't see a thread so i created one. Boston has one of US's largest Urban Public Transit System.

Number of lines

12 -- commuter rail (Future 18)
4 -- rapid transit (Future 3 extensions)
5 -- light rail (Future 5 spurs)
4 -- trolleybus
4 -- ferryboat
183 -- bus


Number of Stations

123 -- commuter rail (Future 130-170)
51 -- rapid transit (Future 63)
74 -- light rail (Future 106)
22 -- Bus Rapid Transit


Daily Ridership

1.3 million (weekday, all modes)


Began Operation

1897 -- light rail
1901 -- rapid transit
1964 -- MBTA

System length

1,193 mi (1,920 km) (total)
38 mi (61 km) -- rapid transit
26 mi (42 km) -- light rail
8 mi (13 km) -- BRT
751 mi (1,209 km) -- bus and trackless trolley
368 mi (592 km) -- commuter rail




Current system map



Current & Future Map

image hosted on flickr


Red line @ Central



Blue line @ Airport



Orange Line @ Massachusetts Ave



Green line @ Boylston



Mattapan-Ashmont MBTA Branch

__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 8th, 2010, 03:17 PM   #74
ovem
Commieblocks fan
 
ovem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 6,825
Likes (Received): 885

Nice thread. I think that Boston needs a circular MBTA line. Don't you think?
__________________
My tumblr
ovem no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 8th, 2010, 05:41 PM   #75
poshbakerloo
***Alexxx***
 
poshbakerloo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: London, Manchester, Cheshire, Sheffield, Moscow
Posts: 5,094
Likes (Received): 292

how has this thread not been made yet! lol its like missing out London or summit
__________________
"BEFORE WE MARRY...I HAVE A SECRET!"

I <3 London
poshbakerloo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 8th, 2010, 06:34 PM   #76
JustinB
Registered User
 
JustinB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,633
Likes (Received): 30

Good thread! You should add pictures of the Silver Line. It is unique amongst Bus Rapid Transit since it actually has grade seperated portions underground, and utilizes dual mode buses.
__________________
The more valuable you perceive your time as worth, the less valuable it actually is.
JustinB no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2010, 07:44 AM   #77
Nexis
Dark Wolf
 
Nexis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Along the Rails of North Jersey..
Posts: 15,688
Likes (Received): 17045

Quote:
Originally Posted by ovem View Post
Nice thread. I think that Boston needs a circular MBTA line. Don't you think?
There planning one , so is DC and Philly. The Boston one is planned to be a bus , but many commuters and politicians want that to be changed to Heavy Rail. Since the line would have higher Ridership then the entire Regional Rail system.
__________________
My FLICKR Page < 54,100+ Photos of Urban Renewal , Infrastructure , Food and Nature in the Northeastern US
Visit the Reorganized New York City Section
My Photography Website
Visit the New Jersey Section
Nexis no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2010, 03:27 PM   #78
ovem
Commieblocks fan
 
ovem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 6,825
Likes (Received): 885

Well, a bus line wouldn't be bad either, but I would prefer a heavy rail line totally underground
__________________
My tumblr
ovem no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2010, 08:43 PM   #79
FabriFlorence
Registered User
 
FabriFlorence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Firenze
Posts: 1,773
Likes (Received): 401

Very good network, may be the best in USA.
FabriFlorence no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2010, 03:16 AM   #80
manrush
Agenda 21 Advocate
 
manrush's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Urban New England
Posts: 4,150
Likes (Received): 499

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
There planning one , so is DC and Philly. The Boston one is planned to be a bus , but many commuters and politicians want that to be changed to Heavy Rail. Since the line would have higher Ridership then the entire Regional Rail system.
I'm guessing you're referring to the urban ring line in Boston.

Finally, it's good to see a thread made for the T and Commuter rail.

One of the drawbacks of the T is the fact that rolling stock for each metro line can only be used on that line.
manrush no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
boston, massdot, the t

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium