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Old August 13th, 2010, 03:03 PM   #81
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Boeing envisions hybrid planes in 2030

Imagine flying across the U.S. in an aircraft that is partly powered by electricity, weighs lighter, flies quieter and releases less green house gas emissions than any commercial airplanes ever made. Well, that could soon come true in 2030.

Boeing Co., the Chicago-based aerospace giant, is working on a concept plane called the SUGAR Volt as part of NASA's N+3 program, which aims to explore what aircraft three generations beyond current ones may look like. SUGAR stands for Subsonic Ultra-Green Aircraft Research.

The SUGAR Volt, similar in appearance as a 737, is a twin- engine aircraft with hybrid propulsion technology that has the potential to change the aviation industry by reducing green house gas emissions and lowering fuel usage. The concept plane reduces fuel burn by more than 70 percent and total energy use by 55 percent when battery energy included. It can also cruise on battery or biofuel power when flying.

Like a 7373, the SUGAR Volt can carry 154 passengers and fly a maximum of 3500 miles. But the aircraft's designers say they would prefer the aircraft fly an average of 900 miles per trip.

"If you are going the long range, you are using mostly jet fuel to do it. But when you are flying a shorter range, you are using mostly battery," said Dr. Marty Bradley, Boeing Research and Technology principal investigator, SUGAR, with an exclusive interview with Xinhua. "I think whenever you can, you are going to fly as much on electric power as you can."

The SUGAR Volt could weigh 5,000 lbs less at take off compared with current planes that weigh 185,000 lbs. Today's conventional aircraft such as a 737 flies at 78 percent the speed of sound. The SUGAR Volt flies at about 77 percent speed. While the hybrid plane may fly slightly slower than current aircraft, Bradley says improving air traffic control system could erase the difference.

"With the Next Gen Air Traffic Control System, which allows airplanes to fly more direct routes, you can do continuous climb and descend," said Bradley. "By improving air traffic control system can more than make up for that small reduction in cruising speed."

What's more, depending on fuel prices, airline companies may just want to fly slower.

"If price of fuel continues to go up, then there's an incentive to slow down to save fuel, there's a cost effect in there, so you might choose to go slower to save money on a flight," he added.

As part of NASA's N+3 project, the Boeing team was challenged with conceptualizing a plane that would have a 71-decible reduction below current Federal Aviation Administration noise standards.

"We didn't achieve the NASA noise [reduction] goals so we need to continue working on that with the engine companies and with the configuration in order to meet that," Bradley said.

The Boeing team is looking at placing sound absorbing materials in the engine or using active noise suppression, such as blowing jets to cancel out the noise, to reduce the SUGAR Volt's noise level.

"Everything we are looking at [achieving] will be a lot quieter than the current airplanes we have today," he said.

There is one element, however, that is holding the concept plane back from becoming reality -- battery power.

The team worked the battery-power problem in reverse, asking how good do batteries have to be to make a hybrid plane that is competitive with a airplane that is completely powered by fuel.

"We determined that we needed 750 watt-hour per kilogram to make this system competitive with a jet fuel powered only airplane, " Bradley said. "That's about four times the most advanced battery we have today, or it could be about 15 times the performance you get out of some of the electric cars now."

Bradley said it's a very advance battery goal that his team is setting for the battery industry. University and industry researchers are all working to find solutions. Some battery technology include lithium-ion, lithium-air, which has the potential of increasing the energy density by as much as five to ten times compared to lithium ion batteries, and super capacitor, which could charge in seconds.

There are two approaches that the Boeing team is looking at: battery technology that can charge quickly and modular batteries that can be charged overnight.

"The advantage of [modular batteries] is that electric utilities charge lower rates for charging overnight and they have greater capacity in the electrical grid. [The utilities companies] may also want us to charge overnight rather than quickly charge in the day when they have peak demand," he explained.

Since aircraft typically have to be in and out of gates in under an hour, Bradley said modular batteries, which can be quickly replaced with charged up batteries, are more likely to happen first.

The SUGAR Volt, though conceptualized as a hybrid system, is not like the Prius or Chevvy Volt, "our concept does not charge while in flight," said Bradley.

Charging battery in flight could be something the Boeing team will look at if it receives a contract from NASA to design planes that are four generations ahead of current aircraft.

Titled N+4, the team hopes to perform more design and analysis of hybrid gas electric turbine propulsion architectures, the aerodynamics of strut/truss-braced wings, noise reduction technologies and the benefits of methane or hydrogen fuel.

The team has already submitted its proposal to NASA and will find out at the end of the year if they receive a research contract. When asked about the team's potential to receive the contract, Bradley laughed and replied, "I think we have a very good chance." (PNA/Xinhua).

http://www.tradingmarkets.com/news/s...0-1108382.html
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Old August 16th, 2010, 01:08 PM   #82
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Mesa hopes Boeing's Marine One contract takes off

Mesa is among the Boeing Co. locations in the running to manufacture the Marine One presidential helicopters.

Before the aerospace giant can win the multibillion-dollar contract to build a fleet of up to 28 helicopters, it must overcome political concerns over the cost of the project and repair a rocky relationship with Arizona's senior senator, John McCain.

It also must bring Mesa's congressional representative, Jeff Flake, a notorious budget hawk, into the fold.

Former President George W. Bush was set to replace the aging helicopter fleet, but last year President Barack Obama scrapped the project after costs to upgrade the aircrafts' ability to withstand an attack sent the price skyrocketing to more than $13 billion from $6.1 billion.

Obama took aim at the soaring costs and said the current fleet of helicopters built by Sikorsky - some of them 35 years ago - was adequate.

However, the Navy in February announced it had resumed seeking a replacement of the Marine One fleet amid expectations that competition between aerospace behemoths such as Boeing and Sikorsky will drive down costs.

Boeing is prepared to submit three helicopter platforms - the Chinook, V-22 Osprey and AW101 - when the Navy asks for proposals next year, Boeing Rotorcraft Systems Vice President Phil Dunford said during a recent visit to the company's Mesa operations.

The company builds the Chinook and Osprey in Philadelphia and is purchasing the rights to build the midsize AW101 from AgustaWestland, a British-Italian firm, he said.

The licensing agreement could give Boeing a leg up in the competition because the European company had teamed with Lockheed Martin, a U.S. aerospace corporation, to win the presidential-helicopter contract in 2005 with a version of the AgustaWestland model that Boeing would build

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Old August 16th, 2010, 01:20 PM   #83
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Boeing Plans Commercial Space Taxis by 2015

The Boeing Co. plans to be ready to fly commercial space taxis from Cape Canaveral to the International Space Station by 2015 and soon will decide where the spacecraft will be manufactured and assembled.

Designed to launch on United Launch Alliance Atlas or Delta rockets, or perhaps even SpaceX Falcon 9s, the spacecraft also are destined to fly to a commercial space station being developed by Bigelow Aerospace in Nevada.

Four test flights — including three from Florida's Space Coast— are targeted to launch in late 2013 and 2014.

Florida is competing with Alabama, Texas and Nevada for various parts of the spacecraft work. The number of jobs is still to be determined. Decisions on where work will be done are expected within three months.

"We're going through the process of deciding not only where we will do the manufacturing, but where we will do the mission operations, the training, the sustaining engineering, the program management — all aspects of the program," said John Elbon, Boeing's vice president for commercial space programs.

http://abcnews.go.com/Travel/boeing-...ry?id=11343719
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Old August 16th, 2010, 02:26 PM   #84
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KB keep up the good work, great articles
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Old August 28th, 2010, 06:29 PM   #85
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Boeing removes exec in charge of delayed 747-8 freighter

One day after announcing yet another delay for its 787 Dreamliner, Boeing has removed Mohammad "Mo" Yahyavi as head of its troubled 747-8 program in Everett.

Aviation industry experts have blamed management for delays in both programs.

Yahyavi was put on an unspecified special assignment, and airplane programs vice president Pat Shanahan assumes greater oversight of the 747 program, he told workers in an e-mail sent Friday afternoon.

The 747-8 is a stretch version of Boeing's iconic humped jumbo jet. First will come a freighter version, then one for passengers seating 467 people which will go up against Airbus' 525-seat A380.

Like the 787, the new freighter suffers from chronic delays.

Although delivery is still scheduled for this year, Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Jim Albaugh said in July that like the Dreamliner, its delivery may slip into next year.

Shanahan said at the time that problems with its design require "enhancements to the flight controls" and "some new flight tests we hadn't originally planned." He declined to say what specific problem had been identified.

Last fall, Boeing unexpectedly announced that first flight for the 747-8, which was scheduled for last November, would happen early this year instead — a year beyond its original schedule. The delay put delivery in the fourth quarter of this year.

Just six weeks before that delay was announced, Yahyavi said he expected three flight-test airplanes would be in the air by the end of 2009. He said he'd given the same forecast to the full Boeing board that same week.

First flight ended up happening in February, and four planes are currently in flight testing.

The 747-8 program was already in trouble with Yahyavi took charge in February 2009. It had recently announced an expensive, nine-month delay.

Yahyavi came from Renton, where he led the successful Poseidon program, an anti-submarine airplane for the Navy.

When Shanahan moved from Boeing's defense business in 2007, he was supposed to fix the 787 program. He was later put in charge of all airplane programs.

Other promotions follow Yahyavi's shift out of the lead 747-8 role.

Elizabeth Lund, vice president and general manager in the 767 program, becomes deputy program manager for the 747, reporting to Shanahan.

Lund will be replaced by Kim Pastega, who had been director of 777 manufacturing. She also will report to Shanahan.

Pastega will be replaced by Jason Clark, leader of the 747-8 interiors team. Reporting to Larry Loftis, Clark will oversee assembly of the 777 family, including leading it through its rate increase that's planned for next year.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...ingexec28.html
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Old September 9th, 2010, 03:39 PM   #86
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Boeing to open headquarters in Qatar


The number of Boeing aircraft in Qatar has increased substantially in recent months and the trend is expected to continue

Manama: Boeing will soon have a base in Qatar, according to Paul Kinscherff, the company's president for the Middle East.

"Currently, Boeing is operating from Dubai, but given the circumstances, opening a full-fledged office in Qatar has become a necessity. And it’s going to become a reality soon," he was quoted by Qatar Tribune, as saying.

He added that the number of Boeing aircraft in Qatar has increased substantially in recent months and the trend is expected to continue with the company poised for massive growth.

This year the airline procured eight Boeing 777s. It has also placed orders for Boeing's Dreamliner 787 and bought a couple of the massive tactical airlifter C-17 Globemaster III produced by Boeing

Kinscherff emphasised too the need for field infrastructure. "Given the massive investment made by Qatar Airways in planes, there’s an urgent need for field infrastructure for the upkeep of aircraft," said Kinscherff.

"You cannot keep your aircraft stranded for a long time. That is basic economics. It has to remain airworthy to make profits and that needs manpower and spare parts for its upkeep," he told the daily in Doha.

In comments on whether Boeing was interested in selling fighter aircraft like F-16s and F-18s to Qatar, Kinscherff said it was a matter for the two governments to decide.

"This is an altogether different ball game. For military planes, the decision has to be taken by the American Senate. There is continued interest in tactical aircraft, rotorcraft and strategic airlift in the region," he said.

He added that the company was aware of the interest shown by Qatar Airways in the Canadian Bombardier C-Series aircraft, which, according to Akbar Al Baker, the airlines Chief Executive Officer, are to be used on flights to destinations within three hour's flight of its Doha hub.

"We build large business class jets like the Jumbos or the 737s to cater to the elite class in which they can accommodate their entire troupe. But with the market hotting up for smaller jets, having a capacity of around 110 seats, Boeing is having a wait-and-watch approach," he said.

Shrugging off the effects of the economic recession, he said the outlook for the aviation sector was upbeat in 2010, adding that, "so far the airline industry has bagged an order of 263 planes of various types, which is roughly equivalent to that of 2009”.

The Middle East, China and India have helped the aviation sector beat the recession, he added, pointing out that the Middle East market over the next 20 years is expected to be worth $390 billion (DH1, 432.55 billion) and the world in general, will need about 30,900 new aircraft by 2029.

http://gulfnews.com/business/aviatio...qatar-1.679734
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Old September 10th, 2010, 04:42 AM   #87
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Boeing Sugar Volt looks to the skies in the year 2035

By Noel McKeegan
11:42 August 2, 2010


Boeing SUGAR Volt concept design (Image: NASA/The Boeing Company)

Although the theme of AirVenture 2010 was "Salute to Veterans," the future of air travel was also brought to the fore – and that means electric airplanes. The focus on e-aviation culminated in the World Symposium of Electric Aircraft last Friday and among the many interesting designs discussed was Boeing's Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) Volt concept. Borne out of the same NASA research program that gave birth to MIT's D “double bubble” concept, the SUGAR Volt is a twin-engine aircraft design notable for its trussed, elongated wings and electric battery gas turbine hybrid propulsion system – a system designed to reduce fuel burn by more than 70 percent and total energy use by 55 percent. Could this be the future shape of commercial air transportation?

The SUGAR Volt (a choice of name that Chevrolet might have something to say about) is envisioned as running on either fuel or electricity and could include hinges in the wing design so that they could be folded when on the ground. It is designed to fly at Mach 0.79, carry 154 passengers over a range of 3,500 nautical miles and achieve shorter takeoff distance.

A second Boeing-led design known as Icon II was also put forward in the NASA research program. This concept uses a split tail design to achieve supersonic flight over land with reduced fuel burn and noise. Icon II could carry The Icon II concept can carry 120 passengers, cruise at Mach 1.6 to Mach 1.8 and achieve a range of about 5,000 nautical miles.



The goals of the NASA supersonic research program included a 71-decibel reduction below current Federal Aviation Administration noise standards, a greater than 75 percent reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions, a greater than 70 percent reduction in fuel burn performance and reduced air traffic congestion and delays at airports.

The program was targeted at designs that could be feasible in the 2030-2035 time frame. It concluded in April and further research announcements are expected.

http://www.gizmag.com/boeing-sugar-v...ircraft/15915/
Mehh, not feeling the design.
and the Icon II concept only holding 120 people? Hmm, I bet it would be a hitch with mid-sized carriers who fly regionally, but for global carriers I don't know. 120 carrying capacity is really small.
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Old September 15th, 2010, 01:29 PM   #88
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World Trade Organisation to rule Boeing $24bn subsidies illegal

The World Trade Organisation is expected to rule on Wednesday that huge subsidies paid to Boeing since the early 1990s are illegal, equalising the score in the epic legal fight between the US planemaker and Europe’s Airbus.


The ruling is largely symbolic as the WTO cannot issue legally binding decisions

The EU complaint alleges that Boeing received $24bn (£15.5bn) in illicit aid, including $16bn in grants from the NASA space agency, as well as $2.1bn of export tax discounts through Foreign Sales Corporations (FSC), and subsidies from the Pentagon.

Experts say the WTO has already ruled seven times that Washington’s use of FSC is an illegal form of subsidy, and is certain to do this time in its 1,500-page report.

The panel is also likely to condemn up to $5.7bn in aid for the new 787 Dreamliner, arguably the most subsidised passenger jet in history.

The ruling is largely symbolic. The WTO cannot issue legally binding decisions. While there is a sanctions provision, governments are loathe to use it.

Yet it will almost certainly be moral relief for Airbus after suffering its own rebuff in June. Then the WTO said the EU had breached trade law by providing development loans to Airbus for the A380 superjumbo and other aircraft at below market rates - though it found that Europe’s use of government loans was allowable mechanism.

Lord Mandelson, a former EU trade commissioner, said the EU had entered the fray in 2005 in the face of “legal trench warfare” by Boeing.

Brussels suspected that Boeing was trying to use the WTO machinery to halt Airbus’s advance in the US market.

He said the dispute had become sterile, benefiting lawyers. Rather than continuing this pointless feud, the US and Europe need to find a way to sit down and negotiate,” he said.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/n...s-illegal.html

It should be noted that earlier WTO also ruled against Airbus receiving subsidies.
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Old October 1st, 2010, 01:03 PM   #89
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Boeing Wins $11.9 Billion Contract For B-52 Program

Thursday, September 30, 2010

Wichita employees are assured of continuing modernization work on the Boeing B-52 because of a new Pentagon contract worth nearly $12 billion dollars.

"The new contract from the Pentagon assured that Boeing Wichita will help keep the B-52 flying for years to come. There's a long rich heritage of Boeing and B-52 in Wichita," Boeing Wichita Director of B-52 Programs Scot Oathout said.

That heritage goes back more than 50 years when B-52 final assembly was done in Wichita. It was the last final assembly line at Boeing's Wichita plant. For 55 years since then, Boeing Wichita employees have kept the venerable jet modernized so the war fighter doesn't fall behind in battle technology.

And the Pentagon will be leaning on that experience for at least the eight-year duration of a contract which altogether could be worth $11.9 billion dollars.

Oathout calls it an "umbrella contract" because within the agreement will come the specific work contracts for such things as engineering work, studies, production and any other activities to sustain the B-52. The first delivery order is for new evolutionary data link kits to be installed on B-52s stationed on the Island of Guam.

"I think it's an excellent contract. I hope they get the work here to Wichita., Oathout adds.

Boeing Wichita employs about 2,300 now. Of that number about 400 are tied to B-52 programs. And, although the contract doesn't signal an expansion here with more jobs to come, it does assure that the work that is being done here now will be supported and those employees will have work to do for years to come.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 08:13 PM   #90
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Flying the 747-8 Intercontinental's first "flight"

The new 747-8 Intercontinental's cast and crew conducted their first systematic walk-through rehearsal on January 8th. With the airplane stationary inside its Everett, Wash. factory, the troupe of test pilots and engineers worked onboard for hours, conducting extensive flight simulation exercises called "factory gauntlet testing."

The testing, designed to affirm readiness, is a major milestone for the passenger version of the 747-8; it's the first time all onboard systems are tested together. Passing the gauntlet paves the way for the airplane to rollout of the factory and make its first real flight.


Source: Boeing
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Old March 16th, 2011, 01:13 PM   #91
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Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental may fly Sunday

NEW YORK — US aerospace giant Boeing said Tuesday that its newest jumbo jet may make its first flight Sunday.

"The 747-8 Intercontinental first flight window will open Sunday, March 20, 10:00 am (1700 GMT) at Paine Field in Everett, Washington," the company said.

The date was dependent upon successful completion of taxi testing and suitable weather conditions, Boeing said.

The 747-8 completed final gauntlet testing -- simulation of flight conditions to test systems and ensure flight readiness -- on Sunday.

The plane is a longer and more fuel-efficient update of Boeing's double-decker 747 jumbo jet, and will compete with European rival Airbus's A380, the world's biggest passenger plane.

Boeing's largest passenger plane, the 747-8 can carry 467 passengers in a three-class configuration and is designed for long-haul routes.

The double-deck A380, made by the France-based Airbus unit of EADS, entered service in 2007 and can carry 525 passengers in the same configuration.

Using 787 Dreamliner engine technology, Boeing says its new aircraft will achieve better fuel economy than any competing jetliner. Compared with the A380, it said, the new plane's per seat-mile costs are more than six percent lower.

Lufthansa, which has ordered 20, is expected to be the first customer to receive the new model, likely in early 2012, Boeing said last month. When the order was announced in 2006, the German airline expected first delivery in 2010.

To date, the 747-8 program has garnered 107 orders: 33 for the passenger planes and 74 for the cargo version.

Luxembourg's Cargolux is scheduled to take delivery of the first 747-8 freighter in the middle of this year, nearly two years later than the original target delivery date.

Copyright © 2011 AFP. All rights reserved
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Old March 16th, 2011, 01:37 PM   #92
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Potential customers debate Boeing and Airbus narrow-body strategies

PHOENIX — In the narrow-body war that has broken out in the airplane business, large U.S. carriers Delta and United are potential targets for Airbus as it pitches a plane to displace those airlines' aging and now discontinued Boeing 757 jets.

Airbus is offering a spanking new fuel-efficient engine on its 220-seat A321 by 2016. Boeing won't have a direct competitor until the end of the decade.

"Delta and United should be in the gleaming eyes of Airbus," said Doug Runte, managing director of Piper Jaffray as he moderated an industry panel discussing the A321 Monday at the annual conference of the International Society of Transport Aircraft Trading (ISTAT) in Phoenix.

The top buyers and financiers of airliners at the conference focused on the competing and divergent strategies of Boeing and Airbus.

Boeing is looking to launch a new airplane, the 797, that would replace the upper end of the 737 family as well as the 757.

Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Jim Albaugh said the company wants to avoid the disastrous delays that happened on the 787 Dreamliner program by not adding too much new technology on the 797.

"We need to limit the risk and make sure that what we are biting off is not as much as we bit off on the 787," Albaugh said. "I don't want this airplane to be the son of 787."

Still, if it goes ahead, the 797 won't arrive until the end of the decade.

Bombardier executive Gary Scott made a vigorous case that his new CSeries jet will dominate the low end of the narrow-body category, from 100 to 150 seats.

Albaugh virtually conceded Boeing won't even bother with that market segment. Airbus doesn't plan to put a new engine on its smallest airplane until 2017, perhaps in practice conceding the same.

But at the high end of the small-jet market, the big guys are going head to head with very different approaches.

Sigthor Einarsson, until a few weeks ago the deputy chief executive of Icelandair, said his airline — an all-757 operator looking to renew its fleet — was delighted by Airbus' move to re-engine the A321, providing an option that didn't exist before.

Einarsson, who still consults for Icelandair, said the A321neo (for "new engine option") will be able to fly virtually all Icelandair's current routes. "Icelandair was delighted to have an option that comes close to the 757," he said in an interview.

Einarsson said Airbus has trapped Boeing into the position of offering an all-new plane because a new engine won't fit under the low wing of the 737 without a significant redesign.

But now that Boeing is talking up the prospects of a new plane, he said, Icelandair "is looking carefully at what Boeing is doing on the 797."

He said the airline can wait until 2020 or even beyond if it has to, and won't decide until it gets more detail from Boeing.

Earlier Monday, Adam Pilarski, a leading aviation analyst with consulting firm Avitas, predicted Boeing would be forced to put a new engine on the 737 this year.

Pilarski said that before 2020 there is no revolutionary technology available besides the new engines Airbus will use to justify spending the vast sums required to launch a new plane.

"Maybe doing something quickly is a better idea," said Pilarski. "Waiting a decade, you help the Chinese and Russians establish a beachhead."

But Albaugh, in his presentation later in the day, reiterated that he sees no business case for putting a new engine on the 737. He bet Pilarski a bottle of wine that the latter's prediction would prove wrong.

Albaugh said the current 737 will be built in Renton for at least 15 or 20 years, even after any new jet enters service.

He said he wants to use Boeing's engineering talent to build a new plane.

"We've just trained 18,000 engineers how to do development programs," said Albaugh, referring to the new 787 and 747-8 jet projects. "It's our intent to roll those people into new programs."

He also committed Boeing to developing a new, larger version of the Dreamliner, the 787-10.

Albaugh conceded at the conference that the initial 787-8 version of the Dreamliner will not meet its original performance specification, although he said it will be able to fly the routes the airlines need with the payloads they require.

Over time, Albaugh said, the plane will be improved and will eventually meet its promised performance.

"When that date is going to be, I can't tell you," he said.

Norman Liu, chief executive of the world's largest airplane-leasing company, GECAS, said in an interview it will be years before it's clear whether Boeing or Airbus had the better narrow-body strategy.

"By 2025, there'll be thousands and thousands and thousands of the current versions of both the A320 and the 737, and the A320neo and whatever the new Boeing plane is," said Liu.

"Maybe in 2030, you can take stock of who was right or wrong."

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...rplanes15.html
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Old March 16th, 2011, 07:12 PM   #93
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Air India Compensation Claims For Boeing 787 Delays Unrealistic

Summary

Boeing’s flagship 787 is delayed – we all know it. Air India’s claim for compensation, while just, has another element here – the airline, like most other Indian carriers, is a poorly run entity. Blame Boeing all you like, the real fault lies at Air India’s door.

Analysis

There isn’t a 787 customer who couldn’t have made (or saved) millions had the airplane arrived into their fleets on time. As it is, the 787 is and has been delayed and there’s no changing that fact. Since the Air India merger with Indian Airlines in 2007, the newly formed National Aviation Company of India Limited (NACIL) has struggled to either coalesce the two firms together and has been slow to change its business in the wake of falling business and high yield traffic.

After placing the biggest order in the history of Indian aviation in late 2005, Air India has inducted a number of 777-200LR and 777-300ERs and has been negotiating with Boeing to cancel the last three 777-300ERs it has on order.

Air India claims the 787s could have saved them money yet they have not deployed the 777-200LRs or 777-300ERs, arguably the most efficient widebody jets in service today, effectively enough to reap the rewards of their multi-billion dollar investments. There is nothing to suggest the 787s would have been any better when yield attrition would have eroded all the fuel burn savings the airplane has.

India has been struggling to cope with massive overcapacity on its domestic network and its airlines are simply too laden with red tape, political interference and apathy to move towards efficient operations and compete against foreign airlines coming into the country. If Air India gets anywhere near the reported $840m in damages they seek, it serves only to highlight how badly run the airline is – granted, not as bad as Kingfisher Airlines who can’t even afford to fuel their jets, but still bad nonetheless.

And to think, Air India still has another three 777-300ERs to be delivered – there are airlines like Emirates who can’t get enough of these fuel efficient airplanes and here we have Air India wanting to cancel orders yet with the same tongue complain about how badly it has been affected by the absence of the 787.

The irony of this will not be lost on Boeing.

Many airlines are entitled to claim for the delays on the 787, but to accuse Boeing of being somehow responsible (directly or indirectly) for any business woes just goes to show the lengths many will go so that they can avoid being blamed for their own inadequacies.

Boeing has admitted time and again it has gotten things wrong on the 787.

Its high time Air India realised it has no one else to blame but itself for its poor performance.

http://www.glgroup.com/News/Air-Indi...tic-49991.html
what blasphemy. this article again reeks of that deep rooted 3rd world antagonism which makes anyone and everyone believe that nothing can be managed properly in India.

Regarding Air India, yes it is a poorly run entity. but whats with the poorly managed/run other carriers? Jet Airways and Kingfisher Airlines despite running into losses haven't cut corners in passenger services. I have personally found these two to be one of the finest. Even comparable to the services provided by Singapore air and Emirates.

And regarding the over capacity on the domestic sectors. you must be kidding me. who so ever is the author of this article has either a prejudiced opinion or hasn't done his/her research properly.
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Old March 17th, 2011, 08:26 AM   #94
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Originally Posted by sidney_jec View Post

And regarding the over capacity on the domestic sectors. you must be kidding me. who so ever is the author of this article has either a prejudiced opinion or hasn't done his/her research properly.
I guess he/she was trying to make is that the airlines themselves are responsible for running in a loss, and not about quality of service or any other thing. (even though I do agree with you the language used was rather harsh).

Just out of interest, did Air India manage to get any compensation and how much?
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Old March 17th, 2011, 09:44 PM   #95
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No idea. I guess the talks are still on
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Old April 26th, 2011, 11:53 PM   #96
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Boeing moots radical revamp of 737 (Financial Times)

Boeing is looking at a radical revamp of its venerable 737 aircraft, the world’s most widely flown commercial jet, including a plan for an all-new aircraft with a main body made of the plastic composites used in its ground-breaking 787 Dreamliner.

Another option the US aircraft maker has been quietly outlining in presentations to its leading airline customers would see the single-aisle 737 that it first started making in the 1960s replaced with a twin-aisle aircraft.

The company is referring to this option, which would transform the way millions of people fly, as the “new light twin”, say executives briefed on Boeing’s plans. Jeff Smisek, chief executive of the newly merged United Continental group in the US, told the FT the idea was for a “highly fuel efficient” new jet seating at least 200 passengers.

The move comes as Boeing and its European rival, Airbus, face pressure from rival manufacturers to find cheaper, more fuel-efficient replacements for their best-selling jets – the 737 and Airbus’s younger A320 family of aircraft – which together make up almost half of all commercial jets in operation.

Airbus took the plunge in December, announcing it would put new engines on its A320 aircraft to shave fuel consumption by 15 per cent.

It has since won more than 300 commitments for these A320 NEO [new engine option] aircraft as fuel prices have soared amid Middle East unrest.

Boeing is still weighing its options, including a jet with a fuselage made of the plastic composites used in its much-delayed 787 Dreamliner but wings made of traditional aluminium.

Some industry sources say this is an acknowledgement of the lessons learnt from the production glitches Boeing faced with the 787, whose fuselage and wings are both made of composites.

Beverly Wyse, general manager of the 737 programme at Boeing’s commercial aircraft division, told the FT the company was still some way away from a final decision on what she called “the new small airplane”.

“If you did a twin-aisle, you can get turn-time benefits because you can load and offload passengers much more quickly,” she said.

But widening the diameter of the jet’s main body meant “you’re going to give up something in terms of fuel efficiency, so it’s really about figuring out where those trades are”.

Plastic composites technology, she said, while “very powerful on the larger airplanes does not scale down as well” to smaller jets.

Howard Millar, finance director at Ryanair, one of the 737’s largest customers, said he had reservations about the twin-aisle idea, which could also boost seating capacity from current levels of less than 200 passengers.

“Turnround times would be helped by a twin aisle,” he said. “However, building a twin-aisle with a capability of up to 250 seats means the aircraft will have to be pretty heavy, which affects fuel costs and airport charges driven by weight.”

United’s Mr Smisek said his airline had told Boeing it wanted to see another “game-changing” aircraft such as the lightweight 787. “In the world of $130-a-barrel jet fuel, it’s a no-brainer, ” he said in an interview.

Ms Wyse played down speculation Boeing would reveal its final plans for the 737 at the Paris air show in June, a traditional venue for big industry announcements.

“But we’ll definitely give the market a strong indication of which way we’re going,” she said.
If Ryanair doesn't want it, I very much doubt a new two-aisle plane will be chosen as a substitute for the 737, although it would have been interesting to see such a radical change in the aviation industry
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Old April 27th, 2011, 07:26 PM   #97
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It is interesting, with reports that the airframe cant be easily re-engined they have had to think of more radical alternatives to compete with the NEO. Essentially an XWB twin isle would be heavier but spend less time on the ground or a plastic fuselage which would be lighter and make fuel savings that way. The fact their not contemplating putting the same dreamliner technology into the wings as they are the fuselage (and with Dreamliners having to be modified to strengthen the wing/fuselage join) suggests the wings came out heavier or more complicated to engineer than the fuselage itself.
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Old August 30th, 2011, 04:27 PM   #98
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Boeing hasn't gone for a brand new narrow body, but has opted for a re-engine version of the 737.
Quote:
Boeing Launches 737 New Engine Family with Commitments for 496 Airplanes from Five Airlines

SEATTLE, Aug. 30, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Boeing (NYSE: BA) Company's board of directors has approved the launch of the new engine variant of the market-leading 737, based on order commitments for 496 airplanes from five airlines and a strong business case.

The new 737 family will be powered by CFM International LEAP-1B engines optimized for the 737. It will have the lowest operating costs in the single-aisle segment with a 7 percent advantage over the competition. Deliveries are scheduled to begin in 2017.

Full article:
http://boeing.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=1907
Only 1 of the 5 airlines with commitments for the new version is known, with American Airlines having an option for 100 planes.
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Old August 30th, 2011, 04:57 PM   #99
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So today's 737 wasn't better than the NEO after all then?

I feel that is is the best approach at this time. A new plane is not viable at present for a number of reasons.

Looking forward to seeing this in the air.
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Old August 30th, 2011, 05:26 PM   #100
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Yes indeed, they should focus first to get the 787-9 in production. Then they can start to think about a complete new plane, but that could also be a successor for the 777 based on the 787.

With the new 737 Boeing has to watch out that they won't be making this another 747-8, that also began as a re-engine project of the 747-400. But with the 500 commitments they will make sure to keep that under control. They must already be happy with this number, even though it's not as big as the 1000+ orders that Airbus has for the NEO. But as a start they must be glad that it isn't just a few small left over orders from airlines that didn't want to wait until Airbus delivered all the big NEO orders.
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