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Old August 11th, 2010, 06:17 AM   #1
ArchitectCS
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Lisieux

Before the war, Lisieux had some truly remarkable Medieval buildings. Many on these were in the Rue aux Fèves, which was almost untouched since the Middle Ages. To the best of my knowledge, none of it was rebuilt after the war. I'm including a few pictures that I got from 'Lost Treasures of Europe' by Henry LaFarge, published in 1946. It is a book of nothing but prewar photos of buildings destroyed in WWII. Though it only has about 400 pictures in it, they are almost all full page and give a great overview of what was lost. I highly recommend it for people who are interested in prewar architecture.

Rue aux Fèves



This is the House of the Salamanders. I don't know if it was in the Rue aux Fèves or not, but to me it is the epitome of a Medieval house. I do not believe it was rebuilt.





If anyone has any more pictures or information about the Rue aux Fèves or the House of the Salamanders, please post it here. Thanks.
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Old August 11th, 2010, 07:55 PM   #2
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I found that book on the shelves of my university library many years ago, and many was the hour that I spent looking at it instead of doing my university work
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Old August 11th, 2010, 11:19 PM   #3
ArchitectCS
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I stumbled on it when I was in high school and must have checked it out of the library a hundred times. Fortunately you can usually get a copy for a reasonable price if you don't have one.
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Old August 12th, 2010, 01:29 AM   #4
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Here are a few more of Lisieux before the war:











http://relaxmax.canalblog.com/albums...rre/index.html
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Old August 12th, 2010, 04:39 PM   #5
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Not many pictures, but it's good enough
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Old August 12th, 2010, 10:51 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cc80cc80 View Post
Not many pictures, but it's good enough
Find some more then...
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Old August 17th, 2010, 10:17 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArchitectCS View Post
/.../
This is the House of the Salamanders. I don't know if it was in the Rue aux Fèves or not, but to me it is the epitome of a Medieval house. I do not believe it was rebuilt.
/.../
Lisieux... I've always avoided going there, even though there still is an interesting cathedral, because I would feel so depressed. The house of the Salamander was indeed located in the rue aux Fèves. It was not rebuilt (no old house was, afaik).
You can read sometimes that the house of the Salamander would have survived the war : having being dismantled in the 1910’s, it would have been rebuilt in Etretat, and would now be a hotel :
http://www.etretathotel.com/GB_etret...el_history.htm
But there is some controversy on this, and as you can see on the picture, the house in Etretat doesn’t look at all like the original house of the Salamander. Besides, I own a pre-war guide book, which mentions the house of the Salamander in Lisieux, not in Etretat.
I found on the web a more likeable version: the house in Etretat would be rebuilt from an anotherdismantled Lisieux house, but would have been adorned with copies or imitations of the sculptures of the house of the Salamander.
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Old August 17th, 2010, 10:23 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArchitectCS View Post
/.../
If anyone has any more pictures or information about the Rue aux Fèves or the House of the Salamanders, please post it here. Thanks.
Pictures of Lisieux :

About 700 hundred (low res) pictures of Lisieux, mostly prewar :
http://www.culture.gouv.fr/culture/inventai/patrimoine/
click on "images" then "recherche experte" an other window opens, type "Lisieux" beside localisation, then click on "rechercher".
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Old August 22nd, 2010, 05:49 PM   #9
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A terrible loss
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Old August 25th, 2010, 02:09 AM   #10
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A terrible loss
It certainly is.
France wasn’t as devastated by WW2 as other countries. But it lost quite a few beautiful old towns especially in the N.W. part of the country : Abbeville, Beauvais, Caen, Caudebec… to name a few.

As far as I’m concerned (but it’s just me, and maybe I forget other destructions), I consider the complete destruction of Lisieux and the partial destruction of Rouen (both in Normandy) the worst losses of WW2 in France in terms of heritage and urban landscape.
In Rouen, destroyed districts were those along the Seine river, which had kept the special atmosphere of harbour districts and were among the most active and oldest districts of the city. Not only were many fine churches, interesting streets and old buildings destroyed, but the way the city was rebuilt completely cut the original connection between the city and its river.

In Lisieux, in a way, it’s even worse, as (nearly) nothing is left of a town which used to display a spectacular and well preserved domestic architecture and urban space of the late middle age / early renaissance. But at least, even if it’s gone, it’s well documented, compared to other cities which were destroyed or transformed earlier.

Here you can see fine drawings of the house of the Salamander
http://www.miscellanees.com/m/maisonlx.htm
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