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Old August 3rd, 2012, 05:12 PM   #3021
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Concrete is now being poured for the west wall.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 05:41 PM   #3022
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Update:
As the west wall is being poured, it appears that the southeast corner tower footing may be ready to receive concrete. The middle footing is getting ready to receive column reinforcement, and the drill is now working on the next pad.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 07:07 PM   #3023
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At the rate things are going, it seems that perhaps all three east side tower footings might be poured today. Currently, the west wall concreting continues. Column reinforcement installed in the two tower footing forms adjacent to the southeast corner tower footing, and it appears that the middle footing is ready for concrete, with workers working on the last of the east tower footing reinforcing.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 07:52 PM   #3024
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Hydraulic excavators are such versatile machines. Currently, the southeast corner tower footing is receiving concrete via the excavator, using its turned-around bucket like a ladle, transferring concrete from the mixers up on the street to the footing form.
Seeing these excavators, and comparing the methods of construction back in the day when cable machines were the rule, one can see the greater efficiency. I recall back then, for a similar job like this, you would require a crane in the pit for placing concrete and moving materials, digging done by power shovel, or cable pullshovels (backhoes), perhaps a small backhoe/loader for digging smaller holes, etc. Now, with quick couplers on the hydraulic excavator, it's just a matter of dropping an attacment, and picking up another in a matter of seconds for the task at hand. Back then, when hydraulic hammers were not available, there was quite a bit more blasting required. On this job, the excavators were used as: cranes for lifting, concrete wheelbarrow, rock breakers as well as excavating.
The three large excavators are Hitachi Xaxis 800 (the triple boom machine used as a crane) and the other two are Xaxis 850 machines. Also on site is a Hitachi short-swing excavator (the smaller one seen in the corner beside the air compressor), plus a mini-excavator.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 08:09 PM   #3025
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Is it more efficient to use the excavators than just running a track for the concrete the entire way from street level?
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 09:03 PM   #3026
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcatio View Post
Hydraulic excavators are such versatile machines. Currently, the southeast corner tower footing is receiving concrete via the excavator, using its turned-around bucket like a ladle, transferring concrete from the mixers up on the street to the footing form.
Seeing these excavators, and comparing the methods of construction back in the day when cable machines were the rule, one can see the greater efficiency. I recall back then, for a similar job like this, you would require a crane in the pit for placing concrete and moving materials, digging done by power shovel, or cable pullshovels (backhoes), perhaps a small backhoe/loader for digging smaller holes, etc. Now, with quick couplers on the hydraulic excavator, it's just a matter of dropping an attacment, and picking up another in a matter of seconds for the task at hand. Back then, when hydraulic hammers were not available, there was quite a bit more blasting required. On this job, the excavators were used as: cranes for lifting, concrete wheelbarrow, rock breakers as well as excavating.
The three large excavators are Hitachi Xaxis 800 (the triple boom machine used as a crane) and the other two are Xaxis 850 machines. Also on site is a Hitachi short-swing excavator (the smaller one seen in the corner beside the air compressor), plus a mini-excavator.
With all the progress the site is getting smaller. When do you think the role of the excavators will be over and a tower crane will be assembled?
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 09:05 PM   #3027
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isdmd10,

I'm assuming you meant a chute for the concrete when you said "running a track". No, it would not be an efficient manner to place concrete in this case. First of all, the excavation to bottom elevation, where the slabs on grade and footings are is about fifty feet plus down from the sidewalk level. There would be serious problems with the distance the concrete would have to move via chute, taking into consideration the slope of the chute from the street to wherever it was required. Too steep of a slope, the concrete would flow too fast, not enough slope, too slow. Plus, you would need intermediate supports for the chute also. Then there's the issue of moving it around. Then there's the issue of segregation of the concrete when chuted for long distances, which means separation of the aggregates (the coarse stone/gravel) from the mortar. In short, it's not a practical method.

The excavators are mobile, and versatile, and can place concrete where needed, as seen here.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 09:30 PM   #3028
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Kanto,

I'm going out on a limb with this one, as I don't know where the crane will be located for sure. Looking at the site plan, I will gander a guess and say that the crane would be placed on the 56th Street side of the site. I say this, and here again a guess, because 57th Street is a major two-way crosstown street in Midtown Manhattan. However, just three blocks west, One57 has been going up, with the climbing tower cranes on the 57th Street side, and the material hoist on 58th Street.

Considerations for placement of the crane will be the area coverage required to reach all parts of the working area, boom swing clearance from nearby obstructions (buildings), pick area (where building materials are hoisted at the street), storage requirements for extra tower sections for the crane, load capacity vs.boom radius, etc,etc.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 09:37 PM   #3029
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The pouring of the concrete is going nicely! With the concrete chute into the crane bucket. Nice...
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 10:36 PM   #3030
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Last report for the day.
The drill crew puts in a little O/T. The rest of the crew normally knocks off at 3:30PM (EST). the drill crew are continuing to drill, working on the third pad. If they work over the weekend drilling the remaining pads, it is conceivable that tendon installation can begin on Monday.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 11:55 PM   #3031
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcatio View Post
isdmd10,

I'm assuming you meant a chute for the concrete when you said "running a track". No, it would not be an efficient manner to place concrete in this case. First of all, the excavation to bottom elevation, where the slabs on grade and footings are is about fifty feet plus down from the sidewalk level. There would be serious problems with the distance the concrete would have to move via chute, taking into consideration the slope of the chute from the street to wherever it was required. Too steep of a slope, the concrete would flow too fast, not enough slope, too slow. Plus, you would need intermediate supports for the chute also. Then there's the issue of moving it around. Then there's the issue of segregation of the concrete when chuted for long distances, which means separation of the aggregates (the coarse stone/gravel) from the mortar. In short, it's not a practical method.

The excavators are mobile, and versatile, and can place concrete where needed, as seen here.
Imo there must be some other reason why they use this technique. I can eventually understand using excavators in the hole since this is a very tight space but I really cant understand that it seems to be characteristic to american construction sites to use buckets instead of concrete pump with feeding arm (one57 for instance) like this:



It seems obvious this technique is more efficient than moving buckets back and forward.
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Old August 3rd, 2012, 11:58 PM   #3032
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I got a question, will there be tendons only in the core or will they be in perimeter columns as well?
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Old August 4th, 2012, 01:18 AM   #3033
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Kanto,

Tendons are also in the perimeter columns of the tower, as well as in the core.

patrykus,

I have seen the method you illustrated in Chicago, and in New York, the building New York by Gehry (8 Spruce Street) had its concrete pumped during its construction. I think its a matter of contractor preference. Placement of concrete by bucket has been practiced in NYC for ages, with seemingly no loss in production. With the use of cranes with fast line speeds, hoisting buckets of 3 cubic yards, contractors here are able to get concrete placed quickly. Typically on a high-rise project, two buckets are used: one is filled at the street, while the other one is up at the working floor being emptied. Provided that there is a steady supply of concrete trucks, concrete can still be placed rapidly. Here again, I think its a matter of contractor preference. Either method is valid, as long as the concrete placement meets the construction schedule.
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Old August 4th, 2012, 05:16 PM   #3034
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The drill crew is working today, together with one of the excavators that is digging into some bedrock next to the wall on 56th street
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Old August 5th, 2012, 02:03 PM   #3035
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would be awesome if one of you guys that watch the webcam each day take a screenprint each day, then at the end put them all together so we get an awesome time lapse
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Old August 5th, 2012, 02:24 PM   #3036
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Already working on that.
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Old August 5th, 2012, 04:53 PM   #3037
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrykus View Post
it seems to be characteristic to american construction sites to use buckets instead of concrete pump with feeding arm (one57 for instance) like this:


It seems obvious this technique is more efficient than moving buckets back and forward.

its a matter of site logistics.

look at the site photo you posted and the site photo of one 57.


we use pumps here whenever it is feasible.
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Old August 5th, 2012, 08:37 PM   #3038
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And when it is not feasible? Method with buckets keep cranes occupied and cant be as fast and continuous as concrete pumps unless you delegate two cranes only for this job. I believe as mentioned earlier it is more matter of contractor preference and US construction tradition thing. How else can it be explained that this method is never seen (at least I have never seen it) anywhere outside the US?
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Last edited by patrykus; August 5th, 2012 at 09:01 PM.
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Old August 5th, 2012, 09:37 PM   #3039
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Quote:
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Already working on that.
i'm excited to see this time laps video then .

just took a look on the cam, amazing progress again...this tower will rise in no time
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Old August 5th, 2012, 10:00 PM   #3040
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrykus View Post
And when it is not feasible? Method with buckets keep cranes occupied and cant be as fast and continuous as concrete pumps unless you delegate two cranes only for this job. I believe as mentioned earlier it is more matter of contractor preference and US construction tradition thing. How else can it be explained that this method is never seen (at least I have never seen it) anywhere outside the US?

I live in Italy and I've seen this method used here. So?
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