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Old January 22nd, 2013, 03:20 AM   #5381
RobertWalpole
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Compared to most modern buildings, I think it will appear the exact opposite of glassy. Compared to older towers in new york though, I would agree.
Good points, but I disagree. The rendering looks pretty glassy. The overwhelming majority of the facade will be glass. We'll see.

Anyway, this will be a nice contrast to the other 57th St area super talls: 225 W57th, 0ne 57, and Torre Verre.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 03:47 AM   #5382
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It's not like not being glassy is a bad thing. In my opinion, NYC is defined by its fine use of steel, brick, stone and concrete in its buildings, until just last decade.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 09:43 AM   #5383
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True. Although I think that what you are really looking for is not material used but diversity of styles. The problem with 100% glassy towers is that they all somehow looks the same. They only differs in shape - that's exactly why I'm not a big fan of wtc, or hudson yards towers. They are great blocks, I have no doubt about that, but because of lack of diversity those projects are somehow separated from the rest of the city.

I'm glad 432 offers something different and new for a change with its not so glassy structural facade, which btw is not an opinion but a fact - only 56% of its surface is glass compared to your average glassy tower with its facade made in 99% of glass panels.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 12:07 PM   #5384
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here is a photo from the facebookpage of wilshire grand in los angeles. the two towers on the left and in the right corner beneath the photo reminded me of the future park avenue.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 03:20 PM   #5385
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Concrete pours are starting today
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 03:31 PM   #5386
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It's expected to go 1 floor every 4-5 days once we get to the main frame of the tower in a month or so. Multiply 4.5 by 89 floors and you'll get 400.5 days. That means it should top out in 1 year and 1 month, give or take a few weeks or so.
Don't forget to take out weekend and holidays....There are about 24 work days per month.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 04:32 PM   #5387
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Is it me or are those windows going to be huuuuuge?
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 05:15 PM   #5388
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looks like they are pouring where the rebar that I took pictures of was installed! Very quick.

What I don't get is why is there a concrete pump going up to the top of the core and then a pump going from a core to the lower and closer to the street area being poured at the moment. What is that about?
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 06:25 PM   #5389
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Great Wilshire Grand photo
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 06:49 PM   #5390
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looks like they are pouring where the rebar that I took pictures of was installed! Very quick.

What I don't get is why is there a concrete pump going up to the top of the core and then a pump going from a core to the lower and closer to the street area being poured at the moment. What is that about?
They are probably using a pump from the street to send concrete to the pump on the tower because the full infrastructure for the tower pump is not operational yet. Also, by sending concrete to the tower, they only need to have 1 pump truck, instead of 1 on one side and 1 on the other side.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 06:51 PM   #5391
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here is a photo from the facebookpage of wilshire grand in los angeles. the two towers on the left and in the right corner beneath the photo reminded me of the future park avenue.
In fact even the cladding of the taller buildings looks a lot like that of 432 Park
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 06:52 PM   #5392
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They are probably using a pump from the street to send concrete to the pump on the tower because the full infrastructure for the tower pump is not operational yet. Also, by sending concrete to the tower, they only need to have 1 pump truck, instead of 1 on one side and 1 on the other side.
Thanks for answering but I am not sure I follow that.

Why not pump just directly from teh street side to the area where they are pouring? Clearly it can be reached from street side.

Also, as this building grows taller how will the upper pump be fed. Via some SUPER LONG pump or does it get hauled up in buckets by the crane and then put in the pump?

Thanks in advance for the info!!
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 06:55 PM   #5393
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I can't imagine a pump reaching that far up so my bet is on buckets, but that's just my uneducated guess.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 07:19 PM   #5394
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I can't imagine a pump reaching that far up so my bet is on buckets, but that's just my uneducated guess.
Pumps reach up that high all the time - do you think people living on the top floor carry their water up by buckets in the evevators

The question is how much harder/more expensive is it to do that with concrete. I think I've heard of projects where it is entirely pumped up but I'm not sure.

Hopefully someone will inform us.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 07:40 PM   #5395
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do you think people living on the top floor carry their water up by buckets in the evevators

Of course not, they pay people to do it for them

As i understand it, the concrete will be pumped up through the core to another pump at the top and poured as needed.

Pumping concrete this high is so 5-7 years ago anyways
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 07:44 PM   #5396
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Thanks for answering but I am not sure I follow that.

Why not pump just directly from teh street side to the area where they are pouring? Clearly it can be reached from street side.

Also, as this building grows taller how will the upper pump be fed. Via some SUPER LONG pump or does it get hauled up in buckets by the crane and then put in the pump?

Thanks in advance for the info!!
I am not sure how it works, but I think almost definitely that they won't use buckets.

I think they will use a pump, feed from the ground floor and then pumping the concrete all the way up. That would be fixed to the building, and they will add more sections of pipe as the building grows. What I am not sure, if it would be pumped directly to that arm that we see, or there would be one pump from the ground floor up, and then it would be transferred to a smaller pump in the top, the one with the arm.
Also it could be that they have to use a few pumps once the building reaches certain height. For example one pump from the ground up to 25th floor, then it would be transferred to another from 25th to 50th, and so on.

What are they doing now I don't know, as you said, it doesn't sounds logic that they pump with the truck to another pump in the top, when the truck can pump directly. ( although that could be useful to pour the 57th st side, since I think the truck no longer reaches there)
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 08:02 PM   #5397
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Originally Posted by 600West218 View Post
Pumps reach up that high all the time - do you think people living on the top floor carry their water up by buckets in the evevators

The question is how much harder/more expensive is it to do that with concrete. I think I've heard of projects where it is entirely pumped up but I'm not sure.

Hopefully someone will inform us.
Well, but no truck pump can reach that high, they would have to install a piping network for concrete just like water has a piping network. But wouldn't that be too expensive? I mean the pipes would have to be thicker than the average water pipes and would take up more space. Do they have enough space and resources to do that? Wouldn't it be cheaper to just use buckets?
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 08:30 PM   #5398
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Well, but no truck pump can reach that high, they would have to install a piping network for concrete just like water has a piping network. But wouldn't that be too expensive? I mean the pipes would have to be thicker than the average water pipes and would take up more space. Do they have enough space and resources to do that? Wouldn't it be cheaper to just use buckets?
Of course it is more expensive, but remember that time is money. If they use buckets, there is no way that they could do a floor each 4 or 5 days, lifting a bucket that can only hold a relatively small amount of concrete all way up and the all way down each time, needing several buckets just to pour a single column. And not to mention that while they are using the crane to lift buckets of concrete, they can't use it for anything else.

As for space, it is not problem at all. It is not that big, it is a pipe of about 8", I think, that could go anywhere. Could go inside an elevator shaft, since the elevator won't be installed until the structure is topped out and the pumping system dismantled

If they have a mechanical lifting system for the core, it is logical they have a pumping system for the concrete.
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Last edited by CCs77; January 22nd, 2013 at 08:35 PM.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 08:35 PM   #5399
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Oh, I see, thanks for the explanation
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 08:41 PM   #5400
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What are they doing now I don't know, as you said, it doesn't sounds logic that they pump with the truck to another pump in the top, when the truck can pump directly. ( although that could be useful to pour the 57th st side, since I think the truck no longer reaches there)
I believe that the method they are using is actually faster/easier than trying to pump directly from the street. With their method, they just set up the big boom from the street once, and then they move the smaller boom on the core from place to place. The smaller boom is easier to manipulate, and of course it can reach all the sides of the building.

What I wonder about these long pumps: what happens to the concrete left in them when a pour is finished? I assume they have to be flushed out, and what remains goes to waste? Does it get recycled back into fill or something?
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