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Old September 8th, 2010, 04:23 PM   #1
diablo234
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Low Water Crossings

Does your city have low water crossings? Low Water Crossings provides a bridge when water flow is low. Under high flow conditions, water runs over the roadway and precludes vehicular traffic. This approach is cheaper than building a bridge to raise the level of the road above the highest flood stage of a river, particularly in developing countries or in semi-arid areas with rare high-volume rain. Texas has a few of them mostly around Austin and San Antonio because of the semi arid climate in that region.

For more information:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_water_crossings


Example of a low water crossing on RR2222 in Austin.


Example of a low water crossing on Spicewood Springs Road in Austin


Another example of a low water crossing on Spicewood Springs Road


Low water crossing on Lakewood Drive in Austin.


Same location except it is closed off due to heavy rain.

image hosted on flickr

Low water crossing bridge at Tuleta Drive at Breckenridge Park in San Antonio.


Low water crossing bridge on FM 1340 in rural central Texas.


Another low water crossing bridge on FM 1340.

Know of any other locations that have them?

Last edited by diablo234; September 9th, 2010 at 08:50 AM.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 04:37 PM   #2
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Never heard of them.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 04:53 PM   #3
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developing countries like the US?

sounds like a cheap solution to me

if the traffic volume is low enough then i dont see the point of paving roads like this

i suppose connecting parts of suburban areas with sub-500 aadt in places where rain is a rare event it might be a good idea, but in a continental climate where rivers flood at least twice for several weeks plus you get regular showers from spring to autumn it makes no sense
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Old September 8th, 2010, 05:01 PM   #4
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I've seen them on country roads in France, near Béziers.

There are sings like these:

Last edited by ChrisZwolle; September 8th, 2010 at 05:09 PM.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 05:07 PM   #5
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There are a few in BC, Canada, but only on very remote logging roads. Rather than have to drive around some of the largest lakes, drivers could take these short cuts and save a lot of time if the water is low enough. The UK has several of these crossings I know, A couple are affected by the ocean tide.

The proper term for a low water crossing is "ford"
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Old September 8th, 2010, 05:34 PM   #6
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There's an unimportant gravel road in Ljubljana (Slovenia) flooded by Ljubljanica river every once in a while. When I first drove there, I had no idea about it, and it just happened to be flooded, so I had to turn around and I was very surprised. Otherwise there are temporary roads under Lake Cerknica, which is an intermittent lake, so sometimes it's full of water, other times there's no water.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 05:57 PM   #7
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Oman: Near the red/white markings floodings can happen. I have seen more of these kind of situations (sometimes with warning signs) in Oman and the UAE.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 07:19 PM   #8
GENIUS LOCI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I've seen them on country roads in France, near Béziers.

There are sings like these:
That seems a provisional sign; probably they put it there because of an exceptional flooding or other unexpected natural disasters
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Old September 8th, 2010, 07:52 PM   #9
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Water crossing on road to Ngorongoro and Serengeti NP, Tanzania:

Dry season now, obviously. Larger flows are crossed with bridges.
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Old September 8th, 2010, 08:16 PM   #10
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I know about this one in Hungary, village of Kemence:

(from panoramio)

I have never seen something like this anywhere else in the country
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Old September 8th, 2010, 09:43 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BND View Post
I know about this one in Hungary, village of Kemence:

(from panoramio)

I have never seen something like this anywhere else in the country
Those are a regular feature in the UK countryside - mostly along narrow old roads which pre-date motor traffic such as the road in the photo above.
as already stated, they're called a ford and usually simply identified with a standard triangular warning sign with the word 'ford' on it.
They're usually only on routes which are crossed by drainage water, streams etc...cars just drive through them
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Old September 8th, 2010, 09:58 PM   #12
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They're quite common in South Africa, in particularly in the more arid regions where a low level bridge is dry for most of the time. I have never seen one in a suburban setting though, they are more of a rural thing.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 04:11 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gramercy View Post
developing countries like the US?

sounds like a cheap solution to me

if the traffic volume is low enough then i dont see the point of paving roads like this

i suppose connecting parts of suburban areas with sub-500 aadt in places where rain is a rare event it might be a good idea, but in a continental climate where rivers flood at least twice for several weeks plus you get regular showers from spring to autumn it makes no sense
That's why you only see them in places where flooding is a rarity, like Oman, Tanzania, and west Texas.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 04:28 AM   #14
diablo234
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Another example in Palo Duro Canyon in West Texas.


An example of a gate that closes the road if there is high water.

Last edited by diablo234; September 9th, 2010 at 05:06 AM.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 12:15 PM   #15
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Low water crossings we have in Greece in old roads or paths in country side...
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Old September 9th, 2010, 01:19 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post


An example of a gate that closes the road if there is high water.
I bet the cost to install the monitoring system integrated with the gates and maintain them over time is above the cost of building a county bridge.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 02:02 PM   #17
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I agree.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 04:18 PM   #18
diablo234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ed110220 View Post
They're quite common in South Africa, in particularly in the more arid regions where a low level bridge is dry for most of the time. I have never seen one in a suburban setting though, they are more of a rural thing.
They are usually found in rural areas in Central Texas usually along Farm to Market roads that have low traffic, however as urban sprawl occurs they are increasingly being found more and more in suburban areas as it takes awhile for the road infastructure to catch up.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 06:19 PM   #19
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Stanhope Ford on the River Wear, Stanhope, Co. Durham, England





http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&so...,30.91,,1,11.5
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Old September 9th, 2010, 06:56 PM   #20
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^ How deep do they expect the average car to wade through safely. It seems odd that cars don't state anywhere how high off the ground the air intake is. Until you can see that car going through that looks like any normal river, not something so wide and flat.
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