daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture

Architecture news and discussions on all buildings types and urban spaces
» Classic Architecture | European Classic Architecture and Landscapes | Public Space | Shopping Architecture | Design & Lifestyle | Urban Renewal and Redevelopment



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 6th, 2010, 09:54 PM   #61
Concrete Stereo
Registered User
 
Concrete Stereo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Lyon
Posts: 1,622
Likes (Received): 657

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taller, Better View Post
Of course I disagree. It is one of those blanket statements churned out by people who have probably never even been to North America, or Australia. There are plenty of places in Europe where the buildings are all quite similar, so why would that not constitute "cookie cutter" any more than North America? Are the Cotswolds in England "cookie cutter" because all of the cottages "look the same" ? Is Bath "cookie cutter" because all of the Georgian townhouses "look the same"? Of course not, because "cookie cutter" really is just an insult we like to use about areas other than our own cities.

I suppose this is not "cookie cutter" because it is European urban sprawl:


source of photo unknown

I'd say it was obvious from the beginning that this would eventually boil down to a Europe vs North America type thread.
untypically, this thread has been quite balanced until now.

It started off with Barcelona, Hongkong, Amsterdam and Athens
Concrete Stereo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 6th, 2010, 10:29 PM   #62
AMS guy
hipp-E
 
AMS guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Amsterdam
Posts: 10,307

To call the 17th-century canals area of Amsterdam a "cookie cutter city" is really weird. It suggests something boring or negative, while this city is unique

But alright, you want your cookie cutter, so here we go:













Last edited by AMS guy; October 6th, 2010 at 10:36 PM.
AMS guy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 6th, 2010, 10:46 PM   #63
The Cake On BBQ
Moderatr
 
The Cake On BBQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: anarres
Posts: 6,494
Likes (Received): 8692

Quote:
Originally Posted by Taller, Better View Post
Of course I disagree. It is one of those blanket statements churned out by people who have probably never even been to North America, or Australia. There are plenty of places in Europe where the buildings are all quite similar, so why would that not constitute "cookie cutter" any more than North America? Are the Cotswolds in England "cookie cutter" because all of the cottages "look the same" ? Is Bath "cookie cutter" because all of the Georgian townhouses "look the same"? Of course not, because "cookie cutter" really is just an insult we like to use about areas other than our own cities.

I suppose this is not "cookie cutter" because it is European urban sprawl:


source of photo unknown

I'd say it was obvious from the beginning that this would eventually boil down to a Europe vs North America type thread.
I didn't mention Asia or Europe because they've been already mentioned earlier in this thread.
__________________
Angkor What?
The Cake On BBQ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2010, 07:22 PM   #64
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rev Stickleback View Post
And the truth is loads of Europeans would live in such developments too, if they could buy them in Europe for the same price.

I remember reading a book by a guy from Zimbabwe moving to England, who couldn't understand why people would choose to live in the tiny London terrace houses. It took him a while to work out that a house of the size he'd prefer, in London at least, was so far out of his price range that it was ridiculous.
Then just come and live here in Belgium where you can live the Belgian dream :p
Cities lose inhab. and suburbs and suburban Towns gain inhab. in Belgium. Houses are not as big as in the USA because that would be impossible to pay unless you can pay a house of 1.000.000 euro. But most middel class live in three to four bedroom, freestanding houses.
Spatial planning sucks and toghetter with all the free standing housing, it feels like the whole country is develloped. There is no place you can go whitout seeing a house nearby, in Flanders at least, Wallonia is a diffirend story.

We can also provide you with the horor of strip malls and malls and miles of roads with large warehouses next to it.

Here is a tread on Suburbia in Belgium: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1157889

Example of a Belgian strip mall:


Example of a belgium mall:


How Belgian suburbs look like:







For ground pictures: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1157889
__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 04:16 AM   #65
đđeůx
Still Comin' Out Strong
 
đđeůx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 15,695
Likes (Received): 1980

Not that bad, I suppose. Do most Belgian cities have good public transportation from suburbs into the city?
__________________
ddeůx *
đđeůx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 06:05 AM   #66
dleung
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Point Grey
Posts: 2,629
Likes (Received): 131

I wouldn't consider Athens or Amsterdam or Barcelona "cookie cutter" just because their buildings look similar or are arranged rigidly. While there was the regulatory framework for repetitiveness, the populating of buildings happen in gradual accretion, and it is visually-evident through the subtle nuances between architectures of different eras.

The term "cookie cutter", however, suggests an element of speed by which identical buildings pop up quickly within one short period of time:







dleung no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 08:20 AM   #67
Ramses
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,042
Likes (Received): 21

Quote:
Originally Posted by dleung View Post
I guess that's the place where they invented depression
Ramses no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 04:23 PM   #68
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

Quote:
Originally Posted by đđeůx View Post
Not that bad, I suppose. Do most Belgian cities have good public transportation from suburbs into the city?
Most suburbs have bus connections. Some have train and bus or tram(lightrail) connections.
I think the bus connections in Belgian cities are good. Like in my little city (40.000 inhab) 12 buslines stop at the trainstation, connecting nearby villages, towns, cities. The longest line to another city is +-20km.

But you also have cities like Hasselt nearby (80.000) It forms the main crossing points of a lot of buslines around the region and trainlines that go from my region to other regions.

Train lines that stop in the trainstation:

ICE
Tongeren - Blankenberge (NMBS - trein)


ICK
Hasselt - Gent-Sint-Pieters (NMBS - trein)


IRc
Hasselt - Antwerpen-Centraal (NMBS - trein)


IRc
Hasselt - Luik-Guillemins (NMBS - trein)


IRe
Hasselt - Antwerpen-Centraal (NMBS - trein)


L
Hasselt - Leuven (NMBS - trein)


P
Genk - Brussel-Zuid (NMBS - trein)


P
Hasselt - Antwerpen-Centraal (NMBS - trein)

There are some 40 buslines that stop at the trainstation on 20 busperrons.Pretty nice for a city with only 80.000 inhab...
__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!

Last edited by joshsam; October 8th, 2010 at 04:32 PM.
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 05:23 PM   #69
Luli Pop
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,529
Likes (Received): 40

I totally agree with Dleung, many forumers confused cookie-cutter city with planified city.

Clearly Dleung's examples showed what a cookie-cutter city is.
Besides, I don't see the point for those houses to be dettached since they are almost attached. Spending more materials or just for a status impression?
Luli Pop no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 06:07 PM   #70
thun
Registered User
 
thun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 3,829

On a rough guess, about two thirds of Great British towns.
__________________
Folglich mein TagesTipp => Es genau so hinzunehmen wie ich es sagte. Notorisches Widersprechen wird nichts bringen. Ehrlich! Vertraut mir da voellig!
__________ __________ __________
thun no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2010, 11:55 PM   #71
Benonie
Bike It!
 
Benonie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 21,094
Likes (Received): 19874

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshsam View Post
Cities lose inhab. and suburbs and suburban Towns gain inhab. in Belgium.
Wrong.
That was correct untill ten years ago. Nowadays all cities are gaining inhabitants. Brussels came from 950.000 in the nineties and has passed 1.100.000 last year. Same thing in Ghent, Antwerp and smaller cities.
The expanding population, mostly by young immigrants and there growing families, is the main problem in the biggest cities (houses, schools, mobility...)
But you won't find 'coockie-cutter' cities here. Belgian cities grow 'organic' and rather chaotic.
Benonie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 9th, 2010, 12:03 PM   #72
joshsam
JR
 
joshsam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Sint-Truiden
Posts: 7,165
Likes (Received): 5408

I agree on the organic and chaotic cities, but last week there where new articles on "city flight" in the Belgian newspapers. Read the tread in Belgium forum.
Platteland of stad?
__________________
Ceci n'est pas un pays, een bananenrepubliek ja!
joshsam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 11th, 2010, 08:10 PM   #73
scottyaks143
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 18
Likes (Received): 0

Wow it looks like a 3d scene.. Nice one..
scottyaks143 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 05:50 PM   #74
ChitownCity
Registered User
 
ChitownCity's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: CGO, IL
Posts: 1,351
Likes (Received): 125

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramses View Post
I guess that's the place where they invented depression
ChitownCity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 05:52 PM   #75
ChitownCity
Registered User
 
ChitownCity's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: CGO, IL
Posts: 1,351
Likes (Received): 125

....
ChitownCity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 06:48 PM   #76
Saigongirl
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,074
Likes (Received): 11

What's the problem with the so-called "cookie cutter" urban planning?
I think Athens looks a lot like my hometown, Ho Chi Minh city (Saigon). Both look so messy and chaotic!
Similar houses in a row, with lots of greenery, are beautiful, don't you think?
Saigongirl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 07:23 PM   #77
ChitownCity
Registered User
 
ChitownCity's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: CGO, IL
Posts: 1,351
Likes (Received): 125

nothing's wrong with it as long as it's urban in my opinion. but when it's applied to single family homes then it becomes a problem. I love Athens, Barcelona, Amsterdam and all those other places. I would commit suicide if I were forced to live in south florida or any other generic suburb for the rest of my life...
ChitownCity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 09:39 PM   #78
dleung
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Point Grey
Posts: 2,629
Likes (Received): 131

High-rise sprawl gives a better return on the land, but is equally coma-inducing. Think of numerous developments in HK and China with dozens of identical towers spaced 20 feet apart... or even some of the new stuff going up in North American suburbs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramses View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by dleung
I guess that's the place where they invented depression
The pictures are in Toronto, btw. This map shows how much of the cityscape looks like the above picture:

Faded Red denotes sprawl from 1985 - 1999
Red denotes sprawl from 1999 - 2006
Yellow is all new sprawl since 2006

The rest of the city's area is mostly single-family houses (abeit older and with trees), but the regions highlighted is exactly like the picture - treeless, dense, cookie-cutter sprawl.
dleung no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 10:51 PM   #79
Penguino
Registered User
 
Penguino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 41
Likes (Received): 1

vancouver looks cooki cutter
image hosted on flickr

by DEE.GRAPHICDESIGN

image hosted on flickr

by ckkelley at ssp

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rtrska/3410602461/[
Penguino no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 12th, 2010, 11:18 PM   #80
Nouvellecosse
~ Mysterious Entity ~
 
Nouvellecosse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Halifax, N.S.
Posts: 4,447
Likes (Received): 313

I can see how someone would think the newer Vancouver condos are cookie cutter, but the last picture is of the office district and shows only office buildings that all have completely different designs. How much do you actually know about the city?
Nouvellecosse no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium