daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 2nd, 2011, 07:13 PM   #821
33Hz
Registered User
 
33Hz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 436
Likes (Received): 47

Looks like another Velaro
33Hz no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old June 2nd, 2011, 11:42 PM   #822
hmmwv
Registered User
 
hmmwv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,391
Likes (Received): 420

Quote:
Originally Posted by 33Hz View Post
Looks like another Velaro
facepalm.......
hmmwv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2011, 12:29 AM   #823
33Hz
Registered User
 
33Hz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 436
Likes (Received): 47

Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
facepalm.......
Irony not a strong point.
33Hz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2011, 11:14 AM   #824
33Hz
Registered User
 
33Hz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 436
Likes (Received): 47

The difference is that those other countries never claimed to have designed the trains or made them better. Now reality kicked in and it turns out they can't run at 380 km/h sustainably afterall. Wear and tear is too high, just like everyone else said, without major changes to the design. That's why the French took ten years and not ten months to develop a train capable of 360 km/h.
33Hz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2011, 04:39 PM   #825
Luli Pop
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,529
Likes (Received): 40

Quote:
Originally Posted by 33Hz View Post
That's why the French took ten years and not ten months to develop a train capable of 360 km/h.
so why did they take 45 years for constructing 1500KM of HSR while Spain did it in 15y and China in 2.
Luli Pop no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 3rd, 2011, 05:26 PM   #826
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,978
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luli Pop View Post
so why did they take 45 years for constructing 1500KM of HSR while Spain did it in 15y and China in 2.
Because it was unproven, new technology. They were trying to do it financially sound, one step at a time?

Spain basically got a bunch of big ass loans which are biting them in the ass right now, a really strong push to make it happen, a lot of empty (cheap) space in between big urban centers, readily available technology, etc.

China has an abudance of money and a strong need to improve their aging railway system, cheap labor, strong government to make things happen, relatively few rights for citizens to take into account, readily available technology which they took in and used as their own to keep costs even further down, cut costs on concrete quality which is now biting them in the ass, etc. etc. There are so many reasons to explain the differences between the countries' HSR-rollout, we could write ten books about it.
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2011, 02:01 AM   #827
foxmulder
Registered User
 
foxmulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,135
Likes (Received): 382

1)Who has the longest high speed rail network?

Currently, China has the world’s longest high-speed rail network with about 8,358 km.

2)Who has the fastest operational trains?

The original 8-car train-set recorded a top speed of 416.6 km/h (258.9 mph) during a trial run [3] and the longer 16-car train-set holds the world record for the fastest production train at 486.1 km/h (302.0 mph)

During a subsequent test on January 10, 2011, a CRH380BL set reached a new record speed of 487.3 km/h (302.8 mph), breaking the previous record held by the CRH380A.

The French record breaker train is stripped from its heavily modified form and no longer operational. Also, it is just a single highly modified record breaking train which really cannot be defined as operational anyway. After the record they put the two cars of the train under Eiffel tower as a show piece for some time... Current status of the train:





3)Who has the fastest operational lines?

China is the first and only country to have commercial train service on conventional rail lines that can reach 350 km/h (217 mph). Notable examples of HSR lines include:
The Wuhan–Guangzhou High-Speed Railway, a passenger-dedicated trunk line opened in 2009, that reduced the 968 km (601 mi) journey between the largest cities in central and southern China to 3 hours. Trains reach top speeds of 350 km/h (220 mph) and average 310 km/h (190 mph) for the entire trip.
The Beijing-Tianjin Intercity Railway, an intercity express line opened in 2008, that shortened the 117 km (73 mi) commute between the two largest cities in northern China to 30 minutes. Trains reach top speeds of 330 km/h (210 mph) and average 234 km/h (145 mph).

Basically whole 4+4 trunk network.

4)Who has the will to build fastest trains, largest and most modern network?

Combined answers for questions 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 present a really strait forward answer.

A single maglev line which suppose to be operational in 2025 does hardly qualifies to be the "largest and most modern network".

5)Who has the most potential users?

The high-speed trains have transported 600 million passengers since their introduction on April 18, 2007, with average daily ridership of 237,000 in 2007, 349,000 in 2008, 492,000 in 2009, and 796,000 in 2010. This is with a network in its infancy stage.

6)Who has already assigned budget to build fastest trains, largest and most modern network?

According to China Securities Journal, China plans to invest $451 to $602 billion in its high-speed rail network between 2011 to 2015. What Japan is spending is not even worth comparison.


foxmulder no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2011, 07:42 PM   #828
Svartmetall
Ordo Ab Chao
 
Svartmetall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Past: Northampton, UK (19 years), Auckland NZ (7 years), Now: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 14,074
Likes (Received): 8821

Okay, the posting here is getting a little vitriolic. Please try to keep the thread on topic and not compare systems in a derogatory manner. Thank you.
Svartmetall no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 8th, 2011, 03:46 PM   #829
7freedom7
Ill get 6 pack abs
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Beijing
Posts: 3,253
Likes (Received): 412

First EMU manufactured for Rio de Janeiro launched in Jilin


Photo taken on June 7, 2011 shows an electric multiple unit (EMU) in Changchun, capital of northeast China's Jilin Province. The first EMU manufactured for Rio de Janeiro of Brazil was launched at Changchun Railway Vehicles Co., Ltd. (CNR CRC) on Tuesday. A total of 30 electric multiple unit produced by CNR CRC will serve during the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Xinhua/Wang Haofei)


Staff members experience inside an electric multiple unit (EMU) in Changchun, capital of northeast China's Jilin Province, June 7, 2011. The first EMU manufactured for Rio de Janeiro of Brazil was launched at Changchun Railway Vehicles Co., Ltd. (CNR CRC) on Tuesday. A total of 30 electric multiple unit produced by CNR CRC will serve during the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Xinhua/Wang Haofei)


A Brazilian representative views the surface of an electric multiple unit (EMU) in Changchun, capital of northeast China's Jilin Province, June 7, 2011. The first EMU manufactured for Rio de Janeiro of Brazil was launched at Changchun Railway Vehicles Co., Ltd. (CNR CRC) on Tuesday. A total of 30 electric multiple unit produced by CNR CRC will serve during the 2014 FIFA World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. (Xinhua/Wang Haofei)

More at here :http://english.sina.com/china/p/2011/0607/376517.html
__________________
My Flickr photos
7freedom7 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 9th, 2011, 12:29 AM   #830
hmmwv
Registered User
 
hmmwv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Seattle
Posts: 2,391
Likes (Received): 420

This probably should be in the urban transportation board since it's a subway/lightrail train.
hmmwv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 9th, 2011, 06:10 PM   #831
Luli Pop
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,529
Likes (Received): 40

how much in U$S were those 30 EMUs?

anybody knows?
Luli Pop no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 9th, 2011, 06:48 PM   #832
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luli Pop View Post
how much in U$S were those 30 EMUs?

anybody knows?
Well, the cost per vehicle for Siemens Inspiro EMUs for metro systems is 1.29 million euros (1.87 million USD), so figure a discount off that price for the CRC product.

source:
http://www.railway-technical.com/finance.shtml
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2011, 05:07 AM   #833
Luli Pop
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,529
Likes (Received): 40

thank you!

anybody has real info?
Luli Pop no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2011, 06:56 AM   #834
Fan Railer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 660
Likes (Received): 568

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luli Pop View Post
thank you!

anybody has real info?
Does anyone have RELEVANT info to this thread?
Fan Railer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2011, 02:17 PM   #835
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,811
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
anybody has real info?
Well, after some searching, this article came up. My limited comprehension of Latin languages picked out a figure of $187 million for 34 trainsets, financed by loans from the World Bank. So that comes out to $5.5 million per trainset. Divide that figure by the number of cars per trainset to get a per vehicle figure.

http://correiodobrasil.com.br/novos-...mo-mes/250861/
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2011, 06:02 PM   #836
Luli Pop
BANNED
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,529
Likes (Received): 40

wow! it's less than a half of Siemens price.

anytime!
Luli Pop no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2011, 02:14 AM   #837
Fan Railer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 660
Likes (Received): 568

BACK ON TOPIC... with some videos of AL and BL sets testing on the Beijing Shanghai HSR Line:







Enjoy.
Fan Railer no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2011, 12:18 PM   #838
Mika Montwald
Improving Earth
 
Mika Montwald's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Planet EARTH
Posts: 111
Likes (Received): 3

Thank you Mr. Martin Grolms
Proof:> China innovations in creating a HSR steel track that can withstand a sustainable operating speed of 500+ km/hr

Link: http://www.materialsviews.com/detail...ail_Steel.html



Quote:
Travelling at 350 km/h! - High-Speed Rail Steel

by Martin Grolms published: 2011-06-13

High-speed trains are getting faster and faster. They play an increasingly important role in future traffic planning. High-speed trains are cost-efficient, relieve the national air traffic, and can take many passengers on board. According to the Chinese railway network development plan, a network of high-speed lines for passenger traffic will be created by 2020. It will comprise four east-west and four north-south routes that can be used at speeds between 250 and 350 km/h.

This leads to extremely high demands for the high speed rail lines. They have to withstand continuous and peak loads and the vibrations caused by the trains. The robustness required for 350 km/h high-speed rail steel may be met by greater cleanliness of the steel and a better quality of the casting blooms.

The PanGang Group Research Institute investigated technical measures on improving the steel cleanliness and strand quality of 350 km/h high-speed rail steel in the Panzhihua Iron & Steel Group Company, both in Sichuan, China. The researchers want to produce higher-quality railway steel by means of dephosphorization in BOF (Basic Oxygen Furnace), optimized refining slag, effective gas blowing, better mold electromagnetic stirring, and dynamic soft reduction. Zeng et al. applied a technology based on hot metal pretreatment, combined blowing BOF, ladle refining and Rheinstahl-Heraeus (RH) vacuum refining, and bloom casting followed by hot charging and hot delivery.

As a result, the dephosphorization rate was increased. Argon blowing was optimized and removal of inclusions was improved. Compared with the original production process of heavy rail steel, the purity of the steel and the inner quality of the blooms are evidently improved. Central defects in the casting blooms, such as segregation, porosity, shrinkage cavity, and cracks, were successfully minimized.

The Chinese researchers proved that the optimized process meets the technical requirements to produce 350 km/h high-speed rail steel and realized a stable production.
__________________
HUGE DENSE FOREST Covering Cities


Are you studying the Basic Traditional Proper CIVILIZED BEHAVIORS <弟子规> ??

Last edited by Mika Montwald; June 14th, 2011 at 04:35 AM. Reason: Suggested Cleaning Up by Moderator
Mika Montwald no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2011, 06:25 PM   #839
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,978
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mika Montwald View Post
Wondering aloud if some super d?mw?t and super sh?ll?w observers out there still want
to proclaim that China CRH is simply just some copycat of other nations HSR technologies.
Who has ever said that? I think the only point some people here have been trying to make is that China is simply basing it's HSR technology on existing technology from abroad. Which is logical and in no way an attack.

But then the tunnel-visioned fanatics get their panties all up in a bunch because they feel attacked and they apparently believe China's HSR is 100% it's own, and questioning that is like blasphemy to them.
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2011, 08:34 PM   #840
Svartmetall
Ordo Ab Chao
 
Svartmetall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Past: Northampton, UK (19 years), Auckland NZ (7 years), Now: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 14,074
Likes (Received): 8821

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mika Montwald View Post
Wondering aloud if some super d?mw?t and super sh?ll?w observers out there still want
to proclaim that China CRH is simply just some copycat of other nations HSR technologies.
If you continue to post things like this given the amount of clean up I've had to do in this thread, you will be brigged. Consider this a warning.

Keep the discussion on-topic and less inflammatory. There are members in this thread working hard to give useful information about rolling stock in China and its development. Don't spoil their good work with petty arguments. Thank you.
Svartmetall no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
china

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium