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Old December 28th, 2007, 12:06 AM   #2201
Anekdote
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I actually like the new announcements, but I dont like "Mong Kok East" one...
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Old December 28th, 2007, 06:22 PM   #2202
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MTR outlines rail extension plan
28 December 2007
South China Morning Post

An extension of the Sha Tin-Central Rail Link connecting Yau Ma Tei and Whampoa can be constructed separately from the project, a top MTR official said yesterday.

In the final draft submitted to the government earlier this year, the MTR and the then Kowloon Canton Railway Corporation agreed to build a station in Whampoa through an east-west extension from the Yau Ma Tei station on the Kwun Tong Line through Ho Man Tin - an interchange station to the Sha Tin-Central Rail Link.

The official, who declined to be identified, said it was possible the extension - which consists of only three stations - would be built first. "It is all subject to the government's decision, and it should be announced in one to two months," he said.

He said he hoped the extension, along with other routes including the South Island Line and the West Island Line - for which the consultation period ended yesterday - would be finished in five to six years.

In a Legislative Council document released in July, the government proposed that the link include 10 stations - Tai Wai, Diamond Hill, Kai Tak, To Kwa Wan, Ma Tau Wai, Ho Man Tin, Hung Hom, Exhibition, Admiralty and Central West.

The new link is supposed to converge with East Rail at Hung Hom station before crossing the harbour, but it has not been decided if the fourth harbour crossing would extend from East Rail or the Sha Tin-Central Line, which will determine which passengers get direct cross-harbour access.

Meanwhile, the MTR has seen a surge in passenger trips on West Rail and East Rail lines since the railway merger on December 2. Exact figures will not be available until the end of this month, but the official said he believed more passengers were taking the MTR given the savings on offer.
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Old December 28th, 2007, 07:00 PM   #2203
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Good to see that things are finally moving ahead on the main South Line.

I don't really understand why there has previously been a commencment in building the western extension of the Island Line to Kennedy Town. The need has been there for years and I had understood that detailed plans were finished some time ago?

On the South Line it seems that if the HKJC is willing to pay for the station in Happy Valley then why not build it, Happy Valley does get very jammed during peak periods and it would take some burden off the tram as well. Given how much tunneling will be undertaken for the South Line I guess that the geological problems can be resolved? (I'm assuming that it easier to tunnel south to Ocean Park in the route indicated than via Happy Valley).

And the west south Line is planned for when?
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Old December 28th, 2007, 07:16 PM   #2204
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I think that it was supposed to be parallel with the Aberdeen Tunnel.
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Old December 29th, 2007, 08:29 AM   #2205
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So the Admiralty- Ocean Park station will be the longest nonstop sector? How long will this single sector actually take on train?
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Old December 29th, 2007, 03:14 PM   #2206
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfgadv02 View Post
I think that it was supposed to be parallel with the Aberdeen Tunnel.
If you look at the preliminary layout posted by Aboveday, obviously the railway won't be parallel to Aberdeen Tunnel.

But if Happy Valley Racecourse station gets a green light, it will change the whole alignment between Admiralty and Ocean Park. In that case, I can see it to be parallel to Aberdeen Tunnel, and the Admiralty platform will probably be rotated 90 degree with tracks going east-west, rather the north-south as shown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddarkdom
So the Admiralty- Ocean Park station will be the longest nonstop sector? How long will this single sector actually take on train?
It is approx. 5 km long between Admiralty and Ocean Park take about 4 minutes to travel between two stations. The number are based on existing alignment without Happy Valley.

This won't make this section becomes the longest non-stop sector or longest tunnel. The longest will still be on West Rail between Tsuen Wan West and Kam Sheung Road; it takes 8 minutes just travel the 9 km section.
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Old December 30th, 2007, 03:57 PM   #2207
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Not liking the new announcements. East rail and west rail sucks without KCR.

I would rather them name West Rail Tuen Mun line or something, and East Rail Sheung Shui or Sha tin line, or call them NT East, and NT West.

East and West sounds too generic, it doesn't give the line enough definition, imho
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Old December 30th, 2007, 04:03 PM   #2208
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladisimo View Post
Not liking the new announcements. East rail and west rail sucks without KCR.

I would rather them name West Rail Tuen Mun line or something, and East Rail Sheung Shui or Sha tin line, or call them NT East, and NT West.

East and West sounds too generic, it doesn't give the line enough definition, imho
We've been using East Rail and West Rail for years now. Don't think people will suddenly forget what these mean when we only add the word Line to both names.
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Old January 1st, 2008, 07:48 AM   #2209
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Signaling glitch slows MTR trains
28 December 2007
Hong Kong Standard

A signaling glitch between the MTR Corp's Tsing Yi and Sunny Bay stations early yesterday caused delays of up to 37 minutes on the Tung Chung line and a temporary suspension of the Airport Express service.

About 400 passengers heading for the airport had to be transported by 14 shuttle buses.

Train services returned to normal at 8.06am after engineers completed repairs, nearly an hour after the glitch occurred at 7.15am and nearly half an hour after the Airport Express service was suspended for safety reasons.

"MTR trains traveling between Tung Chung and Tsing Yi stations were delayed, running at 15-minute intervals instead of the normal eight minutes," MTRC's corporation relations manager May Wong said.

"Train services between Hong Kong and Tsing Yi stations remained normal, running at four-minute intervals."

However, an anonymous caller to RTHK said he boarded a train at Tung Chung at 7.20am but it did not leave until 7.57am.

Other callers had mixed reactions to the halt.

One said the delay had caused him great inconvenience, while another, who was heading to the airport, said she was not significantly affected since she had made provisions for delays.
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Old January 1st, 2008, 12:25 PM   #2210
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
This won't make this section becomes the longest non-stop sector or longest tunnel. The longest will still be on West Rail between Tsuen Wan West and Kam Sheung Road; it takes 8 minutes just travel the 9 km section.
The longest section should be Airport Express from Tsing Yi Station to Airport Station, which takes 12 minutes.
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Old January 2nd, 2008, 06:26 PM   #2211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
But if Happy Valley Racecourse station gets a green light, it will change the whole alignment between Admiralty and Ocean Park. In that case, I can see it to be parallel to Aberdeen Tunnel, and the Admiralty platform will probably be rotated 90 degree with tracks going east-west, rather the north-south as shown.
The current alignment and the fact that the HKJC's addition of the Happy Valley stop not affecting the schedule for the South Island Lane (East section), probably means they'll do something like this old proposal where the line is in an "S" shape:



Quote:
Originally Posted by gladisimo View Post
Not liking the new announcements. East rail and west rail sucks without KCR.

I would rather them name West Rail Tuen Mun line or something, and East Rail Sheung Shui or Sha tin line, or call them NT East, and NT West.

East and West sounds too generic, it doesn't give the line enough definition, imho
Once the Kowloon Southern link and Shatin-Central link are done, the old East Rail Line will apparently be renamed "North South Line" and the West Rail Line + Ma On Shan Line renamed to "East West Line".
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Old January 3rd, 2008, 09:55 PM   #2212
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StanleyJ View Post
The current alignment and the fact that the HKJC's addition of the Happy Valley stop not affecting the schedule for the South Island Lane (East section), probably means they'll do something like this old proposal where the line is in an "S" shape:
That's one possibly way to build the Happy Valley station by extending the ESIL.
But the overall length of track will be longer to have terminus at Happy Valley rather than via Happy Valley.
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Old January 7th, 2008, 05:58 AM   #2213
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Riders on spur line rising but still falling short
Lack of taxis cited as one deterrent to using Lok Ma Chau rail service

7 January 2008
South China Morning Post

Use of the MTR Lok Ma Chau spur line has increased steadily since its launch in mid-August, but is still falling short of the expected 60,000 passengers a day.

Passengers said one reason for the shortfall might be the lack of taxi stands on the Shenzhen side, although transport links in general were continuing to improve.

In the 10 days to December 31, the spur line had a daily average of 44,277 passengers - higher than November's 36,172.

The former operator, the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation, had estimated that 60,000 passengers would travel on the Lok Ma Chau spur line every day within a year, eventually diverting about a quarter of the Lo Wu line's passengers.

The purpose of diverting traffic away from the busy Lo Wu checkpoint seems to have been met. Passenger volumes have generally declined at Lo Wu and the old Lok Ma Chau checkpoint since the opening of the spur line control point, only 800 metres from the old Lok Ma Chau checkpoint.

The railway link's passenger volume is nearing one-sixth of the Lo Wu figure and a third of the number on the Lok Ma Chau road crossing.

Businessman Sam Chan, 63, switched to using the rail crossing in October from ferry services between Hong Kong and Shenzhen.

"At least the spur line is clean and comfy with no need to squeeze myself into crowded compartments," said. Mr Chan, who takes the line about three times a week. "Getting off and on the vehicle at the border - if you take the cross-boundary buses - is quite a hassle." .

But Mr Chan said the lack of taxi stands on the Shenzhen side of the spur line was annoying.

There were only three bus routes connecting with the checkpoint when it was opened, but three more have since been introduced. An inter-city bus is now taking travellers to Changping, Dongguan , a popular destination for Hongkongers.

But passengers say they are disappointed that the Shenzhen Metro trains run infrequently from the checkpoint.

Shopkeepers on the Hong Kong side of the checkpoint said business was slow. One China Unicom phone-card store had a daily turnover of only HK$1,000 to HK$1,500, a staff member said.

Passenger Lo Kwan, 59, said the line should reduce the 10-minute interval between trains to attract more people. "A small shuttle train could run on the spur line between Sheung Shui and Lok Ma Chau more often."

The MTR Corporation said it would constantly review the train frequency according to passengers' demands. But general manager for marketing and station business Jeny Yeung Mei-chun said it had no plans to reduce fares or cut rents for tenants at the terminal.

But she said there were not enough transport links on the mainland side. The corporation has been trying to convince the Shenzhen government to allow more types of transport into the control point.

In a campaign ending today, the corporation has been offering up to 3,000 passes a day, allowing passengers to travel for free on East Rail to the Lok Ma Chau checkpoint. But the response has been lukewarm.

This follows the discounting of a weekly pass to HK$240, introduced in November by the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation - and resulting in disappointing sales.

Lok Ma Chau-bound trains leave Tsim Sha Tsui East and take the same route as Lo Wu-bound trains, until the last leg from Sheung Shui.
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Old January 7th, 2008, 06:17 PM   #2214
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MTR hits record as property play
4 January 2008
South China Morning Post

Shares of rail giant MTR Corp bucked the stock market's broad decline yesterday, ploughing ahead to a record high as investors chased the stock as a viable property play.

The stock added 3.25 per cent to HK$31.80 as the Hang Seng Index plunged 2.44 per cent to 26,887.28 points on global economic jitters.

Some analysts attributed MTR Corp's advance to "buying of laggards", but others said new rail projects in the pipeline fuelled buying interest, following the merger of underground services with Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp's rail network last month.

The stock's closing price yesterday exceeded the target prices of two major brokerages set in November - HK$29.10 by Merrill Lynch and HK$28.90 by Citi.

"MTRC was a laggard compared with other major property developers, which saw their share prices gain handsomely on recent interest rate cuts," JP Morgan analyst Raymond Ngai said. "Investors appear to be attracted to the corporation's potential in lucrative property development on new rail projects, especially the highly rumoured Sha Tin to Central rail link."

Rumours spread that the government would offer MTR property development rights above a planned depot at the former Kai Tak airport in east Kowloon to make the Sha Tin-Central rail project financially viable.

The government promised at MTR Corp's listing in 2000 that all new underground projects would generate a commercial return equivalent to 1 to 3 per cent, plus the corporation's weighted average cost of capital.

Negotiations on the Sha Tin-Central link project are continuing with the government, but an MTR official said last week that an extension linking Yau Ma Tei and Kwun Tong through Ho Man Tin could be built first. The Sha Tin-Central rail link and two other recently announced projects - South Island Line and West Island Line - were expected to be completed in five to six years, the official said.

UBS analyst Eric Wong expected MTR's profit in the next two to three years to be driven primarily by property development along the existing Tseung Kwan O rail line and the Elements shopping mall above Kowloon Station.

"Although the new projects won't be completed in a few years, they will be able to achieve a commercial return as the government promises," he said.

A Thomson First Call poll showed a consensus on MTR Corp's net profit of HK$6.13 billion for last year, a drop of 20.95 per cent from 2006, and earnings of HK$6.53 billion for this year.
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Old January 8th, 2008, 06:18 AM   #2215
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MTR plans shorter platform doors
8 January 2008
Hong Kong Standard

The MTR Corp will spend HK$300 million installing 1.5-meter-tall platform screen doors at nine elevated stations, it announced yesterday.

The company also plans to build public washrooms on the ground floor in three stations.

Before MTRC and Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp merged last month, the MTR had installed platform screen doors at 30 stations.

The screen doors at Tsuen Wan, Kwai Hing, Kwai Fong, Heng Fa Chuen, Chai Wan, Kowloon Bay, Ngau Tau Kok and Kwun Tong will be completed by 2012.

MTR said installing full-size screen doors on elevated platforms was as complicated as rebuilding an entire station since ventilation systems had to be completely remodeled.

In addition, some platforms could not support the weight of screen doors.

It therefore decided shorter gates, such as those used at the Disneyland Resort station, were more suitable for elevated platforms.

The washrooms will be built at Prince Edward, Quarry Bay and Ngau Tau Kok stations.

Less than half of the 82 MTR stations have washrooms, although there are facilities within four minutes' walking distance of 90 percent of the stations.

The company said it will find more sites for washrooms before seeking approval.

It will spend HK$13 million on the washroom project, which should be completed in 12 months.
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Old January 9th, 2008, 04:15 AM   #2216
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
MTR said installing full-size screen doors on elevated platforms was as complicated as rebuilding an entire station since ventilation systems had to be completely remodeled.

In addition, some platforms could not support the weight of screen doors.
But how would installing these 1.5m tall doors affect the conditions on the platform since it is elevated? Would it be more humid/warmer since the wind cannot directly blow through?
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Old January 9th, 2008, 05:06 AM   #2217
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But how would installing these 1.5m tall doors affect the conditions on the platform since it is elevated? Would it be more humid/warmer since the wind cannot directly blow through?
I think ventilation at elevated stations is minimal at present since there is plenty of circulation with the outside. Once the platforms are boxed in, they need to install a lot of fans and maybe AC as well to keep temperatures comfortable.
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Old January 9th, 2008, 05:35 PM   #2218
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Originally Posted by herenthere View Post
But how would installing these 1.5m tall doors affect the conditions on the platform since it is elevated? Would it be more humid/warmer since the wind cannot directly blow through?
In the article, it is saying if the full-size screen door is built, it will require to construct a ventilation system at these elevated platforms after they're boxed in as they are open to outside today. And constructing the ventilation system is just a complete reconstruction the whole platform since there is nothing out there now.

By installing the 1.5m high door, it eliminates the need of constructing a new ventilation system, consequently reconstruction of the platform.

I wonder why it's 1.5m high now. It's shorter than most adults, so your head/eyes are above the door. But then they are taller than those gates in Disney and Sunny Bay. Why not 2m? So it's a typical door height and taller than everyone.
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Old January 9th, 2008, 05:43 PM   #2219
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I don't think the PSDs need to be taller than the average adult. As long as the average person can't jump over it so easily, then it should suffice. 1.5m should be enough for that threshold.
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Old January 9th, 2008, 06:06 PM   #2220
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Yes, they don't have to be taller to serve the function.

But 1.5m is just a funny height where top of the door line up with your eyes, and all you see is nothing but a thick horizontal line in front of you instead of a clear wall-mounted ads or street view across the platform. It's an optical obstruction to say it the easy way.
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