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Old January 16th, 2009, 06:47 AM   #2521
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Don't forget, people don't have to live in Happy Valley, if they don't like the traffic they can live else where.

The closure of roads on racing nights is a bit of an issue, but the extra costs of putting in a station don't seem to be justified.

They could put a surcharge on all bets placed to cover the cost of a new station...

Cheers

Stuart
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Old January 16th, 2009, 07:33 AM   #2522
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KSD101 View Post
Don't forget, people don't have to live in Happy Valley, if they don't like the traffic they can live else where.

The closure of roads on racing nights is a bit of an issue, but the extra costs of putting in a station don't seem to be justified.

They could put a surcharge on all bets placed to cover the cost of a new station...

Cheers

Stuart
With or without an MTR station in Happy Valley, public transportation is convenient in this area
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Old January 16th, 2009, 03:27 PM   #2523
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KSD101 View Post
Don't forget, people don't have to live in Happy Valley, if they don't like the traffic they can live else where.

The closure of roads on racing nights is a bit of an issue, but the extra costs of putting in a station don't seem to be justified.

They could put a surcharge on all bets placed to cover the cost of a new station...

Cheers

Stuart
For a racecourse or stadium of that size that can hold 80,000 people or even more with the race track loaded in full house, there should be some kind of mass transportation in the at least medium rail scale to transport people out of the area in the minimal amount of time. Buses won't do the job, one double-decker can only hold up to 130 people; but one train can whole thousands.

Shatin Racecourse has its own station which only operates during event. All other times it just sits there. Many stadiums around the world has its own stations, or even a separate train line. Again, the surge of discharge requires extreme efficient transport to transport people out the stadium area. Especially in a very congested area. A underground link between HV and Causeway Bay will not do the same thing, it will take people to the nearest station of Causeway Bay after a walk of 15-20 minutes. But CWB is already very crowded. Can you imagine both HK Stadium and the Racecourse have events on the same day?

Leighton Road, Wong Nai Chung Gap Road and Morrison Hill Road area is already congested enough; it's hundred times worse when the road are closed. The closure causes grid lock not just in the Causeway Bay/Happy Valley/Wan Chai area just immediate around the racecourse, but the problem extend out and worsen the already over capacity Canal Rd Flyover towards Crossing Harbour Tunnel (or Wan Chai Interchange) to Gloucester Road both directions and inner Gloucester Road before Canal Rd Flyover towards Wong Nai Chung Gap Road Slip Road.

Residents live in HV and drive to work because there is no direct and fast mode of transport to the prime office area in Admiralty, Central, etc. and cross the harbour. By providing the MTR, it fill in the hole of lack of quick direct transport; it will encourage the use of public transportation rather than driving privately.
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Old January 16th, 2009, 06:17 PM   #2524
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港鐵(00066)參與杭州地鐵一號線項目投資建設及營運
16 January 2009

《經濟通通訊社16日專訊》港鐵(00066)表示,今日與杭州市政府及杭州市地鐵集團簽定原則性協議,就杭州地鐵一號線項目,以公私合營模式進行投資、建設及營運,雙方將進一步就杭州地鐵一號線的投資發展及為期25年的營運權進行磋商。

杭州地鐵一號線項目的總投資額為220億元(人民幣.下同),分A及B兩部分,分別佔總投資的63%及37%,A部分由杭州市地鐵集團負責出資,土木建造工程,而B部分將由港鐵及杭州市地鐵成立的特許經營公司出資及建設,並由其營運整條線,雙方分別佔特許經營公司49%及51%權益,B部分主要為機電設備工程。

杭州地鐵一號線項目為當地興建的8條地鐵線其中,已於2007年3月動工,全長48公里共30個車站,其中41公里為地下段,7公里為地面及高架段,預期2012年投入服務。
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Old January 17th, 2009, 10:34 AM   #2525
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Happy Valley Station

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Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
For a racecourse or stadium of that size that can hold 80,000 people or even more with the race track loaded in full house, there should be some kind of mass transportation in the at least medium rail scale to transport people out of the area in the minimal amount of time. Buses won't do the job, one double-decker can only hold up to 130 people; but one train can whole thousands.
Actually buses do the job pretty well. A few years ago I used to drive the 1M route which provided a shuttle between the racecourse and Admiralty, and business to Admiralty was marginal to say the least. Many people got in the cross harbour buses which were all lined up to take them cross the harbour - 5 minutes and they are through the tunnel. Many of those people will get onto the East rail line. A lot of people are just walking to get other buses to different parts of the island. All that to say, the crowds dispersed pretty quickly.

A lot of people would rather get a direct bus than have to deal with the interchange they would have to make on the MTR.

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Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
Shatin Racecourse has its own station which only operates during event. All other times it just sits there.
This station was built when railways were cheap, no tunnelling involved etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
Many stadiums around the world has its own stations, or even a separate train line. Again, the surge of discharge requires extreme efficient transport to transport people out the stadium area. Especially in a very congested area. A underground link between HV and Causeway Bay will not do the same thing, it will take people to the nearest station of Causeway Bay after a walk of 15-20 minutes. But CWB is already very crowded.
This assumes that all the people want or need to go to Causeway Bay which they don´t.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
Leighton Road, Wong Nai Chung Gap Road and Morrison Hill Road area is already congested enough; it's hundred times worse when the road are closed. The closure causes grid lock not just in the Causeway Bay/Happy Valley/Wan Chai area just immediate around the racecourse, but the problem extend out and worsen the already over capacity Canal Rd Flyover towards Crossing Harbour Tunnel (or Wan Chai Interchange) to Gloucester Road both directions and inner Gloucester Road before Canal Rd Flyover towards Wong Nai Chung Gap Road Slip Road.
The traffic in this area is pretty bad whether there is a race or not.

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Originally Posted by EricIsHim View Post
Residents live in HV and drive to work because there is no direct and fast mode of transport to the prime office area in Admiralty, Central, etc. and cross the harbour.
The people who live in Happy Valley are not big public transport users, and I doubt they will be rushing to get on a train that will already be full of people from the southern district. There are already a lot of people there who say they don´t want a station.

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By providing the MTR, it fill in the hole of lack of quick direct transport; it will encourage the use of public transportation rather than driving privately.
No it won´t, these people like travelling in their own car or a taxi - once you are used to that, itś very hard to get back on a crowded bus or train.

Stuart
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Old January 18th, 2009, 12:31 PM   #2526
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Happy Valley Alternatives

One way to improve the public transport and the environment in Happy Valley would be to invest in a modern tram system that would be attractive to the residents there.

This would produce much quicker results than waiting for an MTR station to be built. Better traffic management schemes to give priority to trams would help, speed them up.

Just some ideas to think about.

Stuart
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Old January 18th, 2009, 05:47 PM   #2527
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Hong Kong's MTRC in $3.2 bln Huangzhou rail project

HONG KONG, Jan 16 (Reuters) - Hong Kong's subway operator MTR Corp said on Friday it has entered into an agreement on the construction and operation of a metro railway project in Hangzhou, China, with the local government and a partner.

The Metro Line 1 project will span 48 kilometers and require an investment of 22 billion yuan ($3.22 billion), MTRC said in a statement received by Reuters.

MTRC will own 49 percent of a cooperative joint venture that will be responsible for the second part of the project, with the remaining 51 percent of the venture to be held by its partner Hangzhou Metro Group Company Ltd.

They will contribute a combined 37 percent of the 22 billion yuan investment required and construct Part B of the project, which mainly covers the electrical and mechanical systems, as well as the operation of the entire metro line, MTRC said.

The civil construction of the metro system of Part A of the project will be undertaken by the Hangzhou Metro Group, which will also have to put in 63 percent of the total 22 billion yuan of the investment required. ($1=6.836 Yuan)
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Old January 19th, 2009, 12:59 AM   #2528
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What do you think of the decision not to build a station at Happy Valley?

Updated on Jan 16, 2009
South China Morning Post

To conclude that there should be no station in Happy Valley for the MTR demonstrates that the evaluation of the cost and benefit of adding MTR stations is flawed.

Yes, based on patronage alone, Happy Valley does not generate direct financial benefits to justify the cost of building an MTR station there - even when taking into account the patronage during race meetings and the increasing number of public events at the Jockey Club.

However, aligning the South Island Line and adding a Happy Valley station at this stage of the process is the lowest-cost opportunity we have ever had to build a station there.

Once the South Island Line is in place, that option has been forfeited.

All major road junctions north, east and west of Happy Valley are heavily congested and traffic is only going to increase. This is not only because of an increase in wealth and relaxation of controls on cross-border traffic, but because of new traffic generators in Wan Chai (the Hopewell II, formally known as Mega Tower, and urban renewal projects), the south side (Ocean Park hotels, Wong Chuk Hang "upzoning", Aberdeen Fisherman's Wharf, Wong Chuk Hang Estate redevelopment) and Causeway Bay (various developments).

And there will be more traffic given the reluctance to frustrate private redevelopment rights.

There are no opportunities to increase vehicular road capacity.

The land is simply not available to further widen roads and junctions.

There is in fact a need to improve the quality of life at street level with the widening of pavements, improving pedestrian movement and squeezing the space for cars.

Any suggestion that a rationalisation of tunnel fares or the Central-Wan Chai bypass will bring relief are misplaced.

Therefore, in calculating the benefit of a station, a high value must be placed on the ability of Happy Valley residents to use the MTR as an alternative mode of transport given the increased risk of gridlock due to an accident, event or other incident.

Given the future risk of gridlock without any reasonable relief measure at hand, an even higher value must be assigned to every single reduction in vehicular movement that an MTR station in Happy Valley can generate.

Unfortunately, that is not how our Transport Department and officials responsible for the government's finances calculate things.

Nor will it be their problem, but one for future generations to resolve.

Paul Zimmerman, founding member, Designing Hong Kong

Copyright © 2009 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All right reserved
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Old January 19th, 2009, 01:02 AM   #2529
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No station for Happy Valley in MTR plans
South Island rail draft due out soon
Anita Lam
Updated on Jan 14, 2009
South China Morning Post

Happy Valley has lost the latest round of its battle to convince the government to give it a station on the MTR's South Island line.

Draft plans for the line, which will be published by mid-year, would not include a Happy Valley stop, a senior government source said yesterday.

Several Wan Chai district councillors have been lobbying for such a stop, saying it would shorten peak-hour travelling times between Happy Valley and Admiralty and Aberdeen.

But the government source said the station would add between HK$1.6 billion and HK2.8 billion to the HK$7 billion cost of building the line and extend the time needed for construction by between 10 months and 31 months. It would also lengthen journey times between South Horizons and Admiralty from 9 minutes to as long as 13 minutes.

"In fact, I doubt how many residents of Happy Valley would actually prefer to travel one stop to Admiralty," the source said.

Even without building a station there, congestion in Happy Valley should ease because some people currently travelling through the area by road would take the train, the source claimed.

The Transport and Housing Bureau would consider other options to connect Happy Valley to Causeway Bay by way of pedestrianisation or building a tunnel for pedestrians.

Meanwhile, the source confirmed that the first draft of plans for the new Sha Tin-Central rail line would include a station serving the Hin Keng Estate in Sha Tin, since the station would not cost too much to build and the area had a sufficient population to justify an MTR stop.

"Tai Wai is the point at which this Sha Tin to Central link will meet the MTR's Ma On Shan line and East Rail. We expect the area's population to multiply in the future. An extra station in the area can help share the burden of Tai Wai station," the source said.

The draft plans for both lines will be subject to public consultation.

Work on building the lines is expected to begin in 2010 and 2011 and to provide work for 14,000 people.

The government is under pressure to speed up infrastructure projects to provide work amid the downturn.

Work on building the MTR's West Island line and the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong high-speed rail link, and surveying work for the Hong Kong-Macau-Zhuhai bridge, will begin this year.

The government has also finished a feasibility study for a rail line linking the Shenzhen and Hong Kong airports and is studying how to give travellers between the airports the feeling they are transferring between terminals of the same airport.

A different government source had earlier indicated the line could include a station in Yuen Long.

However, the source who spoke yesterday said the government was still studying whether Yuen Long had a population sufficient to justify building a station that would serve as a border control point. If a station were built, it would be at the end of a spur line from the airport link to Hung Shiu Kiu and serve as an interchange with the MTR's West Rail line. That should boost usage of the airport link, the source added.

Copyright © 2009 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All right reserved
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Old January 19th, 2009, 04:13 PM   #2530
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MTR expected to apply for fare rises in July
9 January 2009
South China Morning Post

The MTR Corporation is likely to apply for fare rises in July as the change in the composite consumer price index over the past two months has hovered around 3 per cent - a rate that triggers a fare-rise mechanism.

The deputy secretary for transport and housing, Shirley Yuen, told lawmakers at a transport panel meeting yesterday that it is too early to say if MTR Corp would be able to ask for a rise as December's CCPI figure was not yet finalised, but she said year on year the index had risen from 1.8 per cent in October to 3.1 per cent in November.

The corporation agreed to give up its fare autonomy upon the merger with the rail operations of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation in December 2007. It subjects itself to a fare adjustment formula that takes into account the inflation rate and change in the transport sector's nominal wage index.

As MTR Corp promised upon the merger to freeze fares until the end of June, July would be the first month where any fare adjustment was possible.

If the formula - 0.5 x CCPI + 0.5 x change in nominal wage index, minus a productivity factor - comes to plus or minus 1.5, MTR Corp is allowed to adjust fares. Miss Yuen said the current calculation already came to 1.5.

Lawmakers said raising fares at a time of economic difficulties was totally unacceptable, especially when a number of concessions now offered by the rail operator expired by June.

Tam Yiu-chung, chairman of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong, criticised MTR Corp for its handling of the HK$2 elderly fare.

"Even after it decided to reinstate the concession, it moved it from Sunday to Wednesday. It gives others an impression that [MTR Corp] is insincere," he said.

MTR Corp announced the removal of its HK$2 elderly rate on Sundays upon its expiry on January 1, following a similar move by the four local bus companies. All five public transport operators reinstated the concession after severe criticism from the community, but the rate on the MTR now applies on Wednesdays rather than Sundays.

MTR Corp chief executive Chow Chung-kong said the elderly seemed to have accepted the new arrangement as 180,000 of them travelled by MTR this Wednesday, higher than the average of 170,300 on Sundays.
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Old January 20th, 2009, 04:40 AM   #2531
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PCCW, Airport Express hook up to offer Wi-Fi access

Getting to the airport just got a little more convenient - but at a price.

Paul Mozur

Tuesday, January 20, 2009
The Standard

Getting to the airport just got a little more convenient - but at a price.

Under a scheme put together by the MTR Corporation and PCCW, passengers can now hook up to wireless service (Wi-Fi) on the Airport Express.

The convenience of checking e-mail on the way to the airport will cost you. Passengers will need to pay HK$20 for a 24-hour PCCW Wi-Fi package.

MTR senior manager Annie Leung Ching-man said the new service on the Airport Express is part of a larger campaign to bring Wi-Fi to Hong Kong's public transport systems.

During the campaign, which began in 2004, 30 MTR stations along the Island, Tsuen Wan, Kwun Tong and Airport Express lines have been fitted with Wi-Fi.

But Leung said this is the first underground train to offer the service. PCCW hopes to fit out an additional 20 stations over the coming year and a feasibility study is underway into the installation of Wi-Fi in double-decker Kowloon Through Trains (KTT) that run between Hong Kong and Guangzhou.

If all goes well, Leung said, that project could begin as early as next year.

The MTR said it chose the Airport Express as the first train with the service because it is heavily used by business travelers.

"With this service, busy travelers can send e-mail and keep track of their business up to the last minute before they catch their flights," Leung said.

Around a third of an average of 35,000 daily passengers on the Airport Express are business travelers.

Leung said that, with the exception of a few cities, access to Wi-Fi services has not yet become common in Asian countries.
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Old January 21st, 2009, 06:37 AM   #2532
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MTR Press Release:
MTR Wins Contract to Operate Stockholm Metro
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Old January 21st, 2009, 03:21 PM   #2533
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 03:24 AM   #2534
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So under the contract, MTR gets profits, then what does the Stockholm Metro (SL) get?

I guess the MTR is too smart to expand into the U.S.=too much work would be needed to rehabilitate our systems...
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 07:25 AM   #2535
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MTR East Rail Line Sha Tin
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source: http://flickr.com/photos/iliveinphilippines/3218889787/

灣仔站 (Wan Chai)
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銅鑼站 (Causeway Bay)
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金鐘站 (Admiralty)
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 09:29 AM   #2536
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Yay!
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Indeed. Stockholm SSCers are all liking this.
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So under the contract, MTR gets profits, then what does the Stockholm Metro (SL) get?
SL gets, hopefully, a better running and cleaner subway than Veolia (aka Connex) has provided. The stockholm subway is run on subsidies and ticketsales combined anyway, so SL never makes a profit.
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 10:10 AM   #2537
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Connex are terrible operators. They run Melbourne's rail network, and they're rubbish at it. Hopefully MTR will win the contract to run Melbourne's trains soon as well (they are shortlisted at the moment)
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 06:54 PM   #2538
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Connex were so terrible running the UK's "South Central" routes that they had to be replaced prematurely.
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Old January 24th, 2009, 12:19 AM   #2539
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In fact, Connex sucked so bad that they had to re-brand the whole company world-wide. But enough about them. MTR is very welcome to Stockholm
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Old January 24th, 2009, 03:51 PM   #2540
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Connex are terrible operators. They run Melbourne's rail network, and they're rubbish at it. Hopefully MTR will win the contract to run Melbourne's trains soon as well (they are shortlisted at the moment)
The following Press Release would even angers you!

Why the hot weather impacts our train network

-- They really need to replace the A/C for the trains!
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