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Old May 11th, 2009, 06:45 PM   #2621
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after I watched the video again, I realized one thing. The woman and the child are actually Korean. She did speak Korean to the boy.

The man has mistaken them as China Mainlander the whole time.

So that's why the woman did not leave at the beginning as she didn't understand what he was saying.

Don't know what that Korean woman have thought about Hong Kong from here. Her impression of Hong Kong would have changed forever and ever!
What an embarrassment!

Last edited by HSBC; May 11th, 2009 at 06:56 PM. Reason: error
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Old May 11th, 2009, 06:54 PM   #2622
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If this kind of thing happens in say like Singapore, Australia or Canada, the people would have informed the train station controller or someone in charge, someone will be waiting for this man in the next station to kick his butt.
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Old May 11th, 2009, 10:00 PM   #2623
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It is possible that he has deep psychological problems which would cause his unusual behaviour. I would hope that people would take a rational approach instead of jumping to conclusions. Violence is not the key.
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Old May 15th, 2009, 04:55 AM   #2624
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Hey guys, I found an interesting clip showing the new journey between Lohas Park [aka Tseung Kwan O South] to Tseung Kwan O. The journey seems to take 3 min!

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Old May 16th, 2009, 03:59 AM   #2625
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Sounds like it was some kind of testing between Lohas and TKO.
It feels like you were riding that Disney "Space Mountain" roller coaster which run in a complete darkness. lol
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Old May 20th, 2009, 01:51 PM   #2626
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Gov't Press Release:
LCQ9: Commissioning of Kowloon Southern Link
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Old May 20th, 2009, 03:12 PM   #2627
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Free trips offered in safety drive as MTR mishaps rise
19 May 2009
South China Morning Post

Railway passengers can win a free trip on the MTR from today if they follow all the safety rules when riding on its escalators.

MTR Corp announced its latest tactic yesterday in a fresh round of safety promotion as accidents on escalators continued to rise.

The enlarged railway network saw 812 such accidents last year, up 14.7 per cent from 2007 before the merger of MTR Corp and Kowloon Canton Railway Corporation operations. The number has been rising over the past two years. There were also 257 accidents involving train doors last year.

In the light of the problem, for the coming month the MTR Corp will reward 50 passengers per day who follow all the safety guidelines. They include holding on to handrails, not walking on escalators and not standing at edges of steps.

Passengers are also advised against rushing when the train doors are closing and carrying bulky items onto the escalators.

MTR deputy operations director Li Yan-tai said 100 ambassadors, mostly secondary school students, would pick the winners. "The secret agents will go undercover and observe our passengers. They will select those who show particular awareness of the safety rules."

The free ticket is not valid for cross-boundary routes and the airport express.

Meanwhile, losing balance and standing too close to step edges continued to top the list of reasons behind the accidents.

Winton Au Wing-tung, Chinese University associate professor of psychology, said a lack of safety awareness was one of the factors, although in many other cases commuters were aware of the risks and chose to ignore them.

In a survey commissioned by Dr Au on 1,003 passengers this month, 41 per cent said they did not feel unsafe not holding onto the escalator handrail, and 51 per cent thought it was safe walking on escalators.

The survey found 67 per cent of the respondents had walked on the escalators before, while 44 per cent said they had carried bulky luggage on the electric belts, although 71 per cent knew this was not a safe practice.

Nine in 10 respondents knew they should not stand close to the step edge, but 9 per cent admitted they had done so before.

On rushing between train doors that were about to close, 87 per cent of those polled said the practice was unsafe but 41 per cent had done it anyway.

"Many passengers know what is the right thing to do but they don't always put that knowledge into practice," Dr Au said. "Many of the interviewees believe they can handle the risks, or they think it will not happen to them."

Accidents involving escalators were very common across the city. Seven people and a cat were injured in one day last month in Lei Yue Mun Plaza in Yau Tong. The cat almost lost its left front paw and its left rear leg after being trapped between the steps of the escalator.

And three people fell down the stairs after an elderly woman lost her balance and fell on them in 2006.
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Old May 22nd, 2009, 02:40 AM   #2628
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MTR Press Releases:
MTR Corporation Recognised for Excellence in Sustainability

Newest MTR Travel Counter Welcomes Visitors at Hung Hom Station

MTR Proposes Half Fare Promotion for Eligible Persons with Disabilities

MTR Extends Monthly Pass Promotions for One Year
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Old May 26th, 2009, 01:29 PM   #2629
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Gov't Press Release:
West Island Line to proceed with Government's funding support
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Old May 30th, 2009, 11:04 AM   #2630
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HK Govt To More Than Double Funding For MTR's New Rail Proj
26 May 2009

HONG KONG (Dow Jones)--The Hong Kong government said Tuesday it will more than double its funding support for the construction of MTR Corp.'s (0066.HK) new rail project.

The government will increase its funding to up to HK$12.7 billion from the HK$6 billion originally planned in 2006, it said in a statement.

The increase is 'a reflection mainly of price escalation and increase in the scope of the works,' the government said.

Construction of the West Island Line, the extension of the MTR network to the Western District of Hong Kong Island, will start as soon as legislature approves the plan, the statement said.

The project will create 3,000 jobs during the construction period up to 2014, and another 2,500 jobs during its operation, it said.
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Old June 3rd, 2009, 08:51 AM   #2631
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By LovingNikon from HKADB :

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Old June 8th, 2009, 12:36 AM   #2632
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Quote:
Wiring thieves strike at MTR

Diana Lee

Monday, June 08, 2009

Thirty meters of electrical wiring were stolen from the MTR tracks last week but passengers were never in danger, the corporation said yesterday.

The wiring was stolen from the tunnel connecting Tsing Yi and Sunny Bay stations last Tuesday and Wednesday, with a third instance of theft on Thursday from the Tsing Yi station area itself.

"The wires were discovered to be missing after operating hours during routine checks by MTR maintenance staff. The situation was immediately addressed and train services were not affected," a spokeswoman said.

The corporation would not speculate on the motive behind the theft, though the cost runs into thousands of dollars.

Police said MTR staff had reported early on Tuesday and again on Wednesday that 15 meters of electric wiring at the Tsing Yi tunnel valued at HK$21,000 was missing.

On Thursday, a further 18 meters of wires were cut away. The cost has yet to be ascertained.

Police have classified the case as theft and the Kwai Tsing District Crime Investigation Team has taken over the case. No arrests have been made as yet.

District Councillor Leung Chi-shing, himself an MTR train captain, said the removal of cables is easily detected by the central operator and would not affect train safety.

It is unlikely to have been an inside job, he added.

"Every MTR employee knows very well the railway is under surveillance 24 hours a day. Not only permanent staff but also the outsourced workers should understand the consequences of committing crimes of such a nature," he said.
Source: http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_d...=20090608&fc=1
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Old June 8th, 2009, 05:28 PM   #2633
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Rail staff want union for casuals after theft
8 June 2009
South China Morning Post

MTR Corporation staff plan to set up a union to monitor the work of contract workers, following the loss of 33 metres of power cables from the track at Tsing Yi station last week.

Police are investigating the theft and no arrest has been made. A police source and a veteran repairs and maintenance staff member both said the thief was likely to be someone familiar with rail operations.

Tse Hon-bun of the Hong Kong Railway General Union said it would seek approval from the MTR Corp to form a union for contract and casual workers. Many contract workers worked on the railway tracks at night, he said, but not all of them were required to register. "Sometimes only their supervisor is required to do so."

Currently, only management-level staff members are responsible for monitoring such workers, but Mr Tse said frontline staff should also be allowed to assist. The MTR Corp should also step up its nighttime security measures, he said.

Last Tuesday before operations began, MTR Corp staff discovered that 15 metres of power cabling worth about HK$21,000 had gone missing from a tunnel near Tsing Yi station on the Airport Express line. The problem was promptly fixed and service was not interrupted.

The company reported the theft to police on Wednesday, but another 18 metres of cabling was found to be missing on Thursday.

Mr Tse said: "This time the damage did not affect our operations, but if it was the signalling system that the thief fiddled with, there could be more serious consequences."

Last week's incidents were the latest in a series of such thefts - others being at various construction sites. The copper inside the power cables can be recycled.

Mr Tse said the cables stolen last week were not used for the main power supply and a backup system was available. The more important cables were usually covered so it would be more difficult for outsiders to gain access to them.
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Old June 9th, 2009, 05:03 PM   #2634
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Asia's efficient metros show the world how to do it
5 June 2009
Financial Times

When Phil Gaffney, then chief executive of Hong Kong's MTR Corporation, visited the Tokyo Metro, he encountered a problem. He repeatedly asked what the metro's target for train reliability was, without receiving an answer. He was asking the wrong question, it eventually emerged. On the Tokyo metro, it was unacceptable for any train ever to break down.

The story illustrates the demanding standards of the metros in the richest Asian countries, one of the world's fastest growing markets for urban mass transit. Many of the cities such metros serve - including Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore and Taipei - are among the world's most heavily populated and densely packed. These conditions make the cities perfect environments for metros and poor territory for competitors such as the private car.

This reliance on metros puts heavy pressure on operators to maintain the highest standards. As a result, people familiar with reliability figures circulated privately among operators say large Asian metros - particularly Tokyo, Taipei and Hong Kong - regularly feature in the top five.

These high standards come at a cost. The Tokyo system has considerable built-in redundancy - much signalling and other key equipment is expensively duplicated, so a spare can be used if one breaks down. Many systems were financed by very high property values in the largest Asian cities. Nearly every station on Hong Kong's metro is in the middle of a huge shopping development.

There are lessons for others in the excellent records of Asian metros.

According to Nigel Astell, an associate at Steer, Davies, Gleave, a transport consultancy, it is no coincidence that the admired Asian systems are mostly newer than counterparts in Europe and North America. They were constructed using the latest techniques - in contrast with New York, where platforms are lined with awkward iron pillars supporting the roof. More is known about metro design than in 1863, when London's first line opened, or in 1900, when the Paris metro started operation.

"With an older system, you have to make the best of a bad job," Mr Astell says. "If you have one that was built more recently, it's a much easier job to achieve a higher level of customer satisfaction, because you're starting with something that feels more modern and spacious."

At the heart of Asian metros' success, says Mr Gaffney, is the ability to run trains as tight as two minutes apart. That results from good technology and station management. During its first 12 years, the Hong Kong system experienced severe overcrowding partly because its train control system was unreliable. "When people don't have that certainty of delivery, you then have people pushing on and your platform dwell times go up." A new signalling system persuaded passengers that trains would follow at regular intervals.

"When passengers felt confident in that system, they would make their choice on the platform and, if the train was crowded, wouldn't try to get in because they knew in two minutes there would be another," he says.

Automatic driving systems - where trains drive themselves between stations, without driver intervention - have numerous other advantages.

"You're taking one of your variables out," Mr Gaffney says, referring to the variations in service caused by different drivers' styles. "As soon as you have automatic driving, you get other benefits. It's more efficient."

Automatic driving opens the way for platform-edge doors - which line up with the precise spot where the automatic system will stop the train's doors and open only when a train is in the station. Such doors - in widespread use in Hong Kong and on Singapore's highly-regarded system - help to stop passengers wedging open doors and prevent falls on to the track, and suicides.

On a more prosaic level, Mr Gaffney praises the Tokyo metro's resistance to the long-term trend of cutting platform staff. It often has six staff on each platform shepherding passengers on board. The time saved is huge.

"You can probably save 15 to 20 seconds' dwell time by managing that operation better," he says.

Yet Asian metros' excellent record is not all bad news for western Europe and North America. In some cases, it is a tribute to the expertise of longer-established systems. London Underground engineers advised on the building of the Hong Kong and Taipei systems, while Singapore's system was closely based on that in Hong Kong.

That expertise is now flowing the other way. Mr Gaffney produced an influential report that was part of turning round performance on London Underground's Northern Line, while Singaporean engineers have been upgrading the city's Victoria Line.
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Old June 10th, 2009, 12:06 AM   #2635
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That article is stupid, it makes a meal of automatic trains and HK's two minute frequencies when Paris uses automatic trains and has higher frequencies. Funnily enough it's one of those "old systems" that the article lambasts.
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Old June 10th, 2009, 03:09 AM   #2636
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Can you explain why the tunnel is so completely dark?
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Old June 11th, 2009, 04:01 PM   #2637
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Source : http://www.pbase.com/annfran











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Old June 12th, 2009, 08:22 AM   #2638
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
That article is stupid, it makes a meal of automatic trains and HK's two minute frequencies when Paris uses automatic trains and has higher frequencies. Funnily enough it's one of those "old systems" that the article lambasts.

It doesn't really give all the details to make a valid comparison between different systems.

In Hong Kong, the critical issue is the interchange at Admiralty between 2 of the lines where one train will empty out several hundred people who walk 20 metres across the platform to get on another train. On a 2 minute frequency, you don't need much delay from one or two trains for your schedule to go out the window. It is quite possible for two trains to arrive and unload, before there havebeen a departure on the opposite platform.

Hong Kong people are also not that patient and will try and push on into almost non existent spaces, despite the fact it holds up the train.

Cheers

Stuart
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Old June 12th, 2009, 02:53 PM   #2639
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New Exits are going to be built under TST MTR Station.

Gov't Gazette on June 12 2009:
MTR Tsim Sha Tsui Northern Subway(Underpass) and Entrance Modification Works

Drafts from the Highway Dep't:
Draft 1

Draft 2

Draft 3
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Old June 13th, 2009, 03:15 AM   #2640
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KSD101 View Post
It doesn't really give all the details to make a valid comparison between different systems.

In Hong Kong, the critical issue is the interchange at Admiralty between 2 of the lines where one train will empty out several hundred people who walk 20 metres across the platform to get on another train. On a 2 minute frequency, you don't need much delay from one or two trains for your schedule to go out the window. It is quite possible for two trains to arrive and unload, before there havebeen a departure on the opposite platform.

Hong Kong people are also not that patient and will try and push on into almost non existent spaces, despite the fact it holds up the train.

Cheers

Stuart
If you didn't notice, I used the logic of the article to highlight it's stupidity. The reasons for the differences in frequency are rather insignificant to me.
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