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Old July 25th, 2013, 08:49 PM   #3361
Silly_Walks
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I had no idea they were already working on Whampoa station. Thanks!
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Old July 26th, 2013, 02:19 PM   #3362
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I was surprised too when I went there to visit a friend and was confronted with construction, construction everywhere. Thats what I like about China, there is always good surprises about the progress of construction whether its skyscrapers or railway projects. That being said, it kinda made sense its U/C as the project has a 2015 deadline if you didn't start now how would you finish? Ill post some more pictures later.
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Old July 26th, 2013, 06:34 PM   #3363
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saiho View Post
That being said, it kinda made sense its U/C as the project has a 2015 deadline if you didn't start now how would you finish?
You push back the deadline... well, that's how that goes where I'm from
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Old July 27th, 2013, 06:39 AM   #3364
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
You push back the deadline... well, that's how that goes where I'm from
You must be from the United States. If I'm wrong, it's okay, joke still works, haha -.-
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Old July 27th, 2013, 07:56 AM   #3365
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You must be from the United States. If I'm wrong, it's okay, joke still works, haha -.-
Netherlands... joke still works indeed
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Old July 31st, 2013, 03:27 AM   #3366
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
You push back the deadline... well, that's how that goes where I'm from
Where I am from some projects seem to have no deadline.

Ho Man Tin Station interchange station with the Sha Tin to Central Link and the Kwun Tong they started digging into the mountain.

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To Kwa Wan Station
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South Horizons Station
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Old July 31st, 2013, 05:11 AM   #3367
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MTR in line to cut Fo Tan fallout
The Standard
10 July 2013







The MTR aims to minimize inconvenience to passengers during refurbishment work that starts tomorrow at Fo Tan station.

The HK$110 million improvement project, to be completed in 2015, will enclose the open space now separating the two concourses to create one enlarged paid area.

"To minimize the inconvenience to passengers, three tracks at the station will be closed one at a time during the summer break from July 11 to the end of September,'' said MTR Corp project manager for operations projects Jason Wong Chi-chung.

During the morning peak period, three special trains that usually start from Fo Tan will do so at Sha Tin station to carry passengers forward to Hung Hom or Mong Kok East, Wong said yesterday.

With schools out and no horse races scheduled, demand for train services is less than usual at this time of the year and fewer passengers will be affected.

Construction work will be carried out in non-rush hours to minimize noise nuisance.
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Old August 6th, 2013, 01:08 AM   #3368
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The old M-trains on urban lines will get a second major refurbishment.

http://www.mtr.com.hk/eng/tenders/C1066-13E.html
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Old August 6th, 2013, 03:21 AM   #3369
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Good.. Because some of those trains look really ancient and kinda dark inside.
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Old August 6th, 2013, 07:10 PM   #3370
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scion View Post
The old M-trains on urban lines will get a second major refurbishment.

http://www.mtr.com.hk/eng/tenders/C1066-13E.html
They are upgraded in tandem with the signalling upgrade as well.
http://www.mtr.com.hk/eng/tenders/3036.html

So in the long run other trains on current running lines (except ex-KCR lines and South Island Line (East)) will need some sort of refurbishment too. At least they have to interface with the new signalling system.
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Old August 8th, 2013, 12:28 PM   #3371
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Hong Kong MTR to export its rail-property model to China
3 August 2013
South China Morning Post

Overseas rail projects will generate more revenue than MTR's domestic operations by 2020 as the city's sole rail operator gears up for international expansion. On the mainland, most of the space above railway stations and depots is empty Lincoln Leong, MTR deputy chief

MTR wants more overseas projects, especially on the mainland, where it is promoting its rail-and-property model as a solution to debt-laden railway businesses. While Shenzhen's Metro Line 4 is now the only railway that has adopted this model, MTR said it was discussing with the Foshan and Guangzhou governments the building of an inter-city link where building costs would be subsidised by developments along the route.

Lincoln Leong, MTR's deputy chief executive, said there were more potential projects in the western and coastal regions of the mainland.

As more mainland cities look to the property financing model as an alternative to heavily subsidised rail projects, fewer new rail projects in Hong Kong would use the model. That is because any new lines extending the old Kowloon-Canton Railway (KCR) network must stay in the hands of the government.

The Northern Link and the Tuen Mun-Tsuen Wan Link now in the middle of public consultation, for example, will be funded and owned by the government, with MTR merely acting as a franchise operator.

While franchise operations offer higher returns in percentage terms, they generate lower earnings than projects built and run by MTR. As the State Council is looking for more sustainable ways to finance rail development and Premier Li Keqiang told his cabinet last Wednesday that inter-city and suburban lines would be open to private investors, the mainland could be a source of growth for MTR.

But Leong said Hong Kong would remain MTR's "bread and butter" market for a long time.

"The ebitda [earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation] margin of our local rail-and-station commercial operations exceeds 50 per cent, while our overseas projects, usually awarded to us in the form of franchises, have a margin of 3 to 5 per cent," he said.

Half of the 10 new rail projects planned for after 2015 - including the South Island Line (West) and the North Island Line - are not part of the old KCR network and can still remain under MTR's ownership.

That said, the mainland is an important market for MTR, especially considering that the rail-and-property model has allowed the company to get hold of valuable land in prime locations.

"On the mainland, most of the space above railway stations and depots is empty because it is not easy to put up a building there without expertise and know-how. That land will be wasted anyway if we don't use it," Leong said. "Now the government can use what we pay for the land to subsidise the railway's operation."

Unlike in Hong Kong, where development rights along the line are awarded as part of a rail project, the two require separate bidding on the mainland, although bidding is said to be "tailor-made" for the operator. For Shenzhen Line 4, MTR receives an annual subsidy of 520 million yuan (HK$658 million) for the line's operation and maintenance like other rail projects in the country. But unlike current practice, it bears the loss if the subsidy and fare income fail to cover expenses.

Analysts said separating the rail and property businesses would increase MTR's risk when such projects grew in number.

"In Hong Kong, MTR contracts out the property projects to developers, which pay for the construction costs and bear most of the risk. But under the mainland model, MTR literally becomes the developer," said Cusson Leung of Credit Suisse.

But he said it was natural for MTR to look for growth overseas, as he expected the firm's land bank in the city to be depleted by around 2020.

While MTR's rail lines in London, Stockholm, Melbourne and the mainland contributed HK$35.7 billion, or 35.8 per cent, of revenue last year, they made up less than 6 per cent of the corporation's bottom line. Leong said mainland and overseas projects would soon make up a bigger portion of earnings, with six more lines being bid on.
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Old August 8th, 2013, 10:03 PM   #3372
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Hong Kong MTR to export its rail-property model to China
But he said it was natural for MTR to look for growth overseas, as he expected the firm's land bank in the city to be depleted by around 2020.
Makes sense.

I mean, after year 2020, the number of areas where you can build new train lines diminishes rapidly........simply because they already have presence within the said geographic area.

Once it reaches that point:
The best that they can do locally at home would mainly be confined to:
1) Refurbishments and renovations
2) One station extensions
3) Short distance line connections
4) Purchase of new trains

That's basically it.

P.S.
Question: Would it be feasible for MTR to enter the Macau transport market?
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Old August 9th, 2013, 04:41 AM   #3373
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
P.S.
Question: Would it be feasible for MTR to enter the Macau transport market?
Macau is too small to sustain a subway network and they already are planning to build a light rail system.
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Old August 9th, 2013, 04:52 PM   #3374
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Macau is too small to sustain a subway network and they already are planning to build a light rail system.
The Macau 'light rail' will actually be an elevated metro, and not like light rail in the rest of the world (for example the real light rail in Yuen Long).
In mainland China they just call these things 'light rail', probably cause they are light compared to actual trains
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Old August 10th, 2013, 04:11 AM   #3375
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
The Macau 'light rail' will actually be an elevated metro, and not like light rail in the rest of the world (for example the real light rail in Yuen Long).
In mainland China they just call these things 'light rail', probably cause they are light compared to actual trains
It's really 'light'. A freaking expensive minibus really .



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Old August 10th, 2013, 04:50 AM   #3376
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Is that seriously what it's going to be? In earlier things I've read about it, it was clearly an elevated metro, despite the name :S
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Old August 10th, 2013, 08:52 AM   #3377
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Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post



Is that seriously what it's going to be? In earlier things I've read about it, it was clearly an elevated metro, despite the name :S
businessnewsmacau.com
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Old August 10th, 2013, 06:59 PM   #3378
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Ahh, probably too low capacity to be called 'metro', but it still isn't 'light rail' either, which "is typically an urban form of public transport using steel-tracked fixed guideways that operate primarily along exclusive rights of way" (Or in other words: a beefed-up tram ) ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_rail ).


It seems the Macau Light Rail falls in the "Light Metro" category:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium_capacity_system
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Old August 14th, 2013, 07:03 PM   #3379
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East Rail station work to start soon
Wider trains on new link route mean changes to platforms and new screen doors
13 August 2013
South China Morning Post


Racecourse



The MTR Corp will start modifying platforms at East Rail stations soon to accommodate new trains and will install screen doors as a part of the construction of a new link connecting Tai Wai to Admiralty.

The rail company said it had recently finished a study on platform modification at Racecourse station, and if work there went smoothly, it would start modifying platforms at other stations from October. Screen doors would be installed afterwards.

The modifications are to accommodate new trains that are 2.54cm wider than the existing ones and which will run on both the East Rail line and the Sha Tin-Central link.

The 37 nine-car trains, made in South Korea, will arrive in 2019, and the new link's general manager, Dr Philco Wong, expected the modification work would be completed a year before.

The first phase of the link, connecting Tai Wai and Hung Hom through Diamond Hill, Ma Tau Wai and Ho Man Tin, will open in 2018. The cross-harbour section, from Hung Hom to Admiralty, will be ready in 2020.

Wong said the modification work included fortifying the platforms and reducing the curve of the track. It had to be done section by section, and every three metres of work would take two weeks. Stations in the north such as Sheung Shui would be tackled first.

Construction would be carried out at night and trains running the next day would not be affected, the MTR said.

The curve of tracks would be slightly changed in what the railway operator said might be the biggest modification to the century-old line.

Existing trains on the East Rail line are 12 cars long.

The MTR said that with a new signalling system on the line, train frequencies could be increased from a train every three minutes to a train every two, and it said it hoped that would compensate for the reduced capacity of each train.

Meanwhile, the MTR said there were 2,000 to 3,000 construction vacancies in its five new line projects. It has about 11,000 construction workers on its projects currently.
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Old August 15th, 2013, 06:50 AM   #3380
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
East Rail station work to start soon
Wider trains on new link route mean changes to platforms and new screen doors
13 August 2013
South China Morning Post

The MTR said that with a new signalling system on the line, train frequencies could be increased from a train every three minutes to a train every two, and it said it hoped that would compensate for the reduced capacity of each train.
Hmm, I usually hear about train frequencies increasing, but not along with a reduction in capacity per train. Does anyone know off the top of their heads what the theoretical net capacity would be currently and with the new trains during a peak hour? Thanks!
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