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Old October 24th, 2004, 12:19 AM   #341
hkskyline
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The machine shown above is geared towards non-Octopus users, such as tourists, who do not want to pay a deposit fee to use the Octopus card when they're only visiting for a few days. Hence they will opt to pay a little more per fare to use the traditional magnetic cards. Octopus add-value machines work a lot simpler. Insert the money and tap the card.

KCR and MTR fares are not integrated. The merger is still being planned right now so passengers transferring between the two networks will have to exit and enter gates accordingly, paying a fare to each operator. However, there are now transfer discount schemes not just between the railway companies, but also with certain bus routes as well.

Racecourse is an intermediary station. On racing days, some trains will serve that station and continue to Kowloon / Lo Wu, but other trains will still use the regular routing.
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Old October 24th, 2004, 12:35 AM   #342
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
The machine shown above is geared towards non-Octopus users, such as tourists, who do not want to pay a deposit fee to use the Octopus card when they're only visiting for a few days. Hence they will opt to pay a little more per fare to use the traditional magnetic cards. Octopus add-value machines work a lot simpler. Insert the money and tap the card.

KCR and MTR fares are not integrated. The merger is still being planned right now so passengers transferring between the two networks will have to exit and enter gates accordingly, paying a fare to each operator. However, there are now transfer discount schemes not just between the railway companies, but also with certain bus routes as well.

Racecourse is an intermediary station. On racing days, some trains will serve that station and continue to Kowloon / Lo Wu, but other trains will still use the regular routing.
How do the transfer rebates work? After the rebates, do you actually pay for the distance you travel or do you pay for 2 train journeys minus a bit of rebate only?

The HK SAR Government was willing to construct a Station that is to be opened only on race days? There must have been a compelling reason behind why they decided to spend so much on constructing a new station there and yet receive much less in return as after all, the station isn't open 7 days a week. Anyways, how many race days are there in a week or a month?

Why ain't the Station open on other days? Is there not enough human traffic generated on non race days from surrounding areas? (residential, commercial). The area surrounding racecourse station is just the racecourse itself and empty fields or are there any other developments?

Thanks for answering my many many queries...
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Old October 24th, 2004, 12:51 AM   #343
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Transfer rebates are automatically deducted when the Octopus card is used. For example, if I use a free shuttle bus that takes me to a KCR station, I will get charged when I tap my Octopus card upon boarding, but once I get off and tap again at the railway station, the bus fare will be deducted.

Racecourse is actually just off the main line and there is a depot there, so building a station wasn't very difficult. The race course is also served by buses, but it's much easier to relieve congestion by having a railway link there as well. Other than that there isn't much around there. The nearest residential areas are served by Fo Tan station on the main line.
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Old October 24th, 2004, 01:01 AM   #344
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From : http://hkrpm.hk.st/





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Old October 24th, 2004, 01:45 AM   #345
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchan7
Probably for ventilation in case the train's electric systems break down.

Oh, and anyone know why the PSD retrofit project uses Kaba doors, but all brand-new stations (and North Point's new platform) use some other kind of door?

The Kaba doors look much better...
Can you post some pics of how different the doors look like?

There could be a variety of reasons as to why PSDs in newer and older Stations differ.

For one, it could be due to the difference in the design of the platforms. Since the platforms in the older Stations from the start were not designed to be installed with PSDs in the first place, the authorities had to install whatever PSD they could install on these older platform which perhaps posed some limitations as to what types of PSDs can be installed. But since the newer Stations were designed with PSDs right from the start, there is no point installed the same made to order PSDs as in the older Stations, they could just use a totally different PSD.

Somewhat similar would be the tactile floorguide system being retrofitted in Singapore's MRT. They are basically the same but with some differences. The ones in the much newer North East Line are grey and made of granite whereas the ones on the older lines are silver and made of metal. They differ because the ones on the older lines are retrofitted ones, meaning that just screwed and inserted these metal floor guides/studs into the floor and the task is done. Whereas the newer line was designed with tactile floor guides from the start, the granite tiles that cover the floor have been designed to incorporate these tactile features as part of their design.

Get the idea?
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Old October 24th, 2004, 02:48 AM   #346
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Old & New
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Old October 24th, 2004, 04:42 AM   #347
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20 October 2004

Extension of Second Trip Discount for East Rail



Octopus card users can enjoy a 20% fare discount* on every second trip made within the same day. This offer also applies to East Tsim Sha Tsui Station, making journeys to and from Tsim Sha Tsui cheaper and faster than ever before.

During the same period, Light Rail will also extend the enhanced bonus scheme of Personalised Octopus card.

For details, please call KCR Hotline at 2929 3399 or refer to promotional leaflet.

* This offer does not apply on journeys to and from Racecourse or Lo Wu stations.
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Old October 24th, 2004, 06:16 AM   #348
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That's Fo Tan depot in the picture, right?
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Old October 24th, 2004, 06:43 AM   #349
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
There could be a variety of reasons as to why PSDs in newer and older Stations differ.

For one, it could be due to the difference in the design of the platforms. Since the platforms in the older Stations from the start were not designed to be installed with PSDs in the first place, the authorities had to install whatever PSD they could install on these older platform which perhaps posed some limitations as to what types of PSDs can be installed. But since the newer Stations were designed with PSDs right from the start, there is no point installed the same made to order PSDs as in the older Stations, they could just use a totally different PSD.
I want to add some more explanation why the PSDs are different. As the installation of PSDs in existing stations must not affect the normal train operation, the PSDs must be able to be operated even the PSDs are partially installed on the platform. The PSD design for the existing stations is seperated into upper and lower parts whereas that for new stations is installed as a whole. Therefore, the PSD design for new station cannot be applied to the existing station. The reason why MTR Coporation does not use the PSDs in new stations with design same as those in existing stations, even though they can be installed on new platforms as well, is the design for new station is simplier, faster to install, cheaper. So there is no need to have the same designs for new and existing stations.

P.S. The PSD design for existing stations is designed by Hong Kong engineers, which is also the first PSD design that can be applied on operating platforms in the world.
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Old October 24th, 2004, 07:29 AM   #350
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Maybe Kaba (Swiss company) designed their doors for Hong Kong's unique retrofit project. The retrofit doors all have "KABA" printed at the bottom of the glass panels.

MTR Tsuen Wan Line, Kwun Tong Line, Island Line (Jordan Station, Tsuen Wan Line pictured). Retrofit using doors produced by Kaba.


MTR Tseung Kwan O Line (2002), North Point new platform (interchange with TKO line), Tung Chung Line, Airport Express Line, KCR West Rail, KCR East Rail's East Tsim Sha Tsui Station. Hong Kong Station of MTR Tung Chung Line pictured. All these stations come built with PSDs included; who made the doors?


As shown in the pictures, the retrofitted doors look more like a single larger plane of glass and a small strip of aluminium at the bottom. The doors that come with new stations have a much larger brushed-metal section and look more like two separate pieces assembled together.

Personally, I prefer the retrofit doors' appearance.
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Old October 24th, 2004, 11:10 AM   #351
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The refurbishment of the older KCR trains is amazing. I mean I actually at first glance thought that the train to the left of the picture was a new West Rail train and that the one to the right was a new East Rail train and thus I had assumed that ER & WR each used a different type of the new trains, just like how TCL trains ply the TC route only. The reality was however, that those are just different generations of KCR trains...like those you have on the MTR...so both types run together on the same line.

What led to this confusion was just the fact that the refurbishment had been done so well! But why did they refurbish the older KCR trains anyways, aren't the trains quite new as compared to the older MTR ones?
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Old October 24th, 2004, 11:37 AM   #352
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The older KCR trains are only 3 years younger than the oldest MTR trains (the East Rail line was electrified in 1982). But I guess trains that were bought for the Island Line (opened 1985) were a bit newer than the older KCR trains.
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Old October 24th, 2004, 08:04 PM   #353
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Trains to/from mainland China share the same set of tracks as the KCR commuter trains.

Photos by Ben2004 from a Hong Kong transport forum :














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Old October 25th, 2004, 04:54 AM   #354
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Fare cut ruled out as new line opens - 30,000 passengers use TST East in first six hours of operation
Scarlett Chiang
25 October 2004
South China Morning Post

A fare cut on the new Tsim Sha Tsui East extension was not possible at the moment, KCRC chairman Michael Tien Puk-sun said yesterday on its first day of operation.

Speaking after the opening ceremony, Mr Tien said there was no room for a reduction as the fare was decided by the competitiveness of the new line and the choice of other public transport, not the volume of passengers.

"People may say that if there are 300,000 or 400,000 passengers, it means you can lower the fare," he said. "But I may say if there are 300,000 or 400,000 passengers, it means the price is reasonable. If it is reasonable, why lower the price?"

He was responding to a protest by representatives of the Democratic Party who staged a rally at the station to complain about the fares.

The fare from Sheung Shui to Tsim Sha Tsui East is $12 and from Hunghom to TST East $3.90.

In response to complaints of poor signage after last Sunday's trial, Mr Tien said the company had put 300 more signs in the station.

And the new station was divided into different colour zones to guide passengers more clearly.

Secretary for Environment, Transport and Works Sarah Liao Sau-tung said it was appropriate that Korean and Japanese words had been included in signs for tourists' information, on top of English and Chinese.

The new Tsim Sha Tsui East station officially opened at 3pm but 30 people queuing outside the station rushed in to take the first train at 2.45pm.

One, a Mrs Cheung who waited for an hour to enter the station, said: "I heard from the TV and radio news that the new station would be opened today so I came."

One of the passengers on the first train to depart Tsim Sha Tsui East was Kim Leung, 14, a student at Queen's College.

He said he was a railway fan so had to "get the first glimpse of the train departing the new station. I am very excited to take this train".

He got Mr Tien to autograph a KCRC souvenir.

More than 30,000 passengers had used the line by 9pm. A shopkeeper selling accessories in the new station said many people had visited her shop after the public were allowed into the station.

"They are mainly local people," she said. But business had not been particularly good because most of the people were just window shopping.

The opening of the rail link has already hurt business on the number 6 minibus route from Jordan MTR station.

"Usually there is a long queue of people waiting for minibuses on Sundays," driver Suen Yiu-tong said. "Now there is a long queue of minibuses."

He said there was an obvious decrease in the number of passengers already but "the effect will be fully shown tomorrow, the first weekday".
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Old October 25th, 2004, 06:14 PM   #355
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From the newspapers :









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Old October 26th, 2004, 01:26 AM   #356
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...Any ideas from the Hong Kong experts here?

One additional note: I will admit that the new station are far superior in their design, facilities, and aesthetic elements compared to even the newly renovated stations. The disparity between the PSDs still bugs me, though.
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Last edited by superchan7; October 26th, 2004 at 04:00 AM.
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Old October 26th, 2004, 03:55 AM   #357
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The disparity in train models bug me too. And thats just the start, don't forget the differences in ticket machines, fare gates etc etc. As long as something is different, it bugs me...haha... Wonder if anyone else there is as bugged by these things as me too... I dont mind the architecture being different, but I wished everything that was metal to at least be the same...or else everything lacks a sense of uniformity.
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Old October 26th, 2004, 03:59 AM   #358
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The grayer trains are newer (~2002-2003) and are from a ROTEM/Mitsubishi joint effort. They are much quieter and have plug doors (one of the factors in the noise reduction), and the motors sound much newer. They have been said to generate reliability problems, though, although I don't think this occurs on a significantly regular basis.

The new trains usually run only on the Kwun Tong Line (green), although they have been spotted numerous times running other lines (except Tung Chung line, with its proprietary CAF/Alstom trains that run much faster).
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Old October 26th, 2004, 04:06 AM   #359
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Why do plug doors sound quieter? Why should they? I saw a video of the new greyer trains with the plug doors, very nice, like a spaceship! Why the sudden decision to go with plug doors, thats the norm for all future trains?

But I still prefer the Tung Chung Line and AEL trains better. Alstom designs SUPER SLEEK TRAINS!

I hate the Light Rail trains though, even the new ones, they look like Lego trains.
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Old October 26th, 2004, 06:40 AM   #360
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
Why do plug doors sound quieter? Why should they? I saw a video of the new greyer trains with the plug doors, very nice, like a spaceship! Why the sudden decision to go with plug doors, thats the norm for all future trains?

But I still prefer the Tung Chung Line and AEL trains better. Alstom designs SUPER SLEEK TRAINS!

I hate the Light Rail trains though, even the new ones, they look like Lego trains.
AEL and Tung Chung line are not Alstom design.
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