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Old August 8th, 2004, 07:50 PM   #21
rayman
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where is those motion video advertising inside the subway cab??
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Old August 8th, 2004, 10:25 PM   #22
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Hong Kong schools teach the British standard of English. Some senior government officials today even speak English with a British accent, and their kids get an allowance to study in the UK.

Some subtle differences from (British / American)
- queue up / line up
- lorry / truck
- alight / get off
- chop / stamp (the marking you make for an endorsement)

Motion Advertising
There are screens inside the train that show the name of the next stop. However, the MTR doesn't have televisions on board as I recall. I know the KCR has them :
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Old August 9th, 2004, 12:39 AM   #23
ailiton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
The english announcements have a rather strong Hong Kong accent though. But it just adds to the distinct character of the MTR.
Actually, she has a very beautiful and accurate British accent. Notice how she pronounces the "o" in "open".

Also notice how she pronounces "Admiralty" (a station name) the British way.

Next station: Admiralty. Interchange station for the Tsuen Wan Line.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 01:38 AM   #24
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The longest announcement on Vancouver's Skytrain:

"The next station is Waterfront. Terminus station."


MTR's announcements used to be longer but they have been shortened and simplified twice in the last 6 years. The current set of announcements is the third generation. (that lovely lady's voice was used in all 3 generations)

Example of how they shortened the announcements:

1st gen 1995-1998(Cantonese + English):

The next station is Mong Kok. Passengers for stations from Jordan to Central and all stations on the Island Line, please proceed to the opposite platform number 2.

2nd gen 1998-2003(Cantonese + English):

Next station: Mong Kok. Please Change to platform 2 for the Tsuen Wan Line towards Central.

3rd gen 2003-?(Cantonese + Madarin + English):

Next station: Mong Kok. Interchange station for the Tsuen Wan Line towards Central.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 05:20 AM   #25
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I like the 2nd generation the most. 1st is too long, and 3rd is too short.
But..... for the same amount of time, you need to repeat the same announcements 3 times in 3 different spoken languages; you can't really do anything except shortening the announcements as short as possible.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 05:53 AM   #26
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Gareth: Good point. Maybe I am just too used to the American accent in the way words are pronounced. Keeping the fact that a British accent rather than an American accent is used in the pronounciation of words in the MTR's announcements, everything sounds way okay now. BUT, I still have to insist that there is a slight Hong Kong accent evident in the announcements, though not as evident as I had thought of earlier. The British accent in them is still more than the Hong Kong accent.

On the other hand, I noticed that announcements on the KCR are done by another lady. And that lady sounds perfectly British I would say so I can detect no Hong Kong accent in her pronounciation of words.

Both ladies have excellent voices and well ''hot'' voices I might say. Could just imagine how they would look like in person based on their voices. haha.

Singapore has those LCD Screens in its newer trains on the older North South Line & East West Line. These display next station name, end of line station names and advertisements. On the newest North East Line however, there are LCD Screens in all the trains. These display platform and train safety videos, inspirational quotes, advertisements, next station name, end of line station name and perhaps even more that I didn't take notice of.

The difference between those LCD Screens on the KCR and Singapore's MRT is that while those on the KCR are placed with the screens facing the width of the train, the ones in Singapore are parallel to the seats (facing the length of the train car). Those facing the width of the train car in Singapore's MRT are LED Panels, which display date, time, next station name and current station name.

There are Plasma Screens for each platform too (2 per platform for the newest line and 1 per platform for the older lines). They display train arrival times, direction of travel, end station name, safety messages and advertisements.

By the way, what's the difference between the KCR and the MTR other than them being 2 different companies. Is it that the KCR serves the outlying areas whereas the MTR serves the highly built up areas?

And what do you refer to the MTR/KCR train services as a whole. Do you call them the subway or something? I noticed people refer to the train system by the company running the line concerned rather than using a general term.

Hong Kong should have an integrated transport map like Singapore though. For quite a number of years I didn't even know that there was KCR and Light Rail. I thought MTR was everything. The MTR map only shows MTR Lines.
Singapore's MRT/LRT map is found at this address. This is a slightly different map for it shows also lines under construction, usually it doesn't.
Click Here
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:02 AM   #27
ailiton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
On the other hand, I noticed that announcements on the KCR are done by another lady. And that lady sounds perfectly British I would say so I can detect no Hong Kong accent in her pronounciation of words.
No. Both KCR East + West Rails uses American English in their announcements.
Notice how "form" in "platform" is pronounced. The American pronounce the "r" differently.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:04 AM   #28
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I just love the way Hong Kong does stuff, especially in the field of rail transportation.

It was the first in Asia I think, to implement the contactless smart card system? (I got a shock when I heard that South Korea has such a system in place since the early 1990s, is it true?)

And the Octopus Card is really useful. It can be used for so many non transit related purposes. (The ezlink Card has been in use in Singapore since 2002 but its use beyond public transportation is still very limited. I like how the Octopus Card has a membership system that rewards you for using it.)

And I think it was the first in Asia or even the world to have televisions on board its buses? (Singapore claims that title as well. But technically I think Hong Kong is first for having a television on board. Singapore is first for having LIVE Digital Televisions on board).

And there are automated announcements on buses? WHAT A SHOCK! Didn't know they could do that.

And trains at interchanges wait for each other right. Nice touch. Think they have this box or some panel that tells the driver to wait if there is another train arriving at the opposite platform.

But I heard complaints that public transportation in Hong Kong is just way to expensive. Like how they might be deciding to switch from some method of charging passengers to using a distance based system instead.

Its fun comparing the MTR, KCR and the MRT. The systems are quite similar so its easy to compare and yet distinctly different. In being different, I can just see what I am missing out on.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:08 AM   #29
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ailiton: You get what I mean. The main point is that KCR announcements don't contain any Hong Kong accent in them. And, I don't really take the time to bother between what is British and American. It is only when there is a conflict between the two then I realize ''Oh, that sounds different''.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:09 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
I just love the way Hong Kong does stuff, especially in the field of rail transportation.

It was the first in Asia I think, to implement the contactless smart card system? (I got a shock when I heard that South Korea has such a system in place since the early 1990s, is it true?)

And the Octopus Card is really useful. It can be used for so many non transit related purposes. (The ezlink Card has been in use in Singapore since 2002 but its use beyond public transportation is still very limited. I like how the Octopus Card has a membership system that rewards you for using it.)

And I think it was the first in Asia or even the world to have televisions on board its buses? (Singapore claims that title as well. But technically I think Hong Kong is first for having a television on board. Singapore is first for having LIVE Digital Televisions on board).

And there are automated announcements on buses? WHAT A SHOCK! Didn't know they could do that.

And trains at interchanges wait for each other right. Nice touch. Think they have this box or some panel that tells the driver to wait if there is another train arriving at the opposite platform.

But I heard complaints that public transportation in Hong Kong is just way to expensive. Like how they might be deciding to switch from some method of charging passengers to using a distance based system instead.

Its fun comparing the MTR, KCR and the MRT. The systems are quite similar so its easy to compare and yet distinctly different. In being different, I can just see what I am missing out on.

I was in Korea last month and I don't think they have the smart card system.
I believe HK is the first to implement the smart card system (1997).

Where did you find out those info about MTR?

And yes, I think MTR is very similar to MRT. They are two of the very best in the world (in terms of quality).
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:15 AM   #31
ailiton
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I've seen the MTR lady. She is very pretty indeed!

Her English really doesn't contain any HK accent. I know both the British and American accents quite well and I can say that her English is more British than a typical British's.

Which words do you think are containing HK accent?

Personally, I hate the East Rail announcements coz that lady (English) has a low voice.

Subway = MTR

I'll leave the bus thing to hkskyline.

Last edited by ailiton; August 9th, 2004 at 08:10 AM.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:20 AM   #32
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ailiton: Really? I distinctly remember watching a South Korean television drama episode where the actor, who has no money, pretends to tap his wallet on the reader but is found out by the bus driver that he has no contactless smart card on him. I think you could really try to search on the internet for information on South Korea's smart card system. I think it's a really old system so I guess Hong Kong is technically first in terms of implementing an all new smart card system? All this are guesses. I don't know. haha.

What info on the MTR are you referring to. I get most of my info from friends and the good old World Wide Web.

So far, my impression of the Hong Kong MTR has been great. Being in operation since 1979, they have a lot of experience in everything.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:24 AM   #33
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Oh never mind let's just forget that accent issue thingy. Maybe its just me... haha.

Sometimes they don't use prerecorded announcements so the announcements are by the drivers. They DEFINITELY HAVE THAT HONG KONG ACCENT. And sometimes they rush through the words and mispronounce.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:26 AM   #34
ailiton
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Are you talking about Seoul's system? Their fare gates only take paper tickets. And their system look surprisingly Japanese.

How is the transfering procedure done in MRT? (never been there before)

Where are the plasmas on the platforms placed?
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:27 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
Oh never mind let's just forget that accent issue thingy. Maybe its just me... haha.

Sometimes they don't use prerecorded announcements so the announcements are by the drivers. They DEFINITELY HAVE THAT HONG KONG ACCENT. And sometimes they rush through the words and mispronounce.
Yes. The drivers' English suck. Some of them don't even know the English names of stations (like Prince Edward and Admiralty).
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:32 AM   #36
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Weird. When I was listening to the MTR recordings last night, I could distinctly remember hearing a Hong Kong accent in them. Then again, it could just be me being too overly critical. After all, yesterday was the first time I heard these announcements and I guess I found them weird as I was expecting something different. Never mind. They sound British to me now. hehe. Weird.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:36 AM   #37
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What transferring procedure?
There is an actual procedure involved when transferring? Singapore MRT & LRT Lines are run by two companies, that being ''SBS Transit'' and ''SMRT'', with SBS Transit running the newest fully automated driverless subway line. When transferring between the North East Line (SBS Transit) and the North South Line (SMRT) at the Dhoby Ghaut Interchange Station, I just transfer. No tapping of contactless smart card involved. Because its an old station integrating with a new station, there is a long walk involved (There's a travellator though) BUT other than that you just walk to your other line within the paid premises in the underground station.
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:43 AM   #38
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How about City Hall and Raffles Place?

Where can I find new photos of the MRT?
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:43 AM   #39
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The Plasma Screens are located where your LED Screens in Hong Kong are. Its just that on the newer lines, somehow the company is richer as to provide for two Plasma screens on Each Platform, so passengers can always see what's on the screens at both ends of the platform. They are spread out evenly and nicely.

But on the older lines, only 1 per platform is provided. Weird. Though in some stations the screen are in the middle of the platform and you can see the screens fairly clearly, in some stations the screens are too far to the left or to the right. The passenger who is furtherest from the screen can't see much at all.
An illustration:
==== denotes the platform.
P denotes the Plasma Screen.

============================P======================== (Some stations)

==============P=====================================
(Some weird stations)

On the newest line however.
=================P====================P==============
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Old August 9th, 2004, 06:47 AM   #40
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At City Hall & Raffles Place Stations, you just have to cross the platform because the lines were meant to integrate right from the start as they were constructed together. At Dhoby Ghaut, the North East Line was a new line and as such as to be fitted weirdly into the existing station.

Government Website: LTA
Company Website: SBS Transit
SMRT
Subway Fan's Website: UrbanRail (The information is a little inaccurate)
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