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Old October 30th, 2004, 11:33 AM   #401
huaiwei
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Yeap..finally some facts there.

Btw, it was interesting to note that the underground NEL do have pantographs, which I only came to realise months after the service started when I stared down at the tracks and saw no third rail, and then looked up!
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Old October 30th, 2004, 06:05 PM   #402
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I hardly hear any buzz about Hong Kong's public transit systems comparing with Singapore or even other regional cities. I hear a lot more about Hong Kong transit companies expanding into the mainland, running services and providing consultancy work.

From Monday, there's no more taking MTR for a ride; $10 surcharge imposed to plug loophole that allowed dodging of fares

Cheung Chi-fai and Martin Wong
30 October 2004
South China Morning Post

The MTR Corporation was slammed yesterday after it said it would impose a $10 penalty surcharge on passengers who enter and exit its system from the same station more than 20 minutes after passing through the turnstile.

The MTRC said it wanted to plug a loophole that allowed fare abuse. But Legislative Council panel chairman Lau Kong-wah said he did not see any evidence of widespread abuse and urged the rail operator to postpone the measure.

And non-aligned legislator Albert Chan Wai-yip said the corporation, which has the autonomy to change its fares and by-laws, was like a "super-kingdom that can do whatever it likes".

At present, passengers who enter and leave by the same station pay only the minimum fare of $3.80. From Monday they will pay a flat $10 - including the minimum fare - if they take more than 20 minutes.

Passengers who remain on the system for 90 minutes or more will continue to pay the maximum $26 fare no matter where they enter or exit.

The corporation did not say who the measure was aimed at, but it will particularly hit courier firms, which can deliver a parcel from one end of the network to the other by handing it over the barrier to a colleague and pay just the minimum fare. Long joyrides on the system also will no longer be possible.

At an average two minutes between stations, the 20-minute deadline will allow a journey of only four or five stations there and back - Central to Causeway Bay or Tsim Sha Tsui to Mongkok.

MTRC spokeswoman Catherine Sing said the surcharge was aimed at protecting the interests of all passengers by ensuring everyone who used the MTR train service paid the appropriate fare.

She said some passengers had complained that it was unfair that some passengers paid the minimum fee but travelled a long way within the network. "We are only striving to protect the passengers who genuinely pay the required fare for the journey travelled," Ms Sing said.

Head of operations Wilfred Lau Cheuk-man said they did not want passengers who paid the proper fare to subsidise those who might be taking advantage of the system's design.

The change was announced, just three days before it takes effect, in a press statement and notices posted at stations.

A spokesman for the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau said the MTRC had fare autonomy. "It has the right to change its fares according to the business environment," he said.

Legislator Mr Chan said the surcharge would not make a significant difference to the MTR's revenue but would put extra pressure on passengers. He said the government should strengthen its control over the railway.

Mr Lau said he believed couriers would be most affected. "Their livelihoods will be seriously affected," he said.

The MTRC said it was willing to listen to public opinion.
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Old October 30th, 2004, 06:55 PM   #403
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sher
you can interchange for mtr at TST East station????
Wow, that would be nice! I didn't know that, hope its walking distance are not as far as the Central-HK mtr.
It's about the same distance IMO...
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Old October 30th, 2004, 07:15 PM   #404
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huaiwei
Yeap..finally some facts there.

Btw, it was interesting to note that the underground NEL do have pantographs, which I only came to realise months after the service started when I stared down at the tracks and saw no third rail, and then looked up!
Anyone knows how does the third rail look like? I cant differentiate it from the normal rails.
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Old October 30th, 2004, 07:32 PM   #405
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
Anyone knows how does the third rail look like? I cant differentiate it from the normal rails.
Er....have you seen the NEL tracks before? If you compare the two, it should be very obvious.
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Old October 30th, 2004, 07:34 PM   #406
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
I hardly hear any buzz about Hong Kong's public transit systems comparing with Singapore or even other regional cities. I hear a lot more about Hong Kong transit companies expanding into the mainland, running services and providing consultancy work.

From Monday, there's no more taking MTR for a ride; $10 surcharge imposed to plug loophole that allowed dodging of fares

Cheung Chi-fai and Martin Wong
30 October 2004
South China Morning Post

The MTR Corporation was slammed yesterday after it said it would impose a $10 penalty surcharge on passengers who enter and exit its system from the same station more than 20 minutes after passing through the turnstile.

The MTRC said it wanted to plug a loophole that allowed fare abuse. But Legislative Council panel chairman Lau Kong-wah said he did not see any evidence of widespread abuse and urged the rail operator to postpone the measure.

And non-aligned legislator Albert Chan Wai-yip said the corporation, which has the autonomy to change its fares and by-laws, was like a "super-kingdom that can do whatever it likes".

At present, passengers who enter and leave by the same station pay only the minimum fare of $3.80. From Monday they will pay a flat $10 - including the minimum fare - if they take more than 20 minutes.

Passengers who remain on the system for 90 minutes or more will continue to pay the maximum $26 fare no matter where they enter or exit.

The corporation did not say who the measure was aimed at, but it will particularly hit courier firms, which can deliver a parcel from one end of the network to the other by handing it over the barrier to a colleague and pay just the minimum fare. Long joyrides on the system also will no longer be possible.

At an average two minutes between stations, the 20-minute deadline will allow a journey of only four or five stations there and back - Central to Causeway Bay or Tsim Sha Tsui to Mongkok.

MTRC spokeswoman Catherine Sing said the surcharge was aimed at protecting the interests of all passengers by ensuring everyone who used the MTR train service paid the appropriate fare.

She said some passengers had complained that it was unfair that some passengers paid the minimum fee but travelled a long way within the network. "We are only striving to protect the passengers who genuinely pay the required fare for the journey travelled," Ms Sing said.

Head of operations Wilfred Lau Cheuk-man said they did not want passengers who paid the proper fare to subsidise those who might be taking advantage of the system's design.

The change was announced, just three days before it takes effect, in a press statement and notices posted at stations.

A spokesman for the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau said the MTRC had fare autonomy. "It has the right to change its fares according to the business environment," he said.

Legislator Mr Chan said the surcharge would not make a significant difference to the MTR's revenue but would put extra pressure on passengers. He said the government should strengthen its control over the railway.

Mr Lau said he believed couriers would be most affected. "Their livelihoods will be seriously affected," he said.

The MTRC said it was willing to listen to public opinion.
Yup there's not much of a comparision between the modes of transport in HK and Singapore. There's some comparison between the MTR and the MRT though, but such comparisons are made by tourists who find that the design and colour schemes of both systems similar.

By the way where did MTR look to when planning for its rail system back then in the early 1970s? Britain?

Looks like the MTR is really making full use of Hong Kong's SAR status. Shanghai, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, any more?
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Old October 30th, 2004, 07:36 PM   #407
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huaiwei
Er....have you seen the NEL tracks before? If you compare the two, it should be very obvious.
Its just basically two rails right...except on above ground stretches as with anywhere else its 4 strips of rail.
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Old October 30th, 2004, 10:05 PM   #408
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MTR has been doing a lot of consulting work outside China as well. The company has been trying to bid for some projects in England and has worked on projects for Manila, Seoul, Bangkok, and scores of othercities. It is working with the Dutch to implement smart cards there as well.

More information on consultancy projects in the past 5 years :
http://www.mtr.com.hk/eng/consultant/consultant1.html

More information from the latest interim report :
http://www.mtr.com.hk/eng/investors/...m2004/F106.pdf
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Old October 31st, 2004, 07:54 PM   #409
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Rail delays signal a mystery
Colum Murphy, Hong Kong Standard
November 1, 2004


Hong Kong's rail companies have been plagued by an unprecedented number of service failures. Since July there have been more than 80 incidents, divided almost evenly between the two companies.

The main cause of the incidents is signalling-related problems.

Both MTRC and KCRC have gone to great lengths to defend their maintenance and safety practices, saying their billion-dollar maintenance budgets and staffing levels are more than adequate to ensure proper upkeep. They also dismiss the suggestion that preparations for the proposed merger could have distracted management teams from core activities.

If this is so, what then explains the sharp increase in incidents, in particular those caused by signalling hardware failures?

Rail experts stress that none of the recent incidents constituted a threat to public safety. But even they can't pinpoint a reason, leaving them to suggest that it might just be a string of bad luck.

However, with two distinct rail entities being affected simultaneously, it seems unlikely that the reason is chance alone.

Yet some answers will need to be found, not only to allay passenger fears, but also to bolster the credibility of both companies at a time when Sarah Liao, Secretary for the Department of Environment, Transport and Works, and her team are reviewing their merger proposal.

Signalling aims to prevent collisions and derailments while allowing trains to travel at appropriate speeds. Signalling information, which can be visual, audible or both, should also be failsafe, meaning that if components fail there should be a backup to ensure full function.

Since July, the MTR has experienced 45 incidents, or almost three a week, with the majority of them resulting in delays to passengers of eight minutes or more. Signalling-related problems, including hardware failure, accounted for one third. Meanwhile, rolling-stock related factors such as doors or wheels not functioning properly accounted for 30 per cent of cases, power supply 13 per cent, computing and control problems 7 per cent. The remaining incidents were disruptions arising from passenger negligence.

A similar trend has emerged for KCRC, which experienced more than 40 incidents in the same period, with signalling-related problems accounting for more than 60 per cent.

Mark Ho, associate professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University's department of electrical engineering, said it was not surprising that signalling emerged as the main suspect.

"One has to understand that it's one of the most delicate systems in railways. If anything goes wrong, it only fails on the safe side," he explained.

Ho said it was this kind of critical redundancy, or "over-cautiousness", that accounted for the extremely low accident rate and number of casualties on Hong Kong's railways.

Because of their tendency to directly impact on the provision of service, signalling failures tend to be the most conspicuous type of incident - though by no means the only type. "I am sure they've similar fault rates in other areas, but nobody knows because they don't [rise to] the surface."

Despite this, Ho remained confident that Hong Kong's trains were among the safest in the world and saw little cause for public concern. "There are a lot of features in there to double safeguard, even triple safeguard, safety. Every component has its life cycle."

According to Catherine Sing, spokeswoman for MTRC, two companies, Siemens and Alstom, provided all of the signalling equipment installed both alongside the track and on board trains. Sing stressed that after taking delivery, the MTRC was fully responsible for maintenance of the system.

Karen Kwong, spokeswoman for Siemens Hong Kong said: "The current train incidents are not related to Siemens signalling or any other Siemens systems."

Siemens arrived at this conclusion following internal discussions, she said.

Alstom was not immediately available for comment.

Jeff Leung, spokesman for KCRC, said Alcatel Canada was the supplier of signalling equipment on the KCRC Westrail, which has been plagued by technical glitches since its opening last December.

MTRC and KCRC insist that the recent spate of incidents is not caused by reduction in spending on maintenance, nor to increased outsourcing.

Yet Chan Sing-wo, chairman of MTR railway staff union, is not fully convinced.

"[The contractors] have less manpower. Because there's less manpower, it could be that the [maintenance] check is not sufficient," Chan said.

To get to the root of the problem MTRC has appointed Lloyd's Register Rail, to conduct an "independent and comprehensive review of its service performance, the condition of its service critical assets and its asset management practices". Michael Hamlyn, president of Lloyd's Register Rail Asia, said he could not comment on the details of the study until his firm completed its analysis and review, which is expected next January.
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Old October 31st, 2004, 07:56 PM   #410
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Rail delays signal a mystery
Colum Murphy, Hong Kong Standard
November 1, 2004

Hong Kong's rail companies have been plagued by an unprecedented number of service failures. Since July there have been more than 80 incidents, divided almost evenly between the two companies.

The main cause of the incidents is signalling-related problems.

Both MTRC and KCRC have gone to great lengths to defend their maintenance and safety practices, saying their billion-dollar maintenance budgets and staffing levels are more than adequate to ensure proper upkeep. They also dismiss the suggestion that preparations for the proposed merger could have distracted management teams from core activities.

If this is so, what then explains the sharp increase in incidents, in particular those caused by signalling hardware failures?

Rail experts stress that none of the recent incidents constituted a threat to public safety. But even they can't pinpoint a reason, leaving them to suggest that it might just be a string of bad luck.

However, with two distinct rail entities being affected simultaneously, it seems unlikely that the reason is chance alone.

Yet some answers will need to be found, not only to allay passenger fears, but also to bolster the credibility of both companies at a time when Sarah Liao, Secretary for the Department of Environment, Transport and Works, and her team are reviewing their merger proposal.

Signalling aims to prevent collisions and derailments while allowing trains to travel at appropriate speeds. Signalling information, which can be visual, audible or both, should also be failsafe, meaning that if components fail there should be a backup to ensure full function.

Since July, the MTR has experienced 45 incidents, or almost three a week, with the majority of them resulting in delays to passengers of eight minutes or more. Signalling-related problems, including hardware failure, accounted for one third. Meanwhile, rolling-stock related factors such as doors or wheels not functioning properly accounted for 30 per cent of cases, power supply 13 per cent, computing and control problems 7 per cent. The remaining incidents were disruptions arising from passenger negligence.

A similar trend has emerged for KCRC, which experienced more than 40 incidents in the same period, with signalling-related problems accounting for more than 60 per cent.

Mark Ho, associate professor at Hong Kong Polytechnic University's department of electrical engineering, said it was not surprising that signalling emerged as the main suspect.

"One has to understand that it's one of the most delicate systems in railways. If anything goes wrong, it only fails on the safe side," he explained.

Ho said it was this kind of critical redundancy, or "over-cautiousness", that accounted for the extremely low accident rate and number of casualties on Hong Kong's railways.

Because of their tendency to directly impact on the provision of service, signalling failures tend to be the most conspicuous type of incident - though by no means the only type. "I am sure they've similar fault rates in other areas, but nobody knows because they don't [rise to] the surface."

Despite this, Ho remained confident that Hong Kong's trains were among the safest in the world and saw little cause for public concern. "There are a lot of features in there to double safeguard, even triple safeguard, safety. Every component has its life cycle."

According to Catherine Sing, spokeswoman for MTRC, two companies, Siemens and Alstom, provided all of the signalling equipment installed both alongside the track and on board trains. Sing stressed that after taking delivery, the MTRC was fully responsible for maintenance of the system.

Karen Kwong, spokeswoman for Siemens Hong Kong said: "The current train incidents are not related to Siemens signalling or any other Siemens systems."

Siemens arrived at this conclusion following internal discussions, she said.

Alstom was not immediately available for comment.

Jeff Leung, spokesman for KCRC, said Alcatel Canada was the supplier of signalling equipment on the KCRC Westrail, which has been plagued by technical glitches since its opening last December.

MTRC and KCRC insist that the recent spate of incidents is not caused by reduction in spending on maintenance, nor to increased outsourcing.

Yet Chan Sing-wo, chairman of MTR railway staff union, is not fully convinced.

"[The contractors] have less manpower. Because there's less manpower, it could be that the [maintenance] check is not sufficient," Chan said.

To get to the root of the problem MTRC has appointed Lloyd's Register Rail, to conduct an "independent and comprehensive review of its service performance, the condition of its service critical assets and its asset management practices". Michael Hamlyn, president of Lloyd's Register Rail Asia, said he could not comment on the details of the study until his firm completed its analysis and review, which is expected next January.
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Old November 1st, 2004, 05:47 PM   #411
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In Cantonese, Mandarin, and English :

The Train is Approaching. Please stand back from the platform screen doors.
http://www.ilovemove.com/fai/kcrer/s...pproaching.wma

Lo Wu is the final stop. The train will be departing shortly. Please mind the platform gap.
http://www.ilovemove.com/fai/kcrer/s...nIsForLoWu.wma

The next train to Lo Wu will depart from platform 2.
http://www.ilovemove.com/fai/kcrer/s...tPlatform2.wma

Please stand back from the platform screen doors.
http://www.ilovemove.com/fai/kcrer/s...FromThePSD.wma
http://www.ilovemove.com/fai/kcrer/s...outToLeave.wma
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Old November 3rd, 2004, 04:54 AM   #412
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October 31, 2004
Helicopters, mules aid cable car construction

Getting 12,000 tons of materials up into Lantau North Country Park to construct one of the world's largest cable car systems is certainly a big challenge with no easy solution, especially when temporary haul roads and ropeways cannot be used to environmental preservation.

The Tung Chung Cable Car will marry modern and traditional methods, transporting materials and equipment by helicopter and mule.

Helicopters are used to move people and equipment into remote areas. The helicopters fly seven to eight hours a day lifting materials and equipment either from Tung Chung or Ngong Ping to the five remote tower locations and an angle station in the park. They lift big heavy items like piling rigs, air compressors, scaffolding and concrete.

While helicopters are fast and efficient, they are also susceptible to weather conditions. When the visibility is poor, or the wind speed and direction not favourable, then the aircraft can be grounded.







Perfect mix: The construction of the Tung Chung Cable Car marries modern and traditional methods of transporting materials and equipment by using helicopters and mules.

Mules rule

Mules, while slow and unable to carry huge loads, work effectively in almost any weather. They carry fuel, water, sand and aggregate, cement or grout, and small tools and equipment. They also bring out of the park excavated materials and general rubbish.

Over 14 months, the helicopters are scheduled to move around 10,000 tons of materials, plants and equipment, with an additional 2,000 tons by mule.

Helicopter Project Manager Grant Hislop told news.gov.hk that his responsibilities first and foremost are to ensure the helicopters can run safely in this construction environment.

While it is obvious that when visibility is poor the helicopters cannot operate, it is not so obvious to the construction staff how wind affects the helicopter's performance. Winds in the area can often be some of the strongest in Hong Kong.

Wind flows around the terrain the same way water in a river flows around rocks and boulders. In flying, pilots call the strong winds associated with mountains "mechanical turbulence".

Placing loads with care, precision

Mr Hislop said: "Most of the towers on the cable car route are located on the steep slopes of the valley and this requires the helicopters to work often in the areas where we will experience the greatest mechanical turbulence.

"The nature of helicopter lifting work requires the pilots to place heavy loads up to 1,000kgs into place with precision, keeping in mind that there are men working on the ground whose safety is dependent upon the pilot placing the loads with care and precision.

"Prior to working with the helicopter all of the construction workers on the project will attend a training day at our Heliservices base. This training emphasises how to work around the helicopter safely and how to properly rig the numerous different types of loads that will be lifted."

Mr Hislop has spent the majority of his career flying helicopters in Canada. The work there was much diversified and included exploration, fire fighting, search and rescue, television and motion picture aerial filming, and aerial construction.

Exciting, fantastic experience

He is very pleased to be part of this exciting project.

"What better office could you ask for? Almost everyday I fly to the top of Lantau Island and have a bird's eye view of the aircraft landing and taking off from Chek Lap Kok and on the clear days can see all the way to Macau. The project staff that I work with daily from Maeda Corporation, the main contractor of the project, are incredibly professional and their enthusiasm for the project makes working there a pleasure," Mr Hislop said.

"Lifting work with helicopters is one of my favourite aspects of my job. The rewards are very tangible. Upon the completion of the project you are able to look back at the physical structure and feel the pride associated with being an important part of the construction process. This pride is even greater when you are working on a project such as the Tung Chung Cable Car.

"This fantastic route up to the Big Buddha will give Hong Kong people and visitors from around the world, a bird's eye view of the natural beauty of this wonderful place."

Developed by the MTR Corporation, the 5.7km-long Tung Chung Cable Car project will be a unique and brand new tourism experience for local and overseas visitors. Upon opening in early 2006, the 20-minute journey will give visitors great views along the way before arriving at Ngong Ping.
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Old November 4th, 2004, 12:31 AM   #413
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20 MTR stations retrofitted with platform screen doors
Wednesday, November 3, 2004
Government Press Release

Following is a question by the Hon Albert Chan and a written reply by the Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works, Dr Sarah Liao, at the Legislative Council meeting today (November 3):

Question:

It has been reported that the number of accidents involving passengers falling onto the rail track has reduced markedly since the retrofitting of screen doors at MTR stations by the MTR Corporation Limited (MTRCL). In this connection, will the Government inform this Council whether it knows:

(a) the number of accidents involving MTR passengers falling onto the rail track and the casualties involved in the past year;

(b) the respective numbers and names of the stations where screen doors have been and have not yet been retrofitted;

(c) whether MTRCL has formulated a detailed retrofitting plan for the stations where screen doors have not yet been retrofitted; if so, of the details; if not, the reasons for that; and

(d) whether the reasons stated in (c) include technical problems; if so, whether the authorities have assessed if such technical problems are real; if assessment has been made, of the results, as well as the measures in place to ensure that MTRCL can retrofit screen doors at all stations?

Reply:

Madam President,

The number of accidents involving MTR passengers falling onto the rail track and the casualties involved in the past year are summarized below:

2004 (Up to 30 September 2004)

Causes Death Injury Unhurt
Trespassing onto Track 0 0 7
Suicide 3 0 0
Attempted Suicide 0 2 1
Falling from Platform 0 7 4
Accidentally Total 3 9 12 24

For the station platforms along the Airport Express Line, Tseung Kwan O Line and Tung Chung Line, platform screen doors had been installed during the construction stage. As regards the other railway lines, MTRCL launched the "MTR Platform Screen Door Retrofit Programme" in 1999 with a view to providing passengers with a more comfortable travelling environment and reducing energy consumption. The project covers 30 underground stations on the Kwun Tong, Tsuen Wan and Island Lines and is expected to complete by 2006.

At present, platform screen doors have been retrofitted at the following 20 stations:

Island Line
1. Sheung Wan
2. Central
3. Admiralty
4. Wan Chai
5. Causeway Bay
6. North Point

Tsuen Wan Line
7. Tsim Sha Tsui
8. Jordan
9. Yau Ma Tei
10. Mong Kok
11. Prince Edward
12. Sham Shui Po
13. Cheung Sha Wan
14. Lai Chi Kok
15. Mei Foo
16. Tai Wo Hau

Kwun Tong Line
17. Shek Kip Mei
18. Kowloon Tong
19. Lok Fu
20. Wong Tai Sin

Platform screen doors will be retrofitted at the following 10 stations by 2006 :
1. Tin Hau
2. Tai Koo
3. Sai Wan Ho
4. Diamond Hill
5. Lam Tin
6. Fortress Hill
7. Quarry Bay
8. Shau Kei Wan
9. Choi Hung
10. Lai King

For the remaining eight at-grade/overhead stations (Tseun Wan, Kwai Hing, Kwai Fong, Ngau Tau Kok, Kowloon Bay, Kwun Tong, Heng Fa Chuen and Chai Wan), retrofitting of platform screen doors involves major alterations to the stations and tunnel ventilation, air-conditioning and smoke extract systems. Since such at-grade/overhead stations are not designed with air-conditioning and ventilation systems, retrofitting works are subject to technical constraints.

MTR Corporation Limited is fully engaged in retrofitting platform screen doors at all underground stations. Upon their completion, the Corporation will consider retrofitting platform screen doors at the remaining stations.
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Old November 4th, 2004, 12:49 AM   #414
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New KCRC East Rail stock from Japan
On the afternoon of March 22, 2001. The first batch of new KCRC East Rail rolling stocks built by Itochu-Kinki-Kawasaki Consortium arrived Hung Hom Station Pier. Member Mr Ken Lau captured the moment of arrival.

























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Old November 4th, 2004, 03:32 AM   #415
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Service Vehicles by HY4099 from a Hong Kong transport forum :



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Old November 4th, 2004, 07:39 AM   #416
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Copyright 2004 South China Morning Post Ltd.
November 3, 2004

Thousands affected by MTR glitches
Benjamin Wong

The MTR suffered three mechanical problems yesterday, with two occurring during rush hour last night and affecting thousands of passengers.

A company spokeswoman said last night: "Though train services have achieved 99.9 per cent punctuality, as we're running 3,000 trains a day there could still be one or two such problems daily."

She apologised to the public on behalf of the company.

The two rush-hour incidents last night struck within minutes of each other. The first occurred at 6.40pm at the Kwun Tong line's Lam Tin station, forcing trains towards Yau Ma Tei to slow down.

Five minutes later, on the Tsuen Wan line towards Central, about 1,000 passengers were forced to get off a train at Jordan because its doors failed to shut properly.

Earlier, the doors of the Airport Express failed to close as it was about to leave the Kowloon station about 7.30am.
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Old November 4th, 2004, 08:28 AM   #417
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Old November 4th, 2004, 08:42 AM   #418
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Woah North South Line & East West Line, sounds so much like Singapore. haha... Its about time they intend to change the names of the lines. East Rail & West Rail sounds so unsubway like and makes it seem like they are independent networks...

They mis-spelled Interchange for the APM.

What are APMs? Similar to the LRTs in Singapore? Or like KCR Light Rail?
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Old November 4th, 2004, 09:04 AM   #419
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Not sure if they are really going to call them North-South Line and East-West Line. In English, North-South sounds better but in Chinese, South-North sounds better.

I think the APMs will be similar to those in HKIA.
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Old November 4th, 2004, 09:08 AM   #420
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ailiton
Not sure if they are really going to call them North-South Line and East-West Line. In English, North-South sounds better but in Chinese, South-North sounds better.

I think the APMs will be similar to those in HKIA.
That means they will be quite similar to the one on the Bukit Panjang LRT Line in Singapore.

Will they be elevated? Any pics on how HKIA's APM looks like?

Until now I still don't know what is North South East West In Chinese.

I know 东南西北 but I dont know which is which...haha...
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