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Old November 4th, 2004, 02:58 PM   #421
xePh3roK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
[...]
I know 东南西北 but I dont know which is which...haha...
東 East
南 South
西 West
北 North
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Old November 5th, 2004, 03:02 AM   #422
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Interesting Sight @ Tai Po Market Station
Photos from a Hong Kong transport forum :



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Old November 5th, 2004, 04:06 AM   #423
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Where is this Hong Kong transport forum?

Was the train delayed or something?
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Old November 5th, 2004, 05:35 AM   #424
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There are two sets of platforms at Tai Po Market station. Only one set is used regularly. The photos seem to show the second disused set.

There are several HK transport forums out there, so I usually refer to them with one blanket term. If you want to know the web addresses you can PM me and we'll discuss.
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Old November 5th, 2004, 08:55 AM   #425
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Wow, Hong Kong's railways have been getting their share of glitches.
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Old November 5th, 2004, 08:28 PM   #426
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There's a media frenzy right now over the MTR and the KCR. Some of the glitches only last for a few minutes, but they seem to be reported to be as severe as the longer service disruptions. Notice the November 3rd SCMP article called the glitches mechanical problems but they're actually quite minor - doors not closing properly, trains slowing down, etc.
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Old November 8th, 2004, 08:54 AM   #427
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It's Goodbye Kitty amid an escalating crime wave
Andy Cheng
7 November 2004
South China Morning Post

Hong Kong's love affair with Hello Kitty has turned criminal - light-fingered fans have stolen stickers of the ubiquitous cat from MTR stations.

Since October 22, people have made off with all 250 Hello Kitty stickers adorning advertising panels beside escalators throughout the subway network.

The hexagonal stickers were all stripped from advertising posters for 7-Eleven convenience stores. 7-Eleven officials said they had not called police about the thefts, but declined to say why.

An MTR spokesman said the decision to report the thefts to police rested with 7-Eleven.

The thieves were no doubt drawn to the stickers' three-dimensional nature. They change appearance when viewed from different angles, like a hologram.

7-Eleven's MTR advertising campaign, which began on October 22, is promoting a Hello Kitty magnet to be given away with every $20 spent by customers at any of its outlets.

The promotion marks Hello Kitty's 30th birthday, which was on Monday.

The chain purchased an advertising package from the MTR Corporation involving about 250 wall panels.

"Within the first week, all of these [stickers] had been ripped off by collectors, which was a huge surprise to us," a 7-Eleven spokeswoman told the Sunday Morning Post.

"These actions, though, confirm just how popular Hello Kitty is in Hong Kong," she added.

An MTRC spokesman said the agreement with 7-Eleven did not compel it to pay compensation for any damage to the panels. He said there had been no similar thefts recently involving other images. He reminded the public that the maximum penalty for vandalising railway premises was a $5,000 fine.

7-Eleven has printed replacement posters - minus the stickers and three-dimensional effects.
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Old November 8th, 2004, 09:08 AM   #428
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Special Tickets & Items

MTR will issue a series of three limited-edition "Doraemon" MTR Souvenir Ticket Sets in three consecutive weeks starting November 21, 2004. Priced at $80, each ticket set includes a souvenir ticket, a ticket holder, and a Doraemon premium, namely Doraemon Recording Music Box for the first set, Doraemon Phone Delight for the second, and Doraemon Recording Alarm Clock for the third. The ticket sets will be available for sale at Customer Service Centres at all MTR stations (except Airport Express) while stock lasts.

Each ticket is valid for two rides to any destination on the MTR (except Airport Express) until February 1, 8 and 15, 2005 respectively. Each person is limited to two sets per purchase.



Crystal Trains

Made of good quality Austrian crystal with over 30% of Pbo, the crystal train sparkles like a colourful rainbow in a world of fantasy.





Stationery Set in Ticket Machine Design
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Old November 8th, 2004, 09:21 AM   #429
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Sept 13, 2003.
The new KCRC East Rail ER20 diesels loco built by siemens arrived Hung Hom freight yard dock.





















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Old November 9th, 2004, 04:22 AM   #430
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Hong Kong's FUTURE is built on rail
James Blake. Railway Gazette International. London:
Oct 2004.

Following a decision in 1998 to make rail the backbone of the region's transport network, work is underway to expand Hong Kong's two railways. James Blake* says further expansion is inevitable, but previously-announced projects are subject to review pending the outcome of talks about merging the two organisations

TAKEN TOGETHER, Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp and Mass Transit Railway Corp already handle around 30% of the 12 million journeys made every day in Hong Kong. This proportion is set to rise further over the next 15 years as the rail network expands.

Following the publication in 1998 of the Hong Kong government's second Railway Development Study, planning has proceeded on the basis that railways will form the backbone of the transport system. In the next 20 years Hong Kong's resident population is forecast to rise from 6-6 million to 8 million, and there is no doubt that it will continue to grow, albeit more slowly. The government envisages that most of the population will live within convenient distance of a station, with the railways providing good interchanges to other forms of transport.

The number of daily passengers on the two rail networks is forecast to rise from around 3.6 million to 5.5 million over the next 1 5 years, equal to about 40% of the daily trip demand. In comparison, franchised buses are currently used for 39% of trips, and the rest are taxi, private car or light bus.

A special feature is the growing demand for cross-boundary travel from Hong Kong residents and the 56 million people in the adjoining Pearl River Delta. The Delta's economic growth is being fuelled by Hong Kong entrepreneurs, and much of Hong Kong's current growth is being driven by the increasing number of tourists from the Mainland.

KCRC accounts for 75% of all cross-boundary trips, but this share is falling and is forecast to settle around 60% as new road crossings open and coach services become more competitive. Forecasts show demand increasing by 8-5% year-on-year over the next few years before slowing to 5%, compared with growth of 15% around 10 years ago.

New routes

In 1998 MTR Corp launched an express rail service from the core business districts of Kowloon and Hong Kong Island to Chek Lap Kok Airport. Competition from transport operators using the new express road link to the airport has limited the growth in rail traffic, but in addition to the fast trains, the railway provides local services to the growing population centres along the route.

MTR Corp opened another 6 km railway on August 18 2002, linking the core urban areas of Hong Kong Island and Kowloon with the eastern end of the harbour and Tseung Kwan O new town (RG 2.02 p93). Fast journey times and competitive fares have enabled this line to attract passengers away from established road services.

On December 20 2003 KCRC opened West Rail, linking the northwest New Territories with Kowloon (RG 5.01 p309). The line was conceived in the 1990s to increase the capacity of rail services with the Mainland and serve the new towns which were being built to accommodate Hong Kong's growing population. A major priority was interchange with buses and other transport modes - of the 30-5 km route's nine stations, four offer interchange with light rail services and two have direct covered transfers to MTR.

West Rail was the largest and most complex project in Hong Kong since the construction of the new airport. The scheme was completed on schedule and well below the budget agreed with government thanks to the use of modern but proven technology and strong client-led project management.

West Rail has proved a great technical success, operating for 18 h each day and running 99-5% of timetabled trips. On average 150 000 passengers a day use West Rail. The trend is increasing, but the total is still less than the number expected for financial viability. This is partly a matter of public acceptance, compounded by economic conditions, express bus competition and slower than anticipated population growth in the areas served.

However West Rail has shown that a 130 km/h commuter railway can be built and operated in compliance with the strictest noise and environmental standards, including a 30 min cumulative train noise limit of 60 dB(A) on sections of the railway at certain times to protect dwellings located as near as 15 m from passing trains. If the operation of the railway does not comply with these statutory limits, operations could be halted until mitigation is in place.

Tsim Sha Tsui

A year after commencing the detailed planning and design for West Rail, in 1998 the government invited KCRC to draw up detailed plans for the three East Rail Extensions. These are an extension of East Rail to Tsim Sha Tsui in the heart of Kowloon's tourist and business sector, a line from Tai Wai to serve the growing population centres beyond Sha Tin new town, and a branch to serve a second border crossing at Lok Ma Chau. As sole shareholder of KCRC, the government will have invested almost US$10bn in West Rail and the East Rail extensions.

From the former terminus at Hung Horn a twin-track tunnel was extended 1 km along the harbour towards Tsim Sha Tsui MTR station, which is reached by pedestrian tunnels with moving walkways to encourage interchange.

Building a major underground station and pedestrian system in the heart of congested Tsim Sha Tsui involved extensive heavy-duty road decking and complicated excavations in confined conditions; the new tunnel passes within 150 mm of the Cross Harbour Road Tunnel. The difficulties were compounded by the proximity of the harbour seawall and sea water intakes for cooling some of Kowloon's most prestigious hotels.

It was also necessary to protect a tree of good fortune, or Champion Tree, standing within the station footprint. This was kept alive in a 30 m diameter concrete pot through careful soil monitoring and automatic watering while work went on around it.

Construction started in 2001, and preoperation services are now running over the route every day. Commercial services are planned to start before the end of this year. Tsim Sha Tsui station can accommodate 12-car trains; it features platform screen doors and airconditioning of all public areas. The station and walkways are finished with resin-bonded terrazzo floor tiles and vitreous enamel wall panelling, with semi-open ceilings providing access to fire, smoke extraction, ventilation, lighting, CCTV, public address and mobile telephone services.

Ma On Shan

Expected to open in early 2005, the 11.4 km double-track branch of East Rail from Tai Wai to Ma On Shan follows an alignment which was reserved during the construction of a trunk road into new residential areas. Heavy rail technology and 25 kV AC electrification were chosen in the light of forecast passenger demand and for compatibility with other KCRC lines. Almost 70% of the route is on viaduct, avoiding busy roads and buried utilities.

Although the population of the line's catchment area is forecast to increase from about 400 000 to more than 700 000 in the next two decades, its financial viability is threatened by strong competition from buses and other carriers already established on the new roads. To attract ridership, the stations are located to serve the residential town clusters; 80% of the passengers are expected to walk to the stations. Four-car trains will generally operate at 3 or 4 min intervals, boarded from open air platforms in passenger-friendly stations.

Considerable effort has been put into reducing the impact of train noise on high-rise flats along the railway, especially during the early morning and late evening. Experience from West Rail led to the adoption of cars fitted with full-length skirts and under-body sound absorbing material, in combination with a multi-plenum and floating track slab to stop noise or vibration at source (RG 9.03 p581). The concrete parapets are topped with lightweight sound-absorbent panels, and the effectiveness of the multi-plenum components has been enhanced by introducing further sound-absorbent material as close as possible to the wheel-rail interface.

The Ma On Shan branch is currently being commissioned, with trial running underway to ensure at least 95% reliability and compliance with the Noise Ordinance before opening for commercial traffic.

Lok Ma Chau

Following rejection of an initial environmental permit application for the Lok Ma Chau Spur Line, KCRC used a single earth pressure balance tunnel boring machine for most of the 5 km of tunnels on the 7-5 km route branching from East Rail at Sheung Shui to reach Lok Ma Chau. The TBM successfully controlled water levels within tightly-prescribed limits during tunnelling, protecting areas of ecological significance.

A design-build lump-sum contract was awarded in January 2003 for the section in tunnel. This was based on an evaluation which combined the marks against technical and financial submissions from carefully vetted bidders. Each of the parallel 8 425 mm diameter bored tunnels is lined with rings of seven 1 -8 m long precast concrete units weighing 7-5 tonnes, fitted with gasket and hydrophilic strips for water tightness.

One of the two drives is now complete, having achieved 25 rings per day in soft ground and seven in hard rock, giving an average of 11 rings per day over the full length of the tunnel.

The cut-and-cover approach tunnel is located immediately beside the main East Rail tracks, and a computerised round-the-clock Cyclops track-level surveillance system is in place throughout the construction period. Pre-agreed alert, alarm and stop work warnings enable KCRC and the contractor to maintain close control over safety-critical construction activity at all times.

The remaining 2-5 km of the Lok Ma Chau line runs on viaduct through highly-sensitive areas of ecological importance; it is close to the Mai Po Marshland, internationally important for migratory and resident birds.

The cross-boundary terminal building at Lok Ma Chau will house customs, immigration, health and police facilities able to process up to 450 000 passengers each day. Construction is making extensive use of precasting, to help keep the work to programme and to minimise the impact of construction on the sensitive surrounding wetland.

Despite the later than planned start, due to the delay in securing the environmental permit for construction, the Lok Ma Chau Spur Line is achieving good progress. It is expected to be completed by the end of 2006, well ahead of the revised programme agreed with the government.

In February 2004 the government invited KCRC and MTR Corp to commence six months of talks on a possible merger. These were due to be completed on August 31. However, during August the government asked for the resulting report to be expanded to include a section dealing with a proposed regional express railway, and extended the deadline to September 16.

In announcing the talks, the government said it was seeking a more objective and transparent fares structure with lower prices, improved interchanges on new railways, and ultimately efficiencies throughout the whole network. Job security of front-line staff must also be ensured.

Many commentators hold the view that whilst KCRC and MTR Corp serve different transport sectors and use different technologies (25 kV AC and 750 V DC respectively), expansion of the rail networks will ultimately lead to the need for merging operations to root out inefficiencies. Impressive though railway expansion has been since the 1960s, and despite increasing competition from road transport providers, it has been said that Hong Kong does not have enough railway for its population density.

Against this is the fact that the government's previous investment in rail by way of equity funding during the start-up of MTR, and more recently for KCRC projects, could become more difficult - given the increasing demands from other areas of Hong Kong's needs. To fund its new railways, MTR Corp became a major player in the property development market, as has KCRC on a more limited scale. Should a merger take place, producing a company with a book value of US$15bn according to some observers, then funding of new railways with minimum government assistance seems a logical step.

Against this background the two corporations and the government would obviously review previously announced projects. The planned railway from Sha Tin through southeast Kowloon and under the harbour to the business district of Hong Kong is a case in point. Previously won by KCRC as a strategic link to carry passengers directly from the Mainland boundary through Kowloon to Hong Kong, a merger would enable the single company to build more stations along the alignment. The line would then attract more passengers to rail thanks to short overall journey times, flexible interchanges and competitive fares.

Similarly, extension of the MTR Kwun Tong Line to the densely-populated Whampoa area could be a popular choice. Enhancing east-west travel opportunities with the Kowloon Southern Link extension, which would link West Rail to connect with the Tsim Sha Tsui extension from Hung Horn, is already a committed project.

MTR Corp has proposed a medium-capacity rail system for Hong Kong Island South, connecting directly with existing mass transit stations. It is also committed to involvement in the Shenzhen Railway network development, which connects with KCRC boundary stations at Lok Ma Chau and Lo Wu.

As Hong Kong and the neighbouring area of the Mainland continue to open up, further expansion of Hong Kong's rail network seems inevitable. The Northern Link connecting West Rail with the boundary crossings at Lok Ma Chau and Lo Wu has been planned by KCRC for some time.

Eventually, however, another through railway will be needed to link Hong Kong with the Pearl River Delta and the rest of Guangzhou Province. Prospective alignments have already been identified, one of which makes use of West Rail and the Northern Link. It is this project which the government wishes to be covered in the merger talks report.

It is clear that the expansion of Hong Kong's rail network will continue for some time to come, perhaps for at least 20 years, depending on funding and the staging of projects to meet passenger demand. Much could depend upon the outcome of the merger talks between the two corporations, and the response from the government and the minority shareholders in MTR Corp.
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Old November 9th, 2004, 10:04 PM   #431
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November 9, 2004
Sarah Liao orders rail checks
Government Press Release

Secretary for the Environment, Transport & Works Dr Sarah Liao has ordered the MTR Corporation to check all its rail tracks after a crack was found on a section between Shek Kip Mei and Prince Edward stations today.

She said the Government is concerned about the MTR's recent spate of service disruptions, and said it is unacceptable that repeated failures should occur.

Whenever there is an incident, the company is urged by the Government to do its best to make an improvement to avoid similar incidents.

Sheung Wan Station
Source : http://www.mbwhk.com/









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Old November 10th, 2004, 02:17 AM   #432
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Why is the platform fenced up? That is a platform right?

Is the station even opened? It looks dead empty.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 02:23 AM   #433
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Those platforms (in the second picture) were built and reserved for the East Kowloon Line. No tracks were laid there. The platform in the forth picture is currently in use and it is partially fenced up because the length of the platform is longer than that of a train. I believe those fences have already been removed because PSDs have been installed in that station.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 08:52 AM   #434
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I found Sheung Wan's empty platform really cool. It had this air of mystery to it, as to what lies beyond those brick walls.........??

I wonder when it'll ever be used.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 09:05 AM   #435
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchan7
I found Sheung Wan's empty platform really cool. It had this air of mystery to it, as to what lies beyond those brick walls.........??

I wonder when it'll ever be used.
probably never.

HA HA HA.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 09:59 AM   #436
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superchan7
I found Sheung Wan's empty platform really cool. It had this air of mystery to it, as to what lies beyond those brick walls.........??

I wonder when it'll ever be used.

Sheung Wan's platform gives me the creeps.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 10:08 AM   #437
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For amateurish rail fans like me, it seems interesting. But for the public, it's probably better to seal it off with a more permanent wall if it's not going to be used. It'd probably be pretty creepy later at night when you should be in places other than an unused metro platform.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 03:09 PM   #438
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ailiton
probably never.

HA HA HA.
Is Sheung Wan a future Interchange Station or a Terminal/End Of The Line Station?

If it is a Terminal Station, isn't it common around the world to have both platforms at a Terminal Station left open so that in the event that a train has yet to depart from one platform, the arriving train can still pull into the other platform and use that instead?

If it was intended to be a future Interchange Station, what line was intended to use that other platform? And why won't that platform be used now even though it was intended to be the platform for another future line?

Freaky, reminds me of the abandoned platforms in NYC's subway system which were originally built to serve passengers but due to changes in original plans, were never used in the end.

Last edited by ignoramus; November 10th, 2004 at 03:20 PM.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 05:08 PM   #439
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Passengers disembark from one platform at Sheung Wan and the train heads off into the tunnel to turn around, so they don't actually park at the station and wait to leave. It works quite differently from other subway systems.
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Old November 10th, 2004, 07:36 PM   #440
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Wednesday, November 10, 2004

Guangzhou - Shenzhen - Hong Kong Rail Link

In March 2002, a joint expert group formed by the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and the relevant Mainland authority embarked on a feasibility study on the development of an express rail link connecting Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Hong Kong. It was reported that the expert group had explored the desirability of adopting a magnetically levitated (Maglev) system for the rail link, but ceased pursuing this option last year in view of the high costs involved. Recently, however, the expert group revisited the option of adopting the Maglev system. With regard to these issues, will the Government inform this Council:

(a) of the latest progress of the study conducted by the expert group on the development of the express rail link; and

(b) how the implementation timetable of the express rail link will be affected by the expert group's revisiting of the option of adopting the Maglev system, and how the Maglev system compares with the wheel-rail system in terms of cost-effectiveness?

Reply

The Joint Expert Group on Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link (the Joint Expert Group) set up by the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau (ETWB) of the Hong Kong SAR Government and the Ministry of Railways (MoR) of the Mainland Government is conducting an investigative study on the feasibility of the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link (ERL).

In the first stage of the study, issues such as the functions and strategic importance of the ERL, the regional transport demand, passenger forecast, and the possible alignments and crossing points of the rail link were studied. Upon the completion of the first stage of the study, the two sides have confirmed the strategic importance of the ERL and embarked on the second stage of the study, in which issues including the railway alignments, station locations, the interface between the Hong Kong and the Mainland sections of the ERL, the major technical standards, passenger forecast and financial viability will be further examined.

Taking into account the latest development of the town planning and traffic network planning on the two sides, the MoR and the ETWB are considering some new ideas for the Mainland and Hong Kong sections of the ERL respectively. On the Mainland side, the MoR is studying the feasibility of using the Mainland section of the ERL to also cater for the Guangzhou-Shenzhen axis of the Pearl River Delta Rapid Transit System.

On the Hong Kong side, we are studying the feasibility of using the West Rail and the Northern Link to form the Hong Kong section of the ERL. The Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation (KCRC) and the MTR Corporation Limited (MTRCL) have provided in their Joint Merger Report a preliminary analysis on the above-mentioned ideas. We have also asked the KCRC to do further planning in the context of its study on the Northern Link.

Included in both the first and second stages of the joint investigative study is an assessment of and a comparison between the wheel-on-track technology and the Maglev technology. If the Maglev technology is adopted, a new and separate rail corridor will have to be built for use by Maglev trains, and it is anticipated that the construction time will be longer than that under the wheel-on-track option.

When analysing the cost effectiveness of the two railway technologies, we have to take into account a number of factors, such as the construction and operation costs, train operating speed, system reliability and compatibility. The extremely low noise level achieved by the Maglev technology, as demonstrated by the operation of Maglev trains in Shanghai, may command an advantage in areas with high population density and should also be taken into account.

The construction cost of railways includes the cost of building the railway tracks and the rolling stocks. Generally speaking, the Maglev technology will attract a higher construction cost than the wheel-on-track technology, but the actual cost will depend on the topography along the railway alignment and whether the railway system is constructed in the urban areas. Moreover, the operation and maintenance costs of a Maglev railway are higher than those of a wheel-on-track railway.

As for the speed of the railway, the design speed of Maglev trains is higher than that of wheel-on-track trains. Nevertheless, a reasonable distance between stations will be required in order to optimize the efficiency of the Maglev system in reducing the journey time.

Regarding the reliability of the railway system, both the wheel-on-track and the Maglev technologies can meet the required safety standards. The use of the wheel-on-track technology has a history of over a hundred years. Therefore, we have more experience over the reliability of rail services and systems offered by the wheel-on-track technology. On the other hand, the commercial operation of the Maglev system is not as widely tested. As regards system compatibility, given that the majority of existing railways in the Mainland and in Hong Kong are wheel-on-track railway systems, direct connection of the ERL with existing wheel-on-track railway networks will not be possible if the Maglev technology is adopted.
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