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Old April 13th, 2007, 03:09 AM   #1741
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MTR Press Release:
New Fare Saver at Kwai Sing Centre in Kwai Hing
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Old April 13th, 2007, 04:43 AM   #1742
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Is the one in TST still there?
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Old April 16th, 2007, 07:13 AM   #1743
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MTR chief hints at increase in fares
Hong Kong Standard
Monday, April 16, 2007

Mass Transit Railway fares are likely to go up, although no fixed date has been set.
The hint came from MTR Corporation chairman Raymond Ch'ien Kuo- fung, who said Sunday the corporation was under pressure to raise fares - a move seen by critics as an attempt to speed up the merger between the MTRC and the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp.

But Ch'ien was quick to deny that a series of television commercials launched recently by the MTRC, and the release of public opinion poll results concerning the merger of the two rails, are aimed at putting pressure on the Legislative Council, which is scrutinizing an amendment ordinance concerning the merger.

Though Ch'ien said he would honor the MTRC's agreement with the government to freeze fares until next April, he refused to say whether the corporation would raise fares after that if the merger plan fails.

"We've not increased our fares for the past 10 years," he said at the MTRC's 2007 Race Walk held Sunday in Central.

"Meanwhile, as our economy continues to flourish over the past two to three years, most workers in Hong Kong have benefited and received pay rises, so did our our colleagues in the MTRC. That's why we have pressure on our operating costs."

Last week the MTRC released the results of a survey which showed that more than 50 percent of people interviewed were unhappy with the Legislative Council's delay in approving the merger of the two railway operators.

Lawmaker Lau Kong-wah, who chairs Legco's transport panel, said Sunday he did not agree with Ch'ien. The MTRC had not cut its fares in times of economic regression, Lau said.

"He [Ch'ien] should have lowered the fares for years. The company still has not lowered fares and I think he should act immediately," said Lau, of the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong.

"What he said today was obviously pressing us, hinting there could be a fare hike soon.

"This is exactly what we're concerned about. We're worried the MTRC may raise its fares quickly if it wants to."

Ch'ien also said he hoped legislation will soon be passed to allow the two rail companies room to lower fares. He said future fare increases will depend on market conditions, but he declined to predict whether the MTRC will raise fares if the merger failed.

Under the MTRC proposals, fare reductions after the merger could be as high as 31.4 percent, with passengers on longer journeys to get steeper fare cuts.

Last Thursday a poll conducted by Hong Kong University and commissioned by the MTRC found that of 509 people polled, 84 percent supported the merger, while 52 percent thought the merger had been moving too slowly since the plan was announced a year ago.

The television commercials released by the MTRC and the KCRC last Wednesday, themed on The Matrix, present a "One Hong Kong-One Integrated Railway" message, touting merger benefits such as fare reductions and the consolidation of single journey tickets.

The Environment, Transport and Works Bureau hopes the merger legislation can be passed before the Legco summer break in July. The Bills Committee studying the Rail Merger Bill has only covered agreements on integrating operations and has just begun considering the details.

The MTR's general manager of corporate relations, Miranda Leung Chan Chi-ming, warned that commuters would suffer if the merger bill is delayed further, saying the deal would clear up clouds of uncertainty among the staff of both corporations.
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Old April 16th, 2007, 01:09 PM   #1744
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sfgadv02 View Post
Is the one in TST still there?
There're two. You may check this on MTR Fare Savers' Webpage.
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Old April 17th, 2007, 07:08 PM   #1745
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Legislators demand cuts in MTR fares
Hong Kong Standard
Tuesday, April 17, 2007

Lawmakers have passed a resolution calling on the MTR Corp to cut fares immediately while barring fare increases for two years after its merger with the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corp.

The nonbinding motion, passed Monday at a meeting of the Bills Committee studying the Rail Merger Bill, called for adoption of a fare adjustment mechanism at the end of the capped-fare period, limiting future fare hikes to a maximum of 10 percent.

The legislators' move followed remarks by MTRC chairman Raymond Ch'ien Kuo-fung Sunday that MTR fares are likely to go up. Although Ch'ien did not specify any date for possible increases, his comments were interpreted by critics as an attempt to speed up the merger of the two rail operators.

Responding to the lawmakers' criticisms, the MTRC has decided to withdraw the television advertising campaign starting today.

Legislators have condemned public relations campaigns launched recently by the two rail operators, which promote merger benefits like fare cuts, saying they are geared toward misleading the public.

An MTRC spokeswoman said the corporation has decided to halt the ad campaign for the time being. "We decided to remind the public of the benefits of the merger through a light- hearted approach, but we don't intend to cause any misunderstanding," she said.

Democrat legislator Lee Wing-tat accused Secretary for the Environment, Transport and Works Sarah Liao Sau- tung of disregarding the legislative process and public interest when she ratified a memorandum with the MTRC last year pledging to reduce fares within two years.

"Bills can take one or two years to pass. Did you have a conscience or think you had acted fairly for the public when you signed an agreement to cut fares, only to have them raised in a few months?" Lee asked.

He also accused the transport chief of colluding with the corporation to cheat the public.

Liao dismissed the allegations, saying the memo resulted from negotiations with the MTRC and was the only achievable outcome within the law.

Unionist lawmaker Lee Cheuk-yan shot back saying: "I'm not calling you a liar, but you knowingly did this, which is worse than cheating and lying. You knew it takes time to enact a law. In negotiations, you allowed them to increase fares after two years. You knowingly let the MTRC exploit the public.

"Who is the biggest shareholder in the MTRC? The government, and the government feels there's a corporate social responsibility to cut fares and to extend the time period."

Lee said any savings resulting from the merger with the KCRC would only be passed on to commuters for a few months, given the expected merger sometime early next year and the expiration of the fare cap period in April 2008.

Calling the release of results of public opinion polls and a series of TV ads "deplorable," Lee Wing-tat said the railway companies have been omitting facts about the tripartite negotiations between them, Legco and the government.

"Liao and the MTRC are not telling the public all the facts and, therefore, they are cheating by only providing some of the facts. With the expected passage of the Rail Merger Bill before July, the MTRC cannot immediately cut fares because it has to go through the legal processes, and call for shareholder meetings. Have you told the public about it? You may need about three months to half a year, which cuts into the fare reduction period," he said.

Legislator Wong Kwok-hing said he was inflamed by the insult to the integrity of the Bills Committee concerning the railway operators' ad campaign, accusing them of trying to force the merger down Legco's throat.

Lau Kong-wah, who chairs the Legco transport panel, said: "The series of actions taken by the MTRC were not accidental. It started almost as soon as we started these discussions."

He justified the legislature's refusal to rush through the bill, saying: "We need to reflect the views of the public, otherwise we're neglecting our duty. None of us is procrastinating."

Miranda Leung Chan Chi-ming, general manager of MTRC's corporate relations department, categorically denied accusations the corporation is pressuring lawmakers into speeding up the merger.

"Members have quite a strong misunderstanding with the company. We have absolutely no intention of bringing pressure to bear on Legislative Council members. If this results in misunderstanding on the part of members, we apologize," she said.

Lau said if there was any delay, it was because the administration's and the MTRC's tardy responses to the legislature's requests had been slowing things down.

Citing the fare adjustment mechanism as the main issue holding things up, Lau said the message he got was that the mechanism was protecting the interests of the company at the expense of the public.

Speaking after a meeting with the executive committee of the Commission on Strategic Development Monday, Liao said: "The fare adjustment mechanism has been in the pipeline for some four years, and should be respected. Rail operators are always under pressure to reduce fares, this is nothing new.

"The mechanism to adjust fares will be implemented immediately after the merger. Fare reduction should not be the only focus. We can't argue over fare cuts forever."

The Bills Committee is to meet again May 4 to discuss the retrofitting of platform doors, extending radio services in cross-harbor tunnels, staff allocation, the fare adjustment mechanism and the fate of the Sha Tin-Central line.
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Old April 18th, 2007, 07:35 AM   #1746
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MTRC rejects demands for toilets
18 April 2007
Hong Kong Standard

The Mass Transit Railway Corporation is unlikely to install toilets in old stations though it will consider fitting them in new lines, the Environment, Transport and Works Bureau said.

Speaking at Tuesday's Legislative Council bills committee scrutinizing the Rail Merger Bill, one the bureau's four deputy secretaries for transport, Patrick Ho Chung-kei, cited site constraints as the major barrier to retrofitting at existing underground stations. MTRC head of operations Wilfred Lau Cheuk-man, said there were no provisions for odor and sewage controls.

Leading the battle for better access to lavatories in MTR stations since the 1980s, New Territories West legislator Albert Chan Wai-yip said his ``blood was boiling'' over the fact retail space in station concourses had been growing over the past 20 years despite a continued lack of washroom facilities.

``If you look at Central station, you can see arrays of shops. That is what they call `prudent commercial principles.' If it can make money, they will make it happen no matter how difficult. But when you want to answer the call of nature, sorry you can't,'' Chan said.

By contrast, every station in Taiwan's Mass Rapid Transit system has clean and odorless toilets.

Frontier convenor Emily Lau Wai- hing said the MTRC was not fulfilling basic needs and suggested the rationale behind providing washrooms at Disney Land Resort Lines for children needed to be extended to other lines.

Speaking on behalf of the Democratic Party, Albert Ho Chun-yan said the MTR was a big system used by a lot of people every day.

``The provision of toilets is necessary and the MTR stations are the most appropriate locations,'' he said. ``We will not block the bill because of a particular issue, but cumulatively, issues will affect our decision.''

Pointing out that KCRC did provide toilets at stations, Ho feared these could be scrapped should there be a merger.

``I'm afraid that after the takeover, they will close all the toilets in the East rail line, turning them into Starbucks,'' he said. ``The claim toilets cannot be retrofitted is nonsense. They can provide shops but no toilets? Its all nonsense.'' New Territories East lawmaker Leung Kwok-hung accused the administration of being out of touch with the railway it operated.

``I have been to stations without toilets, where hygiene conditions are poor. In an emergency, [people] will relieve themselves anywhere. In the past, the MTR lines were very short. The lines are getting longer and longer. It is inhumane not to provide toilets,'' Leung said.

Citing the government as the only body capable of making the MTRC provide public washroom facilities, he also believed the merger discussions provided the best opportunity to get assurances from the rail operator.

Referring to a long-standing problem plaguing residents of Tuen Mun and Yuen Long, New Territories West legislator and Democratic Party chairman Albert Ho Chun-yan relayed doubts in the districts over the lack of fare cuts for West Light Rail services.

``Many in Tuen Mun and Yuen Long are low-income families, so why are passengers of the light rail suffering discrimination? Their traveling costs are high, adding to their living costs,'' he said.

Upset by the administration's unwillingness to force the MTRC to provide concessions for the disabled, social welfare constituency legislator Fernando Cheung Chiu-hung referred to the recommendation made by the chairman of the Equal Opportunities Commission that such concessions be put in place before the merger.

While saying his department did encourage concessions, Raymond Ho said they would be problematic without due compensation for the MTRC and his department would not issue any order without studying its rationalization with other forms of public transport.

``Just because we are the majority shareholder, we shouldn't interfere. Our policy must be consistent,'' he said.

New Territories East legislator and barrister Ronny Tong Ka-wah said the problem with the merger bill is that business came first.

``The administration regards this bill as a business deal. It is a public transport facility affecting a lot of people. The government has the responsibility to provide facilities for the convenience of the public,'' he said.

Accusing the government of trying to wash its hands of public service after the merger, he continued: ``We are an affluent society. Hong Kong has more Rolls Royces per head than any city, yet we have a government that is heartless, and does nothing after hearing the complaints of the people.''

Tong refused to accept the merger, saying its principles were unacceptable.

At the next meeting on April 24, the bills committee will conduct a clause- by-clause study
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Old April 20th, 2007, 03:09 AM   #1747
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MTR Press Release:
Change of Alternate Director
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Old April 23rd, 2007, 06:36 AM   #1748
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Days of deals behind closed doors long gone
22 April 2007
South China Morning Post

Within hours of legislators complaining that an advert the MTR Corporation was running about the merger of its rail operations with the KCRC's was putting pressure on their scrutiny of the Rail Merger Bill, the government-controlled corporation withdrew the ad - a rare move.

Members representing various political parties accused the corporation, in its advert, of not telling the whole truth about the merger. Two legislators urged the corporation to withdraw the advertisement.

MTR Corp executives denied the corporation had intended to put pressure on lawmakers, and said it had pulled the advertisement to avoid any misunderstanding.

Set against the background of chit-chat between pupils and their teacher in a classroom, the advert sought to soft-sell the benefits of the partly privatised corporation taking over the running of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation's rail lines for 50 years. The ad was launched after the release two weeks ago of a survey, commissioned by the MTR Corp, in which 52 per cent of those polled said they were unhappy with the merger's progress.

There is no denying the corporation was trying to draw the public's attention to what it and the government perceive as slow progress on scrutiny of the bill. Put bluntly, it was a clear attempt to solicit the public's support and prompt lawmakers to speed up their work.

Opinion surveys, letters to the editor, petitions and rallies, and newspaper and television advertisements have become regular features of debate on major issues. This is because public opinion has become increasingly important in the process of policy formulation. Government, legislators, public bodies and even business corporations ignore public opinion at their peril.

The days when government officials and big corporations could make a deal behind closed doors, then have it rubber-stamped by the Legislative Council are long gone.

At a time when the political system is only partly democratic, the process of policymaking is vulnerable to pressure from various sectors, such as the media and society at large.

With the importance of public opinion in policymaking growing, various stakeholders and ordinary citizens now understand better how to fight for their best interests.

It is, therefore, hardly surprising that the MTR Corp moved to play the game, given there was no sign legislators would soon complete their scrutiny of the bill.

By the same token, it is also perfectly legitimate for lawmakers to fight what they saw as pressure from the corporation. Whether the calls by some legislators for the ad to be pulled were excessive is for the public to judge.

Even if the MTR Corp had decided not to withdraw the advertisement, there is little chance the issue would have caused a big controversy. Anyone who seriously thinks otherwise either overestimates the influence of lawmakers or underestimates the common sense and political maturity of the public.

To claim, as some have done, that the call by legislators for the ad to be pulled was tantamount to political intimidation of the corporation is an exaggeration. Like many controversial Legco encounters, the row has proved to be a storm in a teacup. If anything, the controversy says something about the at times contradictory mentality of many in society towards the game of politics.

While big corporations are resigned to the fact that they have to play this game, they have become hesitant and unsure about how far they should go when their political acts cause a stir.

Some lawmakers, accustomed as they are to trying to put the government on the back foot by acting as champions of public opinion, overreacted when they found themselves on the end of someone else's publicity campaign.

Perhaps it just goes to show that all's fair in the game of politics.
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Old April 24th, 2007, 04:27 AM   #1749
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Toliets in MTR stations. A hope has been around for years.
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Old April 25th, 2007, 01:39 AM   #1750
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Quote:
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Toliets in MTR stations. A hope has been around for years.
I dont really see a need for the more urban ones. They're so well connected to shopping centers, just walk up the stairs. Plus, it helps keep maintenance costs down. I've had occasions when I had to go, but usually there's a shopping center connected to the station.
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Old April 25th, 2007, 12:45 PM   #1751
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KCRC Press Release:
KCRC 2006 Report Published

Webpage of the Annual Reports
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Old April 25th, 2007, 05:47 PM   #1752
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I dont really see a need for the more urban ones. They're so well connected to shopping centers, just walk up the stairs. Plus, it helps keep maintenance costs down. I've had occasions when I had to go, but usually there's a shopping center connected to the station.
But if you are in the paid area, you are screwed, or you will have to pay again to get on the train unlike KCR which has lavatories inside the paid area.
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Old April 27th, 2007, 07:41 AM   #1753
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RTHK news:
CE urged to review KCRC gratuity after huge payout to chief
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Old April 27th, 2007, 01:02 PM   #1754
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RTHK news:
KCRC to replace all transformers after West Rail fire

Lawmaker Andrew Cheng unhappy with KCRC report
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Old April 28th, 2007, 06:42 PM   #1755
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Toilets will add a lot of engineering and maintenance problems as they will need to find the space to put them in, and hook up to the infrastructure. Security risk is also a major problem as well. Since people don't spend hours on the subway, let them find a place to go before they enter or after they leave the station.
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Old April 28th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #1756
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I think a good compromise would to be to have an exit pointing to the nearest public restrooms, and in the future have one in a neighbouring development as close to the station as possible.
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Old April 28th, 2007, 10:51 PM   #1757
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Wow, that sounds like a huge operation. And they were saying how the transformers were working just great even in the first few weeks after the incident!
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Old April 29th, 2007, 02:37 AM   #1758
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Toilets? Aren't they afraid of bombs? In London they don't even have bins in the stations, thanks to the bloody IRA.
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Old April 29th, 2007, 06:33 AM   #1759
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AAMOF, MTR stations DO HAVE toilets, but they're for staff only, expect Sunny Bay and Disneyland Resort Stations. However, you can ask the staff to use the toilet if you're really urgent. I did this for several times.

I don't argee with adding toilets within the underground stations for the reason of safety, but I argee with adding toilets outside the stations, just like the toilets outside the new stations of the Tseung Kwan O Line.
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Old April 29th, 2007, 08:51 PM   #1760
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Well, there're a few along Tung Chung line..
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