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View Poll Results: host city of Olympics 2012
London, UK 280 25.23%
Madrid, Spain 342 30.81%
Moscow, Russia 90 8.11%
New York, USA 206 18.56%
Paris, France 192 17.30%
Voters: 1110. You may not vote on this poll

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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:13 AM   #5641
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I think Rio is going to win.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:16 AM   #5642
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onn View Post
Why in the world would China delegates vote for Rio over Chicago? It's logical they would vote for Chicago because they see money. You have to be kidding me, you don't see the logic there? I'm not being bias in this case, look at history. Look at where most of the previous Olympics have been, that's a pretty good indictor of where this vote is going.
Ohh, that's very logic! Look at how things have been goin' on til now, that indicates they'll remain this way forever

Are you sure you understand the true definition of LOGIC? Please, don't use widely employed terms that way, it might lead to misunderstandment...

So, in your concept, the ONLY variable ever evaluated by the delegates is "money"?? What is this, I though the historical materialism had died with Marx

Some thing simply can't be quantified and capitalized. Excitement is one of them, otherwise Tokyo would be FAR more eligible to win the dispute, being that they're the world's second richest country and haven't seen an OG for half a century...

If money is all that matters in the dispute, why don't make ALL the Olympics in the US? It's by far the biggest consuming market in the world, significantly bigger than the own EU!

Summing it all up - no, there's no "logic" in your statement, but, purely, a matter of "guess"...
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4 ∀x∀y∃z(x∈z∧y∈z) ____5 ∀F∃A∀Y∀x[(x∈Y∧Y∈F)⇒x∈A] ____6 ∀x∀w_1∀w_2...∀w_n[∀x(x∈A⇒∃!y∅)⇒∃B∀x(x∈A⇒∃y(y∈B∧∅))]
7 ∃X[∅∈X∧∀y(y∈X⇒S(y)∈X)] ____8 ∀x∃Q(x)∀z[z⊆x⇒z∈Q(x)] ____9 ∀X∃R(R well-orders X)
10 V=ULTIMATE L
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:17 AM   #5643
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And could you (seccondcity) PLEASE stop repeating that abomination of misinformation that "Rio's the capital of Brazil"!? That really makes me sick!
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4 ∀x∀y∃z(x∈z∧y∈z) ____5 ∀F∃A∀Y∀x[(x∈Y∧Y∈F)⇒x∈A] ____6 ∀x∀w_1∀w_2...∀w_n[∀x(x∈A⇒∃!y∅)⇒∃B∀x(x∈A⇒∃y(y∈B∧∅))]
7 ∃X[∅∈X∧∀y(y∈X⇒S(y)∈X)] ____8 ∀x∃Q(x)∀z[z⊆x⇒z∈Q(x)] ____9 ∀X∃R(R well-orders X)
10 V=ULTIMATE L
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:22 AM   #5644
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Rio's Olympics Quest: Can It Handle the 2016 Games?
By Andrew Downie / São Paulo Friday, Sep. 25, 2009
TIME.COM

If life is fair, then the International Olympic Committee will next week declare that Brazil has been chosen to host the 2016 Summer Olympics and thus become the first South American nation to win one of sports' greatest honors.

The other main contenders are the U.S., Spain and Japan, and they've all hosted the Olympics before. So, Brazilians, with their beaches, sun, and a vibrant economy whose recent performance has shamed many developing-world rivals, believe that Rio de Janiero — and South America — deserves the chance to show what it can do.

"It isn't right that the Olympics be held in the U.S. for the eighth time," Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva said recently, in what was just one in a series of typical appeals to IOC delegates. "It's not possible that it be in England in 2012 and in another European country in 2016 ... It's not fair that Brazil, one of the 10 biggest economies in the world for 30 years; that Brazil, one of the world's industrialized countries, a nation that has demonstrated its love for sports; it's not fair that Brazil not be chosen."

Lula has a point, but as the former union leader knows, life isn't always fair. If it were, then Rio, while a front runner, would be in a stronger position to win next Friday's decision and edge out Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo. It can claim experience: Rio hosted the Pan American Games in 2007, an event that should have transformed the still sometimes provincial resort into a more modern, more international and safer city.

The problem is, it didn't quite do that. Winning the 2007 Pan American Games was considered a big, if sometimes chaotic, success for Rio. To triumph over rival bidder San Antonio, officials used the same argument — that this was Rio's turn. To back that up, they promised to transform the city with a new ring road system, something called a "via light" railway (presumably a light railway), a new state highway and 54 km of new metro lines.

But none of the roads, nary a kilometer of metro line, were built. Authorities also promised to clean up the Guanabara Bay, the fetid body of water whose smell assails visitors driving into town from the international airport. Although hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent, the stench persists and the bay remains a stinking eyesore.

Those broken promises are still an issue for those admittedly few Cariocas who care about such things. The Pan Ams might have provided a three-week jamboree for millions of athletes, locals and visitors, but when the closing ceremony ended, the city returned to its usual mess, said Chico Alencar, a Rio Congressman who campaigned for investigations into the massive overspending at the Pan Am Games. "The chronic problems that we have here are the same as they always were," Alencar said. "I want Rio to win the right to host the games, but we need to learn from our past mistakes and the myth of the Pan American Games and all that they didn't leave behind. If we get the Olympics, then all sectors of society need to unite to ensure that there is a social legacy and no overspending."

The Pan Ams reportedly ended up costing many times the original estimate of $177 million, a phenomenal amount given that none of the money went to the promised infrastructure projects. (Some reports had the final costs in Rio close to $2 billion; the costs of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, according to Chinese organizers, totaled roughly $2.5 billion.) Some commentators said that was indicative of corruption, but it also suggests serious deficiencies in organization and planning. "Brazil is still learning how to do continuous public policy," Alencar said. "Public works are emergency, localized, specific. There is no strategic planning involved. That was what happened with the Pan Ams."

More worrying still is that lessons appear not to have been learned. Almost two years after Brazil was awarded the right to host the 2014 soccer World Cup, work has yet to start on its 12 stadiums. A proposed bullet train linking São Paulo and Rio is supposed to be operational in time for the tournament, but the official tender has not been issued yet, and even politicians are now admitting it could be late.

Nevertheless, those betting on Rio may take heart from the fact that the IOC appears to have skimmed over the Pan Am Games debacle. Rio's bid, which promises more such transport links and infrastructure projects, was described as "detailed and of a very high quality" by the games committee in its most recent report. Another upside is that Rio has a well-deserved reputation as one of the world's most stunningly beautiful and welcoming cities. The third upside is the one that Lula and Rio officials have been hammering home: that fair is fair; that this is South America's turn. It is a valid argument. South America deserves its chance. But it also needs someone to make sure it keeps its promises.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:22 AM   #5645
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Have a heart, it was only a scant fifty years ago.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:28 AM   #5646
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Chicago's Olympic Dreams
By Sean Gregory Monday, Oct. 05, 2009
Chicago's plans would turn Lake Michigan into a sprawling sports complex.
Chicago 2016
TIME.COM

Whether you're one of those Windy City residents who favor Chicago's bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics or you believe the whole project is just ripe for Capone-style corruption, know this: when you're standing on the shores of Lake Michigan, it's easy to imagine an idyllic Olympic experience. With Grant Park and the tip of the Willis (né Sears) Tower at your back, gaze out at the site of the planned rowing venue. Instead of the geese you hear honking, imagine coxswains barking at their boat mates. A comfortable breeze blows in your face on a sun-splashed Saturday afternoon. "Look around," says Casie Piejko, an Olympic supporter and a 30-year city resident, during a break from biking along the lake. "It's beautiful."


Chicago learns its Olympic fate on Oct. 2, when members of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) meet in Copenhagen to award the 2016 Games. Madrid, Rio de Janeiro and Tokyo are the other contenders, and boosters say the Second City has a fighting chance. First, it offers a compact proposal: about 90% of the athletes would compete within a 15-minute drive of the proposed Olympic Village site, not far from Chicago's downtown. Many events would take place in city parks, and most new facilities — including the 80,000-seat Olympic Stadium, scheduled for the South Side's Washington Park — would be temporary, a strategy intended to avert the Olympics' worst legacy, expensive venues that sit idle for years. And then there's the Obama factor: the leader of the free world calls Chicago home and has been an avowed supporter of the bid from the start.


What's attractive to well-heeled fans and Latvian weight lifters, however, doesn't always help a host city or its residents. Critics of the bid say that while the Olympics might provide construction jobs and an influx of revenue, any boost would be short-lived. "To make a city prosperous, it's about brainpower, not block parties," says Tom Tresser, an organizer for the opposition group No Games Chicago. Though Mayor Richard Daley has promised that local taxpayers wouldn't pay a dime of the Games' estimated $4.8 billion cost, he's also signed an agreement with the IOC that puts the city on the hook for any excessive cost overruns — an Olympic tradition as common as crying. London, the 2012 host, is already on pace to spend more than $13 billion, nearly triple its original budget.

As the decision day approaches, Chicago is covered in Olympic hype. Banners are draped around downtown, and Olympic athletes are even delivering prerecorded pro-bid messages on Chicago's buses. But overall, support for the effort has slipped: just 47% of residents favor hosting the Games, according to a poll taken in late August, compared with 61% in February.


Some Chicagoans seem not to want the hassle. Construction of the Olympic Stadium would make much of Washington Park inaccessible for at least six months. "I love this park," says Aaron Fonville, 42, while watching a neighborhood baseball game on a recent Sunday. "I don't want to see anyone messing with its preservation." The $1 billion Olympic Village, meanwhile, is scheduled to replace a set of historic hospital buildings designed by famed German Modernist Walter Gropius — a plan that Jonathan Fine, executive director of Preservation Chicago, calls "cultural vandalism."

Such Olympian angst may be moot. IOC insiders believe Rio's bid is gaining favor (South America has never hosted an Olympics), and even the O factor could fizzle. While 11th-hour schmoozing by Tony Blair and Vladimir Putin helped secure wins for London and Sochi, host of the 2014 Winter Games, Barack Obama can't afford to leave Washington during the health-care debate. So, absent a surprise change of heart by the President, First Lady Michelle Obama, another South Side superstar, will have to try to seal the deal solo. "Mrs. Obama is certainly a dynamic addition to the U.S. delegation," says veteran IOC member Dick Pound, a Canadian. "But if you had the dynamic duo, it would be a significant advantage for the States."
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:36 AM   #5647
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redspork02 View Post
Rio's Olympics Quest: Can It Handle the 2016 Games?
By Andrew Downie / São Paulo Friday, Sep. 25, 2009
TIME.COM

If life is fair, then the International Olympic Committee will next week declare that Brazil has been chosen to host the 2016 Summer Olympics and thus become the first South American nation to win one of sports' greatest honors.

The other main contenders are the U.S., Spain and Japan, and they've all hosted the Olympics before. So, Brazilians, with their beaches, sun, and a vibrant economy whose recent performance has shamed many developing-world rivals, believe that Rio de Janiero — and South America — deserves the chance to show what it can do.

"It isn't right that the Olympics be held in the U.S. for the eighth time," Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva said recently, in what was just one in a series of typical appeals to IOC delegates. "It's not possible that it be in England in 2012 and in another European country in 2016 ... It's not fair that Brazil, one of the 10 biggest economies in the world for 30 years; that Brazil, one of the world's industrialized countries, a nation that has demonstrated its love for sports; it's not fair that Brazil not be chosen."

Lula has a point, but as the former union leader knows, life isn't always fair. If it were, then Rio, while a front runner, would be in a stronger position to win next Friday's decision and edge out Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo. It can claim experience: Rio hosted the Pan American Games in 2007, an event that should have transformed the still sometimes provincial resort into a more modern, more international and safer city.

The problem is, it didn't quite do that. Winning the 2007 Pan American Games was considered a big, if sometimes chaotic, success for Rio. To triumph over rival bidder San Antonio, officials used the same argument — that this was Rio's turn. To back that up, they promised to transform the city with a new ring road system, something called a "via light" railway (presumably a light railway), a new state highway and 54 km of new metro lines.

But none of the roads, nary a kilometer of metro line, were built. Authorities also promised to clean up the Guanabara Bay, the fetid body of water whose smell assails visitors driving into town from the international airport. Although hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent, the stench persists and the bay remains a stinking eyesore.

Those broken promises are still an issue for those admittedly few Cariocas who care about such things. The Pan Ams might have provided a three-week jamboree for millions of athletes, locals and visitors, but when the closing ceremony ended, the city returned to its usual mess, said Chico Alencar, a Rio Congressman who campaigned for investigations into the massive overspending at the Pan Am Games. "The chronic problems that we have here are the same as they always were," Alencar said. "I want Rio to win the right to host the games, but we need to learn from our past mistakes and the myth of the Pan American Games and all that they didn't leave behind. If we get the Olympics, then all sectors of society need to unite to ensure that there is a social legacy and no overspending."

The Pan Ams reportedly ended up costing many times the original estimate of $177 million, a phenomenal amount given that none of the money went to the promised infrastructure projects. (Some reports had the final costs in Rio close to $2 billion; the costs of the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, according to Chinese organizers, totaled roughly $2.5 billion.) Some commentators said that was indicative of corruption, but it also suggests serious deficiencies in organization and planning. "Brazil is still learning how to do continuous public policy," Alencar said. "Public works are emergency, localized, specific. There is no strategic planning involved. That was what happened with the Pan Ams."

More worrying still is that lessons appear not to have been learned. Almost two years after Brazil was awarded the right to host the 2014 soccer World Cup, work has yet to start on its 12 stadiums. A proposed bullet train linking São Paulo and Rio is supposed to be operational in time for the tournament, but the official tender has not been issued yet, and even politicians are now admitting it could be late.

Nevertheless, those betting on Rio may take heart from the fact that the IOC appears to have skimmed over the Pan Am Games debacle. Rio's bid, which promises more such transport links and infrastructure projects, was described as "detailed and of a very high quality" by the games committee in its most recent report. Another upside is that Rio has a well-deserved reputation as one of the world's most stunningly beautiful and welcoming cities. The third upside is the one that Lula and Rio officials have been hammering home: that fair is fair; that this is South America's turn. It is a valid argument. South America deserves its chance. But it also needs someone to make sure it keeps its promises.
Is this subject going to be here as well!? Isn't it enough to have to deal with some São Paulo envidious from the Brazilian Forum?

I'll repeat only once:

1) The "promosed infrastructure" was made by a politician not very devote of it's duty's integrity, and initially (when the city was chosen) had ABSOLUTELY no support whatsoever from the other government levels (state, union), being the bid purely an effect of it's magalomania and self-promotion. Afterwars, the union ended up having to cover for the gorwing debts of the mayor and the event turned out, if "thiner" than promised, truly remarcable and well spoken on nealry every media on the planet, and regarded widely as the best edition of the PanAm's EVER.

2) Besides of all these "downpoints" (as small as they are), the games we're a sucess on every front, and despite the spending's of over US$ 2 billion dollars, it had a total revenue of 10!!!

3) All the projects and promises made by the Rio 2016 bid are fully backed on EVERY level by the city, state and union with absolute commitment, and have it has already been aproved all the necessary legislation to ensure the realization fo the games and the city, as well as created a line of credit for the event, besides of all the governmental and corporational guarantees which got signed and delivered to the IOC, who described it of "a very high quality" and "completely factuable".

So, this is it! Don't go on the small talks of any biased media before making your own judgement of weather a city should or not be chosen...
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4 ∀x∀y∃z(x∈z∧y∈z) ____5 ∀F∃A∀Y∀x[(x∈Y∧Y∈F)⇒x∈A] ____6 ∀x∀w_1∀w_2...∀w_n[∀x(x∈A⇒∃!y∅)⇒∃B∀x(x∈A⇒∃y(y∈B∧∅))]
7 ∃X[∅∈X∧∀y(y∈X⇒S(y)∈X)] ____8 ∀x∃Q(x)∀z[z⊆x⇒z∈Q(x)] ____9 ∀X∃R(R well-orders X)
10 V=ULTIMATE L
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:48 AM   #5648
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wey View Post

2) Besides of all these "downpoints" (as small as they are), the games we're a sucess on every front, and despite the spending's of over US$ 2 billion dollars, it had a total revenue of 10!!!

...
That would give the Pan Am's revenue twice of what any of the 2016 candidates are projecting I believe. How likely is that? Sounds like funny math to me.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:51 AM   #5649
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Tokyo City forever!!!

www.khabar.kz /"Khabar" Information Agency/
“ … From all the above cities, claiming an Olympics-2016, only Tokyo - capital of Japan - IOC Commission fully meets all choice for compliance with the financial and infrastructure. Both commented on the members of the IOC, inspecting all four cities-the pretender ”.
What German group "Tokio Hotel "…

… and his Russian counterpart of "Tokyo"!
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Old September 26th, 2009, 08:55 AM   #5650
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Funny How the "Tokyo supporters" above is wearing a CHICAGO White SOX Baseball cap.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 09:06 AM   #5651
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Of course I know Rio is not the capital of Brazil, Brasilia is. It was a mistake from the article.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wey View Post
And could you (seccondcity) PLEASE stop repeating that abomination of misinformation that "Rio's the capital of Brazil"!? That really makes me sick!
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Old September 26th, 2009, 04:37 PM   #5652
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IOC should make Rio happiest city in the world


ATHLETICS: Next Friday the International Olympic Committee stage their 121st session in Copenhagen to announce the host city for the 2016 Olympics

BARACK OBAMA has had one helluva week, and suddenly it seems he’s finding it harder to say “Yes We Can” than say “No I Can’t”. If Abraham Lincoln realised you can’t please all of the people all of the time, maybe Obama is now discovering exactly what that meant. Between trying to save the health of his nation – and indeed planet earth itself – he’s a very busy man. But can he save Chicago’s bid for the 2016 Olympics? “No He Won’t”, it would appear. Obama has more pressing matters to deal with.

On Sunday, he gave five separate interviews to US morning television trying to sell his health care reforms. Then he attended the United Nations special summit and tried to cool the climate change negotiations. On Wednesday, in his first speech to the UN General Assembly, Obama tried to promote a new era of US engagement with the world. From there he went to Pittsburgh, where for the past two days he’s been trying to stabilise the global financial economic crisis at latest G-20 summit.

Obama also goes to bed at night trying to work out solutions to Afghanistan, Pakistan and why American job losses are still rising. But government health care has been a leading item on the US agenda at least since Harry Truman first proposed it, in 1946, and if Obama succeeds on this, it would define his presidency more than any other issue. If he fails his legacy may well be “No He Couldn’t”.

Surely that’s enough for one man to worry about? All of which explains why next Friday, when the International Olympic Committee (IOC) stage their 121st session in Copenhagen to announce the host city for the 2016 Olympics, Obama will be on Capitol Hill debating health care. At least that’s the plan – and while many people in Chicago believe he’s doing a great disservice to their Olympic bid by not going to Copenhagen, others believe he’s doing them a service by staying away. When asked if they really want the Olympics in 2016, many Chicagoans answer “No We Don’t”.

That plan, however, may change. Obama’s advisers are keeping their options open, and dispatched an advance team to Copenhagen in case he does decide stop by next Friday after all.

In the meantime, Obama has written a letter to the IOC promising that the US would “welcome the world with open arms” if Chicago were selected. Plus he’s sending his wife, First Lady Michelle, to work the room in his absence. Oprah Winfrey is coming along too, by the way.

Truth is, Chicago will probably need more than the US President in Copenhagen next Friday to save their Olympic bid. The three other bidding cities appear to have a little more going for them; Madrid and Tokyo look more reliable, and Rio de Janeiro looks, well, more enjoyable. No one really knows how the 107 IOC members will vote next Friday, but for what it’s worth, my vote goes to Rio.

Still, should Obama make it to Copenhagen, his presence can’t be underestimated. Four years ago, Paris was fancied to get the nod for the 2012 Olympics ahead of London, Madrid, Moscow and New York – before British Prime Minister Tony Blair was the only leader of the five candidate countries to lobby the IOC session personally in Singapore, and we all know what happened next (London beat Paris by four votes).

IOC president Jacques Rogge says the 2016 vote should be equally close: “I see really no favourite. I think it’s going to be a very close vote. There is no bid that is lagging behind. All the scenarios are possible.”

It used to be that the city which offered the best bribes won the vote (Atlanta 1996, Salt Lake City 2002, etc) but these days it’s a lot more ethical. In fact, the IOC members are no longer allowed visit the bid cities, and instead the IOC send their 13-member Evaluation Commission. They spent four days in each of the bid cities back in April and May, and on September 2nd released their 98-page evaluation report. This doesn’t rank or grade the candidates, but rather assesses technical criteria such as venues, budgets, transportation plans, accommodation, security and public support.

The report may provide a guide for which way the IOC vote next Friday, but a lot can change on the day itself. Each city makes a final presentation which can swing the thing, and many IOC members still vote for individual reasons, including geopolitical factors. Plus the winning city is only decided after a round of votes, by secret ballot; each time a city with the fewest votes is eliminated, until a city has the majority of the votes. A lot depends on how the eliminated cities row behind those still left in.

It helps, however, if your country’s leader is in town. Spanish King Juan Carlos will be in Copenhagen, and the Madrid bid is impressive. They’re promising the “Games with the Human Touch”, and they have huge public support. But from the beginning, the Madrid bid has had one big weakness: it is located in Europe, and it’s unlikely the IOC would choose another European host right after London.

Tokyo have the backing of Japan’s new Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama, although, like Obama, he’s unlikely to travel, and likewise has sent a letter of support.

It’s Tokyo’s first Olympic bid since hosting the Games in 1964, and with the motto “Uniting Our Worlds” have presented an appealing and compact city-centre venue plan. But the same way Madrid could be hampered by being so close to London, it’s likely the IOC will feel Tokyo is still too close to Beijing.

Chicago has a history of failed Olympic bids, losing out in 1952 and 1956, and hasn’t had the best of bids this time either, particularly in budgetary terms. They’ve also had to change their motto to “Let Friendship Shine” after their original one, “Stir the Soul”, translated in several languages as “Stir Your Insides”.

If Obama does show up in Copenhagen next Friday then it can’t be discounted, but many IOC members will recall the transport disaster that unfolded in Atlanta and fear Chicago could be as bad.

So to Rio – the sentimental and geographical favourite given their wish of staging the Olympics in South America for the first time. Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has been campaigning hard for the IOC vote, and he’ll be in Copenhagen next Friday looking to seal the deal. He has every chance. The language used in Rio’s evaluation summary seemed to favour its bid, and as Silva has been pointing out, “it’s not a competition that can be only for the rich or high society”.

Rio is not only claiming great venues, but according to Forbes is the happiest city in the world. The IOC pointed out a potential conflict with Brazil staging the 2014 World Cup, but Rio reckons it’s a great idea to have both events with two years apart. Hard to argue with that one.

Unlike Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo, Rio is the one city bidding for the 2016 Olympics.
IOC should make Rio happiest city in the world
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For one week in September, Footy rules Down UnderIrish trio harbour genuine hopesTitle battle opens in light airsRenault's Grosjean crashes into same wall as PiquetMental strength still key to Kingdom's reignSchmooze operators can swing the oddsIAN O'RIORDANATHLETICS: Next Friday the International Olympic Committee stage their 121st session in Copenhagen to announce the host city for the 2016 Olympics

BARACK OBAMA has had one helluva week, and suddenly it seems he’s finding it harder to say “Yes We Can” than say “No I Can’t”. If Abraham Lincoln realised you can’t please all of the people all of the time, maybe Obama is now discovering exactly what that meant. Between trying to save the health of his nation – and indeed planet earth itself – he’s a very busy man. But can he save Chicago’s bid for the 2016 Olympics? “No He Won’t”, it would appear. Obama has more pressing matters to deal with.

On Sunday, he gave five separate interviews to US morning television trying to sell his health care reforms. Then he attended the United Nations special summit and tried to cool the climate change negotiations. On Wednesday, in his first speech to the UN General Assembly, Obama tried to promote a new era of US engagement with the world. From there he went to Pittsburgh, where for the past two days he’s been trying to stabilise the global financial economic crisis at latest G-20 summit.

Obama also goes to bed at night trying to work out solutions to Afghanistan, Pakistan and why American job losses are still rising. But government health care has been a leading item on the US agenda at least since Harry Truman first proposed it, in 1946, and if Obama succeeds on this, it would define his presidency more than any other issue. If he fails his legacy may well be “No He Couldn’t”.

Surely that’s enough for one man to worry about? All of which explains why next Friday, when the International Olympic Committee (IOC) stage their 121st session in Copenhagen to announce the host city for the 2016 Olympics, Obama will be on Capitol Hill debating health care. At least that’s the plan – and while many people in Chicago believe he’s doing a great disservice to their Olympic bid by not going to Copenhagen, others believe he’s doing them a service by staying away. When asked if they really want the Olympics in 2016, many Chicagoans answer “No We Don’t”.

That plan, however, may change. Obama’s advisers are keeping their options open, and dispatched an advance team to Copenhagen in case he does decide stop by next Friday after all.

In the meantime, Obama has written a letter to the IOC promising that the US would “welcome the world with open arms” if Chicago were selected. Plus he’s sending his wife, First Lady Michelle, to work the room in his absence. Oprah Winfrey is coming along too, by the way.

Truth is, Chicago will probably need more than the US President in Copenhagen next Friday to save their Olympic bid. The three other bidding cities appear to have a little more going for them; Madrid and Tokyo look more reliable, and Rio de Janeiro looks, well, more enjoyable. No one really knows how the 107 IOC members will vote next Friday, but for what it’s worth, my vote goes to Rio.

Still, should Obama make it to Copenhagen, his presence can’t be underestimated. Four years ago, Paris was fancied to get the nod for the 2012 Olympics ahead of London, Madrid, Moscow and New York – before British Prime Minister Tony Blair was the only leader of the five candidate countries to lobby the IOC session personally in Singapore, and we all know what happened next (London beat Paris by four votes).

IOC president Jacques Rogge says the 2016 vote should be equally close: “I see really no favourite. I think it’s going to be a very close vote. There is no bid that is lagging behind. All the scenarios are possible.”

It used to be that the city which offered the best bribes won the vote (Atlanta 1996, Salt Lake City 2002, etc) but these days it’s a lot more ethical. In fact, the IOC members are no longer allowed visit the bid cities, and instead the IOC send their 13-member Evaluation Commission. They spent four days in each of the bid cities back in April and May, and on September 2nd released their 98-page evaluation report. This doesn’t rank or grade the candidates, but rather assesses technical criteria such as venues, budgets, transportation plans, accommodation, security and public support.

The report may provide a guide for which way the IOC vote next Friday, but a lot can change on the day itself. Each city makes a final presentation which can swing the thing, and many IOC members still vote for individual reasons, including geopolitical factors. Plus the winning city is only decided after a round of votes, by secret ballot; each time a city with the fewest votes is eliminated, until a city has the majority of the votes. A lot depends on how the eliminated cities row behind those still left in.

It helps, however, if your country’s leader is in town. Spanish King Juan Carlos will be in Copenhagen, and the Madrid bid is impressive. They’re promising the “Games with the Human Touch”, and they have huge public support. But from the beginning, the Madrid bid has had one big weakness: it is located in Europe, and it’s unlikely the IOC would choose another European host right after London.

Tokyo have the backing of Japan’s new Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama, although, like Obama, he’s unlikely to travel, and likewise has sent a letter of support.

It’s Tokyo’s first Olympic bid since hosting the Games in 1964, and with the motto “Uniting Our Worlds” have presented an appealing and compact city-centre venue plan. But the same way Madrid could be hampered by being so close to London, it’s likely the IOC will feel Tokyo is still too close to Beijing.

Chicago has a history of failed Olympic bids, losing out in 1952 and 1956, and hasn’t had the best of bids this time either, particularly in budgetary terms. They’ve also had to change their motto to “Let Friendship Shine” after their original one, “Stir the Soul”, translated in several languages as “Stir Your Insides”.

If Obama does show up in Copenhagen next Friday then it can’t be discounted, but many IOC members will recall the transport disaster that unfolded in Atlanta and fear Chicago could be as bad.

So to Rio – the sentimental and geographical favourite given their wish of staging the Olympics in South America for the first time. Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has been campaigning hard for the IOC vote, and he’ll be in Copenhagen next Friday looking to seal the deal. He has every chance. The language used in Rio’s evaluation summary seemed to favour its bid, and as Silva has been pointing out, “it’s not a competition that can be only for the rich or high society”.

Rio is not only claiming great venues, but according to Forbes is the happiest city in the world. The IOC pointed out a potential conflict with Brazil staging the 2014 World Cup, but Rio reckons it’s a great idea to have both events with two years apart. Hard to argue with that one.

Unlike Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo, Rio is the one city bidding for the 2016 Olympics

IOC should make Rio happiest city in the world
In this section »
For one week in September, Footy rules Down UnderIrish trio harbour genuine hopesTitle battle opens in light airsRenault's Grosjean crashes into same wall as PiquetMental strength still key to Kingdom's reignSchmooze operators can swing the oddsIAN O'RIORDANATHLETICS: Next Friday the International Olympic Committee stage their 121st session in Copenhagen to announce the host city for the 2016 Olympics

BARACK OBAMA has had one helluva week, and suddenly it seems he’s finding it harder to say “Yes We Can” than say “No I Can’t”. If Abraham Lincoln realised you can’t please all of the people all of the time, maybe Obama is now discovering exactly what that meant. Between trying to save the health of his nation – and indeed planet earth itself – he’s a very busy man. But can he save Chicago’s bid for the 2016 Olympics? “No He Won’t”, it would appear. Obama has more pressing matters to deal with.

On Sunday, he gave five separate interviews to US morning television trying to sell his health care reforms. Then he attended the United Nations special summit and tried to cool the climate change negotiations. On Wednesday, in his first speech to the UN General Assembly, Obama tried to promote a new era of US engagement with the world. From there he went to Pittsburgh, where for the past two days he’s been trying to stabilise the global financial economic crisis at latest G-20 summit.

Obama also goes to bed at night trying to work out solutions to Afghanistan, Pakistan and why American job losses are still rising. But government health care has been a leading item on the US agenda at least since Harry Truman first proposed it, in 1946, and if Obama succeeds on this, it would define his presidency more than any other issue. If he fails his legacy may well be “No He Couldn’t”.

Surely that’s enough for one man to worry about? All of which explains why next Friday, when the International Olympic Committee (IOC) stage their 121st session in Copenhagen to announce the host city for the 2016 Olympics, Obama will be on Capitol Hill debating health care. At least that’s the plan – and while many people in Chicago believe he’s doing a great disservice to their Olympic bid by not going to Copenhagen, others believe he’s doing them a service by staying away. When asked if they really want the Olympics in 2016, many Chicagoans answer “No We Don’t”.

That plan, however, may change. Obama’s advisers are keeping their options open, and dispatched an advance team to Copenhagen in case he does decide stop by next Friday after all.

In the meantime, Obama has written a letter to the IOC promising that the US would “welcome the world with open arms” if Chicago were selected. Plus he’s sending his wife, First Lady Michelle, to work the room in his absence. Oprah Winfrey is coming along too, by the way.

Truth is, Chicago will probably need more than the US President in Copenhagen next Friday to save their Olympic bid. The three other bidding cities appear to have a little more going for them; Madrid and Tokyo look more reliable, and Rio de Janeiro looks, well, more enjoyable. No one really knows how the 107 IOC members will vote next Friday, but for what it’s worth, my vote goes to Rio.

Still, should Obama make it to Copenhagen, his presence can’t be underestimated. Four years ago, Paris was fancied to get the nod for the 2012 Olympics ahead of London, Madrid, Moscow and New York – before British Prime Minister Tony Blair was the only leader of the five candidate countries to lobby the IOC session personally in Singapore, and we all know what happened next (London beat Paris by four votes).

IOC president Jacques Rogge says the 2016 vote should be equally close: “I see really no favourite. I think it’s going to be a very close vote. There is no bid that is lagging behind. All the scenarios are possible.”

It used to be that the city which offered the best bribes won the vote (Atlanta 1996, Salt Lake City 2002, etc) but these days it’s a lot more ethical. In fact, the IOC members are no longer allowed visit the bid cities, and instead the IOC send their 13-member Evaluation Commission. They spent four days in each of the bid cities back in April and May, and on September 2nd released their 98-page evaluation report. This doesn’t rank or grade the candidates, but rather assesses technical criteria such as venues, budgets, transportation plans, accommodation, security and public support.

The report may provide a guide for which way the IOC vote next Friday, but a lot can change on the day itself. Each city makes a final presentation which can swing the thing, and many IOC members still vote for individual reasons, including geopolitical factors. Plus the winning city is only decided after a round of votes, by secret ballot; each time a city with the fewest votes is eliminated, until a city has the majority of the votes. A lot depends on how the eliminated cities row behind those still left in.

It helps, however, if your country’s leader is in town. Spanish King Juan Carlos will be in Copenhagen, and the Madrid bid is impressive. They’re promising the “Games with the Human Touch”, and they have huge public support. But from the beginning, the Madrid bid has had one big weakness: it is located in Europe, and it’s unlikely the IOC would choose another European host right after London.

Tokyo have the backing of Japan’s new Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama, although, like Obama, he’s unlikely to travel, and likewise has sent a letter of support.

It’s Tokyo’s first Olympic bid since hosting the Games in 1964, and with the motto “Uniting Our Worlds” have presented an appealing and compact city-centre venue plan. But the same way Madrid could be hampered by being so close to London, it’s likely the IOC will feel Tokyo is still too close to Beijing.

Chicago has a history of failed Olympic bids, losing out in 1952 and 1956, and hasn’t had the best of bids this time either, particularly in budgetary terms. They’ve also had to change their motto to “Let Friendship Shine” after their original one, “Stir the Soul”, translated in several languages as “Stir Your Insides”.

If Obama does show up in Copenhagen next Friday then it can’t be discounted, but many IOC members will recall the transport disaster that unfolded in Atlanta and fear Chicago could be as bad.

So to Rio – the sentimental and geographical favourite given their wish of staging the Olympics in South America for the first time. Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva has been campaigning hard for the IOC vote, and he’ll be in Copenhagen next Friday looking to seal the deal. He has every chance. The language used in Rio’s evaluation summary seemed to favour its bid, and as Silva has been pointing out, “it’s not a competition that can be only for the rich or high society”.

Rio is not only claiming great venues, but according to Forbes is the happiest city in the world. The IOC pointed out a potential conflict with Brazil staging the 2014 World Cup, but Rio reckons it’s a great idea to have both events with two years apart. Hard to argue with that one.

Unlike Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo, Rio is the one city bidding for the 2016 Olympics


http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/...255283654.html

_________________________________________________________________

RIO 2016
Live Your Passion !!
www.rio2016.com.br
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Old September 26th, 2009, 04:52 PM   #5653
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Old September 26th, 2009, 05:04 PM   #5654
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Brazil Cites Rio's Poor in Bid to Host Olympics Digg



By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN - THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

In an effort to bolster Brazil's bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics, President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva took an unusual approach. Speaking to reporters in New York, the populist president made an emotional appeal to have the Games in Rio de Janeiro so the event can be experienced by his country's poor.

"I believe the Olympic Games are not only a privilege for rich countries," he said.

The International Olympic Committee meets next week to select the 2016 host city at a meeting in Copenhagen.


Brazil's President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva appeared in New York to push for Rio De Janeiro's hosting of the 2016 Olympic Games.
The campaigns by the four bid cities, Rio, Chicago, Tokyo and Madrid, are heating up. Mr. da Silva has already approved some $240 billion in funding for the Games and offered the federal government's financial guarantee to cover shortfalls in the organizing committee's budget. That, combined with his argument that South America deserves an opportunity to host the event, makes Brazil a formidable foe.

This month, Brazil's bid received high praise in an IOC report on the technical qualities of all of the candidates' proposals, including transportation, financing, security and the competition venues.

"Are the Olympic Games a sports event where only rich countries have the right, or is it another thing?" Mr. da Silva said. "It can't be a European or an American Olympic Games. It has to be a world Olympic Games."

President da Silva is planning to attend next week's meeting in Denmark, as are the heads of state from Spain and Japan. Ever since Britain's Tony Blair helped to win the 2012 Olympics for London, personally lobbying IOC members in the days before the vote in Singapore in 2005, heads of state have become increasingly active in Olympic politics. In 2007, Vladimir Putin led the successful charge for Sochi, Russia, to host the 2014 Winter Games.

President Barack Obama is staying home to focus on health-care reform, but he is sending two powerful Chicagoans on his behalf -- first lady Michelle Obama, and one of his closest advisers, Valerie Jarrett. President Obama has taped several video messages on behalf of Chicago, written letters to IOC members, and met with international sports officials. Last week he made the case for Chicago, the city he calls home, in a special White House Olympic ceremony, with his comments aimed directly at any remaining undecided voters.

"Americans, like Chicagoans -- we don't like to make small plans," President Obama said. "We want to dream big and reach high. We hope deeply. We want these Games. And if you choose Chicago, I promise you this: Chicago will make America proud, and America will make the world proud."

For months, the battle for the 2016 Olympics has been widely considered a two-horse race between Rio and Chicago. Both cities have put forward compact bids that make use of numerous existing facilities and are centered on their waterfronts. Tokyo and Madrid have geographical obstacles to overcome, because the IOC usually prefers to rotate the Olympics to different areas of the world. The most recent Summer Games were held in Beijing in 2008, and the 2012 Games will be in London.

Chicago -- like any Olympics held in the U.S. -- offers direct access to the most major companies, which would be more likely to invest in a domestic Olympics. But the city's chances could be hurt by the U.S. Olympic Committee's fights with the IOC over financial matters in the past year, as well as the inability of the federal government to offer a financial guarantee for the Olympics.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125367059123032815.html


_________________________________________________________________

RIO 2016
Live Your Passion !!
(Venues) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrcYB...eature=related

Last edited by JR Nazareth; September 26th, 2009 at 05:11 PM.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 05:10 PM   #5655
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VERY FUNNY

THIS IS FOOTBALL CREATIVITY ....
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Old September 26th, 2009, 06:20 PM   #5656
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"IOC insiders" said Obama could sway votes too, I don't believe Brazil has any real advantage in this vote. I still think it's clear Chicago is probably going to win.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 07:39 PM   #5657
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Seats in Olympic stadium may convert to wheelchairs

September 26, 2009
BY LISA DONOVAN Staff Reporter/[email protected]

Chicago's plans for the Olympic Stadium -- should the city be named the host of the 2016 Summer Games next week -- could make it one of the more "handicapped-friendly'' venues ever built.

Of course, the stadium will be fully accessible to the disabled. But beyond that, the city is working on design plans to convert up to 50,000 of the planned 80,000 seats at the temporary stadium into wheelchairs. The chairs could be donated to disabled people in developing countries.

"It addresses a social issue where we can make wheelchairs -- privately funded -- available to people around the world with disabilities,'' said Chicago 2016 bid CEO Patrick Ryan. "There are still people around the world who still have to drag themselves because they don't have wheelchairs."

The conversion of the seats is possible because the plan is to collapse the stadium after the Games into a much smaller amphitheater in Washington Park on the South Side, leaving potentially tens of thousands of seats that could be put to other uses.

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/olymp...-Oly26.article
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Old September 26th, 2009, 09:23 PM   #5658
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Ohh, that's very logic! Look at how things have been goin' on til now, that indicates they'll remain this way forever

Are you sure you understand the true definition of LOGIC? Please, don't use widely employed terms that way, it might lead to misunderstandment...

So, in your concept, the ONLY variable ever evaluated by the delegates is "money"?? What is this, I though the historical materialism had died with Marx

Some thing simply can't be quantified and capitalized. Excitement is one of them, otherwise Tokyo would be FAR more eligible to win the dispute, being that they're the world's second richest country and haven't seen an OG for half a century...

If money is all that matters in the dispute, why don't make ALL the Olympics in the US? It's by far the biggest consuming market in the world, significantly bigger than the own EU!

Summing it all up - no, there's no "logic" in your statement, but, purely, a matter of "guess"...
You really shouldn't be so dogmatic. Btw Nagano, Japan hosted the 1998 Winter Olympics.......... And the EU has a higher GDP than the US.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 09:42 PM   #5659
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You really shouldn't be so dogmatic. Btw Nagano, Japan hosted the 1998 Winter Olympics.......... And the EU has a higher GDP than the US.
It deppends on what criteria we apply, besides, GDP and cosuming power are different grandeures.
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1 ∀x∀y[∀z(z∈x⇔z∈y)⇒x=y] ____2 ∀x[∃a(a∈x)⇒∃y(y∈x∧¬∃z(z∈y∧z∈x))] ____3 ∀x∀w_1∀w_2...∀w_n∃y∀x[x∈y⇔(x∈z∧∅)]
4 ∀x∀y∃z(x∈z∧y∈z) ____5 ∀F∃A∀Y∀x[(x∈Y∧Y∈F)⇒x∈A] ____6 ∀x∀w_1∀w_2...∀w_n[∀x(x∈A⇒∃!y∅)⇒∃B∀x(x∈A⇒∃y(y∈B∧∅))]
7 ∃X[∅∈X∧∀y(y∈X⇒S(y)∈X)] ____8 ∀x∃Q(x)∀z[z⊆x⇒z∈Q(x)] ____9 ∀X∃R(R well-orders X)
10 V=ULTIMATE L
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Old September 26th, 2009, 09:44 PM   #5660
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It deppends on what criteria we apply, besides, GDP and cosuming power are different grandeures.
Consumption is factored in to how GDP is calculated.
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