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View Poll Results: host city of Olympics 2012
London, UK 280 25.23%
Madrid, Spain 342 30.81%
Moscow, Russia 90 8.11%
New York, USA 206 18.56%
Paris, France 192 17.30%
Voters: 1110. You may not vote on this poll

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Old September 30th, 2009, 08:00 AM   #5941
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I believe in Brazil
I believe in Rio
Hope to be there on 2016
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Old September 30th, 2009, 08:03 AM   #5942
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Having lived in Chicago for 8 years up until a few months ago, I think that Chicago is an incredible city and would be very happy for them if they were to win the Olympics (and they seem like they have a very good shot). At the same time, I've heard good things about Rio as well, and it looks like they have a pretty strong bid - and they definitely have a very good shot themselves. Either city would be very deserving of a victory, so any comments from either Chicago or Rio detractors, saying that the city would be a very poor choice, just seem to be a tad bit silly to me.

Good luck to all cities involved!
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Old September 30th, 2009, 10:50 AM   #5943
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Seriously i want Tokyo 2 win the bid but i know it will not so if it doesnt i would really go for Rio De Janerio
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Old September 30th, 2009, 01:44 PM   #5944
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For Brazil, Olympic Bid Is About Global Role

Lalo de Almeida for The New York Times


Officials in Rio de Janeiro say winning the Olympics would be a transformational moment for Brazil. Above, the João Havelange Olympic Stadium, built in 2007.

Published: September 27, 2009

RIO DE JANEIRO — On shimmering Copacabana beach, where Rio’s body-conscious residents play volleyball and soccer, giant screens are being readied for a live broadcast of the vote that will determine whether this city will make history by becoming the first South American city ever to host the Olympic Games.

A sign in Copacabana showed the support of Rio’s residents to be the first South American city ever to host the Games.

On the streets and on the lips of radio and television broadcasters, Brazilians are abuzz with Olympics talk, and there is the distinct sense that this famous party city is ready to explode on Friday with a delirium rivaling its famed New Year’s and Carnaval celebrations if the vote for the 2016 Games goes Rio’s way.

Leaders here say winning the Olympics would be a transformational moment for Brazil, an affirmation of its rising global importance and a shot in the arm to the self-esteem of Cariocas, Rio’s residents, 85 percent of whom supported the Olympic bid in a recent poll by the International Olympic Committee.

“It would be overwhelming for our city, for our citizens and for Brazil as a whole,” said Carlos Osorio, the secretary general of Rio’s Olympic bid committee.

While three other finalists — Chicago, Madrid and Tokyo — have also mounted strong bids, Rio has drawn support outside of Brazil’s borders. President Nicolas Sarkozy of France, who has been negotiating military deals with Brazil, said he supported Rio’s bid “100 percent.” King Juan Carlos of Spain has said he will throw his support behind Rio if Madrid is eliminated in the first round of voting.

And some International Olympic Committee members have been reported to be enamored of the idea of correcting the Games’ historic neglect of South America.

Brazilians also believe they have an edge in the presidential sweepstakes. While President Obama, a longtime Chicago resident, has supported his city’s bid, he has said he will not attend the vote in Copenhagen, citing the pressing demands of health care reform. His wife, Michelle, a Chicago native, will be there instead.

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva of Brazil, on the other hand, has thrown himself behind Rio’s bid and said he would definitely make the trip to Copenhagen.

He has lobbied I.O.C. members wherever he could and called Mr. Osorio and others on Brazil’s bid committee for regular updates.

He attended the opening ceremonies of the Summer Games last year in Beijing and hosted a dinner for Olympic committee members there. He stayed an extra day in London after the Group of 20 meetings in April to tour the Olympic Park being readied for the 2012 Games.

The vote of some 100 committee members could stamp an exclamation point on his legacy as one of Brazil’s most popular presidents this century, and pave the road for his return to power in 2014, political analysts said.

On the other hand, Brazil’s ascent as a world-class sports site is a mixed blessing. Brazil will host the soccer World Cup in 2014 and already has projects under way to renovate its international airports in Rio and São Paulo, and build a high-speed rail system between the two cities in preparation for the event, points that work in Rio’s favor.

But its hosting of the Pan-American Games in 2007 might not. Rio politicians promised a host of urban infrastructure projects for the games, including a new metro line, that were not completed.

Mayor Eduardo Paes, who was Rio’s sports secretary during the Pan-American Games but was not involved in the original bid, acknowledged that officials over-promised. “It is obvious that the proposal contained exaggerations that clearly could not be fulfilled,” he said.

But he said this time Rio would deliver.

Rio is seeking to become the next Barcelona, Spain, a city that used the 1992 Olympic Games to improve its infrastructure and transform itself into a more popular destination for tourism and international events. Officials here say a Rio Olympics could help broaden the Games’ appeal to a wider and more youthful South American audience, while stamping Rio and Brazil with a seal of international approval.

“Rio has a lot to win from the Games,” Mr. Paes said. “And the Olympic movement has a lot to win from Rio as well.”

In the past, the I.O.C. has bestowed its seal of approval on uncharted regions at propitious times in their histories. Tokyo won the 1964 Games as Japan was still emerging from the shadow of the Second World War and the country’s economy was taking off. Seoul’s 1988 Games helped promote “brand Korea,” while Chinese officials originally sought the 2008 Beijing Games to escape their global isolation.

For Brazil, which has bid three times before — Rio twice and Brasília once — Friday’s vote comes after several years of economic growth and the nation’s emergence as the continent’s business and diplomatic leader. The Olympics, Mr. Osorio said, would have “a clear alignment with the country’s long-term strategy of presenting itself in the world.”

For Rio, the Olympics could lift a city that for all its natural beauty and touristic charm has been struggling to redefine itself since it was supplanted by Brasília as the country’s capital in 1960. In recent decades, banks and some of its more talented professionals have been lured to the growing megalopolis of São Paulo. Rio developed a reputation as decadent and crime-ridden.

“Rio is needing to reinforce its self-esteem,” said Ruy Castro, a Brazilian author who wrote a book about Rio. But, he said, recently Rio has been on a roll, noting that the city has been chosen as the location of a Woody Allen movie and that it was named the world’s happiest city by Forbes magazine.

Happiness, in fact, is part of Rio’s pitch.

The city has promised a private beach for the athletes, in front of a nature reserve in Barra da Tijuca that, in true Rio spirit, would be available at all hours. The Olympic Village would feature a Rua Carioca, a typical Rio street with cafes, bars and the swaying sounds of samba and bossa nova.

If the athletes could vote, Mr. Osorio said, “it would be a landslide.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/28/wo.../28brazil.html
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Old September 30th, 2009, 01:58 PM   #5945
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Chicago is the boring choice for the 2016 Olympics - By Oliver Holt 30/09/2009

The presence of President Obama in Copenhagen may well win Chicago the 2016 Olympics at the IOC vote on Friday.

But the fact that Chicago needs Obama there in the first place tells you all you need to know.

Chicago is the boring choice. If the IOC wants to breathe new life into the movement, it will go for Rio de Janeiro.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/more-s...5875-21711798/
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Old September 30th, 2009, 02:10 PM   #5946
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History or no mystery? IOC has a statement to make

By NANCY ARMOUR (AP) – 13 hours ago

COPENHAGEN — Rio or Chicago? Risk vs. reliable.

For the International Olympic Committee, the biggest decision in choosing the city to host the 2016 Games is what statement it wants to send the world.

Does it make the bold, transformational choice of Rio de Janeiro, giving the Olympics to South America for the first time? Or does it play it safe and head for the familiar shores of the United States and, perhaps, a more lucrative games?

"Policy wise, the IOC has to decide if we're ready to go to a new continent," longtime IOC member Dick Pound said recently. "That's the biggest paradigm shift. Is the time right?"

Rio certainly thinks so.

The city didn't even make the finals when it bid for the Olympics in 2004 and 2012. Now, however, Brazil has one of the world's largest economies and its international stature is growing. South America is also home to 400 million people, bid committee leader Carlos Arthur Nuzman said, a population that could ensure the Olympic movement's legacy for generations to come.

And, Rio leaders say, given any chance they get, it is time.

When Rio traveled to Switzerland in June to present its bid to IOC members, the highlight of its passionate appeal was a large map showing where all the Olympics have been held. Dots blanketed Europe, Asia and North America.

The entire South American continent was bare.

"The Olympic movement is a global movement, so it has to be global. It has to go to all the continents, all the countries, all the areas of the world," Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes said Tuesday. "We're pretty emotional here at this moment because we know it's a very important moment for a city that has a lot to give. It's going to change forever the Olympic movement."

IOC members acknowledge there is large appeal in going somewhere new. That Rio's plan is technically strong only strengthens its case, making it a slight favorite over Chicago ahead of Friday's vote.

Madrid and Tokyo both seem to have faded, done in largely by geography. Though the IOC doesn't have an official continental rotation, European cities are hosting the 2012 and '14 games, while last year's Beijing Olympics are still fresh in members' minds.

Of course, for all the handicapping, nothing is ever as certain as it seems.

The vagaries of the IOC's voting system make it that any of the four could go out in the first round, and ballrooms across the globe are littered with supposed favorites who didn't win the ultimate prize. In fact, the key to victory often depends on picking up those second- and third-choice votes.

The city receiving the fewest votes is eliminated after each round until one candidate has a majority. The vote is expected to go the maximum three rounds.

Rio also has to convince the IOC that it can pay for $11 billion worth of infrastructure projects and complete them on time — on top of staging the World Cup just two years earlier. Hosting the world's two largest sporting events back-to-back could prove to be a marketing challenge, with advertisers deciding they have the money for one or the other, not both.

Then again, FIFA's endorsement might be what's needed to convince IOC members that now is the right time.

"It's a big, sophisticated international federation, so maybe that's a signal," Pound said.

More like a loud alarm, Rio said.

"It's the absolute historical moment for our country, for our continent, for our state," said Sergio Cabral, governor of the state of Rio de Janeiro.

But what if it's not?

While Chicago doesn't have the international flair of, say, Los Angeles, New York or even San Francisco, it is an American bid and those are the ultimate security blanket for the IOC. Los Angeles, Atlanta and Salt Lake City all staged successful games that made money. Lots of it, in Los Angeles and Salt Lake.

Chicago may not have the architectural masterpieces that typically define a host city, but its plan to use city parks and existing or temporary venues also makes it less vulnerable to the massive cost overruns that London and Vancouver have seen. Its bid committee is run by insurance magnate Pat Ryan, who didn't get rich by making bad decisions, and is filled with people who worked on the Sydney and Salt Lake games.

And by returning to the United States for its first Summer Games since 1996, the IOC will have an attractive property for American advertisers and broadcasters. That's no small thing, considering the IOC's largest chunk of revenue comes from its $2.2 billion deal with NBC to broadcast the 2010 and 2012 Olympics. Negotiations for the U.S. TV rights to the 2014 and 2016 games won't begin until after the vote, and the IOC can expect that a Chicago games will increase both the number of bids and dollar amounts attached to them.

There is also the Obama factor.

President Barack Obama is a popular figure overseas, an adopted son of Chicago and an ardent supporter of the city's bid and the Olympic movement. So much so he is taking a few hours away from all-important health care reform to come to Copenhagen for Chicago's final presentation, the first sitting U.S. president to personally lobby the IOC at a host city vote.

Although Ryan is thrilled Obama will be part of the final presentation, he cautions that it isn't a contest of heads of state. "This is really about cities that would be the best host city for the games," Ryan said.

Obama is just one of four big name leaders being brought in by the cities. Rio will have Brazil President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, Madrid will have King Juan Carlos, and Japan will have new Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama.

"We believe we can make a great impact on the future of the Olympics," said David Robinson, one of the original Dream Teamers. "That's no comment against the other great cities. We just feel like we bring some great things to the table."

Copyright © 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090930/...y2016_olympics
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Old September 30th, 2009, 02:15 PM   #5947
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I think 'Rio' is acting as if it was the elected city, i don't like this kind of feeling, Rio's bid is not better than the other ones, the only thing about its Bid is the emotional thing, and this is not enough to hold the games. The IOC members should be more impartials and just decide thinking on the technical informs
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Old September 30th, 2009, 02:19 PM   #5948
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MGM View Post
The presence of President Obama in Copenhagen may well win Chicago the 2016 Olympics at the IOC vote on Friday.

But the fact that Chicago needs Obama there in the first place tells you all you need to know.

Chicago is the boring choice. If the IOC wants to breathe new life into the movement, it will go for Rio de Janeiro.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/more-s...5875-21711798/
He's there for 5 hours. The President of Brazil is there for a week. By the Mirror's weird logic that would tell you all you need to know about Rio's bid, wouldn't it? It would, by their logic, be far more boring than Chicago's bid!
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Old September 30th, 2009, 03:57 PM   #5949
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I still think Chicago is going to win this, their bid is too strong to be turned down by the IOC.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:00 PM   #5950
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Everyone said that about Paris four years ago Onn. Anything could happen tomorrow.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:01 PM   #5951
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He's there for 5 hours. The President of Brazil is there for a week. By the Mirror's weird logic that would tell you all you need to know about Rio's bid, wouldn't it? It would, by their logic, be far more boring than Chicago's bid!
Chicago is not boring at all. Anyone who says that has clearly never been to the city. But that's okay, let them think that way. They can come and be blown away.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:02 PM   #5952
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Everyone said that about Paris four years ago Onn. Anything could happen tomorrow.
Yeah, but Paris was the favorite going into the vote. And an American Olympics would provide much needed revenue for the IOC. I don't think they have much of a choice here.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:06 PM   #5953
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The danger in this is that if people go for the whole "emotional/vibrant/exotic" vote, you run the big risk of another 2004 in Athens, which was a total mess.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:07 PM   #5954
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Chicago is not boring at all. Anyone who says that has clearly never been to the city. But that's okay, let them think that way. They can come and be blown away.
I like how that article said Chicago lacks the proper architecture to host the games. Fools is say, damn fools.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:08 PM   #5955
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Quote:
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He's there for 5 hours. The President of Brazil is there for a week. By the Mirror's weird logic that would tell you all you need to know about Rio's bid, wouldn't it? It would, by their logic, be far more boring than Chicago's bid!
You have no idea the sacrifices he's making to be there for those five hours.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:13 PM   #5956
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There's such a thing as a Gay Games?

Is it affiliated with the IOC?

What are you suggesting here? I am gay, and I resent any form of condescension about what gays are supposed to or not supposed to be. Is Rio cosmopolitan enough in their social attitudes to host an international event such as the Olympics? I should hope so.

Last edited by tpe; September 30th, 2009 at 04:19 PM.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:15 PM   #5957
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The danger in this is that if people go for the whole "emotional/vibrant/exotic" vote, you run the big risk of another 2004 in Athens, which was a total mess.
The legacy is a mess. The actual Olympics and opening ceremony were stellar. The closing ceremony wasn't exciting at all (for me) but it was still well executed.
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Old September 30th, 2009, 04:57 PM   #5958
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total agree with you. Athens 2004 were great. atlanta was a total mess
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Old September 30th, 2009, 05:00 PM   #5959
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total agree with you. Athens 2004 were great. atlanta was a total mess
what was a mess about Atlanta besides the awkward looking stadium?
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Old September 30th, 2009, 06:05 PM   #5960
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Madrid 2016 official: Rio has worst Olympics bid

MADRID (AP) — A Madrid 2016 Olympics bid official has reportedly labeled rival Rio de Janeiro's bid the "worst" of the four cities competing for the right to host the games.

Spanish Olympic Committee vice president Jose Maria Odriozola called Rio "the worst bid" according to Spanish news agency Efe on Wednesday.

Odriozola said Rio's standing as one of the favorites for Friday's vote comes down to marketing and sentimentality and security remains an issue.

"At this point, the IOC is not going to risk it and take the Games to a site where it doesn't have total confidence that it can be done well," said Odriozola, who is also president of the Spanish athletics federation.


Madrid is also competing against Chicago and Tokyo for the right to host the 2016 Summer Games.

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/olymp...16501805_x.htm
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