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Old October 21st, 2010, 07:29 PM   #61
cameronpaul
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Originally Posted by Chadoh25 View Post
New Center, West Grand Avenue









































I think this beautiful building featured above and by the looks of it recently restored, is the old headquarters of General Motors, constructed c.1920.
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Old October 21st, 2010, 09:44 PM   #62
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very nice city.
do you have some shots of that glassy GM Hq and the neighborhood?
anyways, thanks Chadoh for this wonderful photo tour.
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Old October 21st, 2010, 10:07 PM   #63
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Detroit is a city from a different era. It's just so hauntingly beautiful.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 12:04 AM   #64
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Thanks guys! And folks, PLEASE DO NOT put EVERY photo in your quotes! It makes things unnecessarily long and makes the entire page load much slower! Thank You

Griswold Street















West Congress Street



Inside the Gaurdian building





























More to come later....
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 07:42 AM   #65
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Thanks for the tour Chadoh25. Your recent comments make you sound like you've been in Detroit, lol.

To the outsiders: you can't really fully understand the scale of devastation through pictures. The city is missing very basic services, and in many parts there is nothing left to grow an economy on. On top of that, the racial tensions are still out of control there. (Look up Alter Rd, South of Jefferson. They've built a moat and a very tall fence between the City of Detroit and the rich white suburb of Grosse Point Farms.)

That said, Detroit is showing signs of new life. Campus Martius is a very pleasent, albeit small, place. New Center is also a great part of town. But for the rest of the city, there's not much hope.

Chadoh25, you're doing a fantastic job of taking pictures of the remaining beautiful places there. Before you leave town, you should take a trip up to the suburbs along Woodward. Ferndale, Royal Oak, and Birmingham are all beautiful places.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 07:24 PM   #66
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Thanks for the tour Chadoh25. Your recent comments make you sound like you've been in Detroit, lol.

To the outsiders: you can't really fully understand the scale of devastation through pictures. The city is missing very basic services, and in many parts there is nothing left to grow an economy on. On top of that, the racial tensions are still out of control there. (Look up Alter Rd, South of Jefferson. They've built a moat and a very tall fence between the City of Detroit and the rich white suburb of Grosse Point Farms.)

That said, Detroit is showing signs of new life. Campus Martius is a very pleasent, albeit small, place. New Center is also a great part of town. But for the rest of the city, there's not much hope.

Chadoh25, you're doing a fantastic job of taking pictures of the remaining beautiful places there. Before you leave town, you should take a trip up to the suburbs along Woodward. Ferndale, Royal Oak, and Birmingham are all beautiful places.
Thanks for taking the time to look at my photos. I'm happy to hear you're enjoying my little tour. I very much enjoyed exploring the city and seeing the good and the bad of Detroit. Actually, I did get a chance to see both Ferndale and Royal Oak. When I went up the second time I had a date that night and he and I went through both cities. I found both to be very nice. Ferndale gave me a "Short North" vibe!
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 08:40 PM   #67
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I love Detroit. I don't know why, but this decadence makes me with a strange melancolic feeling, a desire to have lived 60 years ago and seen the fantastic and boosting city is was.

I still would like to live there today, buy one of these decadent buildings and restore it to it's past glory. Why don't Detroit invest in the IT field? IT industries just needs a place, energy and internet to work. I would love to work in one of these nice buildings and buy a old house near job.

Well I really hope Detroit recover it's past glory, but as seen it's very hard.

BTW, Detroit is on my wishcities to travel
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 08:50 PM   #68
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Great shots there of Detroit, a wonderful collection of skyscrapers and architecture for sure! Just a shame about the lack of pedestrians.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 11:03 PM   #69
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Congress Street





Intersection of Congress and Shelby Street. I LOVE this building!





Walking up Shelby


















This was my FB pic for awhile!



















Back to Woodward









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Old October 23rd, 2010, 12:14 AM   #70
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so nice to see that so much great architecture has survived, reminds me of Buffalo only grander.
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Old October 24th, 2010, 04:07 AM   #71
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Thanks for stopping by everyone. I greatly appreciate it! This will be the last big set of Downtown photos. Next stop, Brush Park!



Campus Martius/ John F. Kennedy Square

















Cadillac Square









Wayne County building













Cadillac Square Apartments! I could live there!









Heading down Woodward Avenue to Brush Park.


Last edited by Chadoh25; October 24th, 2010 at 04:13 AM.
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Old October 25th, 2010, 04:59 AM   #72
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Brush Park

Brush Park Historic District is a 24 block neighborhood located within Midtown Detroit, Michigan and designated by the city. It is bounded by Mack on the north, Woodward Avenue on the west, Beaubien on the east, and the Fisher freeway on the south. The neighborhood is experiencing restorations of its historic Gilded Age Victorian style homes and luring new residents.

Woodward East Historic District

The Woodward East Historic District is a smaller historic district, recognized by the National Register of Historic Places, which is completely encompassed by the larger Brush Park neighborhood. The Woodward East Historic District is located on Alfred, Edmund, and Watson Streets from Brush Street to John R Street in Detroit, Michigan. Woodward East is particularly known for the High Victorian style residences constructed Detroit's wealthiest citizens. Although many of the once-grand houses have been demolished in recent years, those remaining exhibit a variety of Victorian style subtypes and architectural details, including Second Empire slate Mansard roofs, Romanesque columns and classical dentiled cornices.

Beginning in the 1850s, entrepreneur Edmund Brush, son of the city's second mayor from its first incorporation, began developing his family's property, located conveniently close to downtown, into a neighborhood for Detroit's elite citizens. Homes were built in Brush Park beginning in the 1850s and peaking in the 1870s and 1880s; one of the last homes built was constructed in 1906 by architect Albert Kahn for his personal use. Kahn lived in this home until his death in 1942, after which it was obtained by the Detroit Urban League, which still uses it today. Other early residents of Brush Park included lumber baron David Whitney Jr., his daughter Grace Whitney Evans, Joseph L. Hudson, founder of the eponymous department store, lumber baron Lucien Moore, banker Frederick Butler, merchant John P. Fiske, Dime Savings Bank founder William Livingston, and dry goods manufacturer Ransom Gillis. In the late 19th century, the Brush Park neighborhood became known as the "Little Paris of the Midwest."

William Livingstone House on Eliot Street, constructed in 1893, was among the oldest historic properties that had fallen into decay; it was demolished September 15, 2007. Architects who designed these mansions included Henry T. Brush, George D. Mason, George W. Nettleton, and Albert Kahn. The French Renaissance style William Livingston House (1892–93) at 294 Elliot was Albert Kahn's first commission. Livingston founded the Dime Savings Bank. Artist Lowell Bioleau commorated the William Livingston House in a painting entitled Open House which he unveiled the day of its demolition September 15, 2007, underscoring preservationist efforts. As of 2001, about 154 original structures remained in the area. During the 19th century, around 300 homes were built in Brush Park, including 70 Victorian mansions. However, the neighborhood began to decline in the late 19th and early 20th century, when the advent of streetcars and then automobiles allowed prosperous citizens to live further from downtown. Early residents moved out, notably to up-and-coming neighborhoods such as Indian Village and Boston-Edison, and the neighborhood became less fashionable. During the Great Depression, many of the older mansions were subdivided into apartments, and as houses aged in the post World War II era, some became unoccupied and fell into disrepair.

Brush Park's revival began in the 1990s and has accelerated recently. A number of the older mansions have been restored, and more have been stabilized. In addition, new condominiums have been built in the southern part of Brush Park, near the Fisher Freeway. Brush Park Historic District's general boundaries are Woodward Avenue, Mack, Beaubien, and the Fisher Freeway.


Almund Place



Originally owned by lumber baron Lucien Moore, 104 Edmund Place, a French Renaissance Gothic Revival style mansion restored in 2006, has 7,000 sq ft (650 m2). The Lucien Moore House restoration was featured December 27, 2005 by HGTV's restore America Initiative in partnership with the National Trust for Historic Preservation

John R Street



Almund Place









Left to Right. John P. Fiske, was a Detroit merchant of china and crockery. The house is within the Woodward East Historic District. Originally owned by George Ladve, 269 Edmund Pl., an Eastlake Victorian style mansion built in 1882 and restored in 2008, contains 7,400 sq ft (690 m2). Ladve had owned a carpet and upholstery company. In the late 1890s, the Frohlich family added a music room. Frohlich was among the original philanthropists to the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Built in 1882, the Frederick Butler House at 291 Edmund Place is a French Renaissance Second Empire style mansion with a Mansard roof which was restored in 2006 and contains 8,400 sq ft (780 m2). It is located near Edmund Pl. and Brush St. within the Woodward East Historic District. The original ownwer, Frederick Butler was a banker.









Alfred Street













Also known as the Joseph Lothian Hudson House or the Grace Whitney Evans House. The house was a gift from David Whitney Jr. to his daughter Grace upon her marriage to John Evans in 1872. It later became the J.L. Hudson family residence. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places



The French Renaissance, Second Empire style, Elisha Taylor House with its mansard roof was built for William H. Craig, a Detroit land speculator. In 1875, Craig sold the house to attorney Elisha Taylor. Taylor was a Detroit attorney who held many offices during his career, including City Attorney, assistant Michigan Attorney General from 1837 to 1841, and Circuit Court Commissioner from 1846 to 1854. The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



Woodward Avenue







First Unitarian Church of Detroit

Edmund Place



Ecumenical Theological Seminary







John R Street





Adelaide Street



John R Street


Last edited by Chadoh25; November 7th, 2010 at 01:59 AM.
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Old November 3rd, 2010, 08:24 PM   #73
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Final set from Downtown

Ren Center













Looking across the River to Canada







Capital Square









Next stop, Boston-Edison and the Henry Ford House.
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Old November 5th, 2010, 04:29 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadoh25 View Post
Next stop, Boston-Edison and the Henry Ford House.
Where are the pics of Boston-Edison?

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Old November 5th, 2010, 05:20 AM   #75
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great photo collection, great buildings and this is one great photo tour.
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Old November 7th, 2010, 01:04 AM   #76
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Boston-Edison

The Boston-Edison Historic District is a historic neighborhood located in the geographic center of Detroit, Michigan. It consists of over 900 homes built on four east/west streets: West Boston Boulevard, Chicago Boulevard, Longfellow Avenue, and Edison Avenue, stretching from Woodward Avenue on the east to Linwood Avenue on the west. It is one of the largest residential historic districts in the nation. It is surrounded by Sacred Heart Major Seminary to the west, the Arden Park-East Boston Historic District and the Cathedral of the Most Blessed Sacrament to the east, and the Atkinson Avenue Historic District to the south. The district was designated a Michigan State Historic Site in 1973 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.

Description

Boston-Edison remains a fashionable community. An substantial number of prominent Detroiters live in the neighborhood. Notable residents have included labor leader Walter P. Reuther, Rabbi Morris Adler, Detroit Tigers Harry Heilmann and Dizzy Trout, Michigan Supreme Court justices Franz C. Kuhn and Henry Butzel, U.S. Representative Vincent M. Brennan, and Michigan governor Harry Kelly. Other notable residents of the neighborhood have included boxer Joe Louis, druggist Sidney Barthwell, Congressman Charles C. Diggs, Jr., Motown record label owner Berry Gordy, Detroit Tiger Willie Horton, and dentist and pioneering WCHB radio station owner Wendell F. Cox.

The District boasts the oldest continuous neighborhood association in the City, the Historic Boston-Edison Association, which was founded in 1921. The District received historic designation from the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office in 1973, the Detroit Historic District Commission in 1974, and the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Census data from 2000 (which includes the surrounding streets of Atkinson, Clairmount, and Glynn Court) show Boston-Edison has both African-American and white residents. The homes are owned by people from diverse occupations and professions.

Original residents

One of the earliest residents of the Boston-Edison neighborhood, Henry Ford, was also one of the most well-known. In 1907, Ford had a brick and limestone Italian Renaissance Revival residence built at the corner of Edison and Second for a cost $483,253. Henry and his wife, Clara, moved in the next year, living in the neighborhood until 1915, when they relocated to Fair Lane, their estate in Dearborn. During the time that Ford lived in Boston-Edison, his introduction of the Model T, mass production methods, and wage-price theories revolutionized American industry. Above the garage (behind the house), Henry built a machine shop for his son Edsel to support and encourage Edsel's interest in automobile design. A State of Michigan Historical Marker, describing the history and significance of the home, is located on the front lawn.

Henry Ford was only the first of many automotive pioneers to live in the Boston-Edison community. Ford's early business partners and Ford Motor Company stockholders James Couzens and Horace Rackham also built homes near Ford's in Boston-Edison. (Two other Ford stockholders, John Dodge, and Alexander Y. Malcomson, lived in the adjoining Arden Park-East Boston neighborhood.) They were followed by other early and important Ford collaborators such as Peter E. Martin, C. Harold Wills, and Clarence W. Avery. In addition, other early automobile pioneers such as Walter Briggs, Sr. of Briggs Manufacturing Co, four of the Fisher brothers (of Fisher Body), Charles Lambert of Regal Motor Car Co., John W. Drake of Hupp Motor Car Co., and William E. Metzger of Cadillac and E-M-F likewise built homes in Boston-Edison.

Other prominent Detroit businessmen lived in Boston-Edison during the early years of the neighborhood, including Sebastian S. Kresge (founder of the S.S. Kresge Company—later Kmart), Benjamin Siegel (founder of a major early clothing store), and J. L. Webber (nephew of J. L. Hudson). Other notable early residents included conductor Ossip Gabrilowitsch and his wife Clara Clemens, Detroit Tigers owner Frank Navin, Detroit Tigers player Ty Cobb (on nearby Atkinson Avenue at Third), historian Clarence M. Burton, and Rabbi Leo M. Franklin.

During the early history of Boston-Edison, four factors influenced the character of the community. First was a tendency for employees and business associates to live in a cluster, as early associates of Henry Ford did. In addition, six employees of S.S. Kresge lived in the neighborhood. Secondly, was the tendency of several family members to live in close range. In addition to the four Fisher brothers (a fifth brother, Frederic, lived in the adjacent Arden Park-East Boston neighborhood), a number of Benjamin Siegel's relatives lived in the neighborhood, as did a number of Wagner family members (owners of Wagner's bakery). A third factor was the construction of Henry Ford Hospital in 1915, only a mile south of the neighborhood. Twenty-three physicians built homes in Boston-Edison.

History

The land now within the boundaries of Boston-Edison was first owned by John R. Williams (who was granted a single parcel in 1822) and Thomas Palmer (who was granted three parcels in 1828 and 1832). These original four grants were transferred from owner to owner over the next fifty years until they were obtained by the Joy family, the Newberry family, and Edward W. Voigt.

In 1891, Voigt, foreseeing the growth of Detroit northward, platted out the Voigt Park subdivision, consisting of seven east/west streets between Woodward and Hamilton—those being Calvert Avenue, Glynn Court, Schiller Esplanade, Shakespeare Esplanade, Longfellow Avenue, Edison Avenue, and Atkinson Avenue. Four of these streets—Schiller Esplanade (now Boston Boulevard), Shakespeare Esplanade (now Chicago Boulevard), Longfellow Avenue, and Edison Avenue—formed the Boston-Edison neighborhood. The location of the neighborhood park, originally to have been between Chicago and Boston Boulevards, was later changed to be situated between Longfellow and Edison Avenues.

Voigt Park subdivision was immediately incorporated into the City of Detroit. Voigt platted spacious lots and set building restrictions that established the unique character of the neighborhood. His vision was followed by Truman and John Newberry, who platted the West Boston Boulevard Subdivision between Hamilton and 12th Street (now "Rosa Parks Boulevard") in 1913. The subdivision included lots on West Boston, Chicago, Longfellow, and Edison, as well as on Atkinson to the south. In 1915, Henry B. Joy platted the Joy Farms Subdivision between 12th Street and Linwood. This subdivision included lots on the same seven streets originally platted by Voigt. Both of these subdivisions were annexed by the City of Detroit in 1915.

The first homes built in the Boston-Edison Historic District were occupied in 1905, with the majority of the homes built between 1905 and 1925. Each of the homes in the neighborhood is unique. Architectural styles represented include English Tudor revival, Roman and Greek Revival, French Provincial, Colonial Revival, Italian Renaissance, Prairie Style, and Vernacular. These homes range in size from modest two-story vernaculars to massive mansions set on sprawling grounds. Although the homes are unique in style, homes along the streetscape are generally uniform in roofline, scale, setback from the street, and in the use of stone, brick or wood construction. This uniformity creates a gracious suburban ambiance.


Henry Food Home










Last edited by Chadoh25; August 9th, 2012 at 07:02 AM.
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Old August 9th, 2012, 07:02 AM   #77
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Detriot. Summer 2012

Woodward Avenue



Capital Square.

Most of these buildinds are either being renovated or will be soon.






























more to come
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Old August 9th, 2012, 09:49 AM   #78
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thanks for the nice updates from Detroit....
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Old August 10th, 2012, 03:59 AM   #79
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Thanks!!
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Old August 10th, 2012, 03:59 AM   #80
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Detriot. Summer 2012















































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