daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 22nd, 2009, 06:14 PM   #481
Qwert
Moderator
 
Qwert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 12,416
Likes (Received): 2537

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoKo65 View Post
As far as I understood it, the Russians want to pay it.
First reports are talking about financing from Slovakian state budget and loans. That's however only hardly possible if we want to respect Maastricht criteria. I haven't seen any information about financing by EU, Russia or any other country.
Qwert no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 22nd, 2009, 06:27 PM   #482
gramercy
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,823
Likes (Received): 799

Why spend 5 bn USD on a 500 km long railroad parallelling an already existing railrod and on top of it not being able to use the third rail by anything else than intercontinental freight.

The more I hear of this the more I'm convinced this could be done much better for much less.



Does the fact that southern slovakia is mainly populated by hungarians filter into the northern choice for the route?
gramercy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2009, 06:37 PM   #483
JoKo65
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,111
Likes (Received): 86

Quote:
Originally Posted by gramercy View Post
Why spend 5 bn USD on a 500 km long railroad parallelling an already existing railrod and on top of it not being able to use the third rail by anything else than intercontinental freight.
[…]
As we discussed above, there will be no third rail.
__________________
L'Amerique? C'est l'évolution de la barbarie ŕ la décadence, sans toucher la culture.
JoKo65 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2009, 06:47 PM   #484
gramercy
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,823
Likes (Received): 799

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoKo65 View Post
As we discussed above, there will be no third rail.
I meant third railroad.
gramercy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 22nd, 2009, 11:30 PM   #485
Qwert
Moderator
 
Qwert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 12,416
Likes (Received): 2537

Quote:
Originally Posted by gramercy View Post
Why spend 5 bn USD on a 500 km long railroad parallelling an already existing railrod and on top of it not being able to use the third rail by anything else than intercontinental freight.

The more I hear of this the more I'm convinced this could be done much better for much less.
This is one of the main arguments against this railway. All the cargo can be transported to the border terminals or to Košice, transshipped there on trucks and normal gauge trains and sent to whole Europe. On the other hand freight railway connecting (when completely finished) Beijing and Paris could be pretty busy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gramercy View Post
Does the fact that southern slovakia is mainly populated by hungarians filter into the northern choice for the route?
Northern choice of what route? I doubt routing has to do anything with ethnicity of inhabitants along the railway.
Qwert no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2009, 06:32 AM   #486
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18218

Eurotunnel CEO: leisure traffic similar to 08
22 April 2009

PARIS (AP) - The head of Groupe Eurotunnel SA said Wednesday the English Channel tunnel operator is in "good health" and that the recession is having a limited impact on leisure travel.

CEO Jacques Gounon told The Associated Press that he doesn't expect a big fall this year in the number of leisure passengers shuttled on high-speed trains under the English Channel between London and Paris.

"People in times of crisis need to get away from it all," he said, noting traffic over the Easter holidays was similar to last year. "Passenger traffic will be roughly the same as last year or perhaps a little weaker."

Eurotunnel also has been coping with the aftermath of a devastating fire that broke out last year in one of the trains that whizz through the tunnel, forcing several months of partial closure.

Gounon said he expects "no or little financial consequences" from the fire, thanks to insurance payments of around euro200 million for repairs and lost business. The company already has received euro83 million, he said.

"Today, the crisis is hurting everyone and I am tempted to say that Eurotunnel will be one of those who gets through it the best," Gounon said in Paris. "We are in very good health today."

Until a restructuring deal arranged by Gounon was approved in 2007, Eurotunnel lurched from one debt crisis to another, dancing with bankruptcy.

The company has finally climbed out of the red, reporting a euro40 million ($50.46 million) net profit in 2008.

In the first quarter, when the tunnel was partially closed for eight of 13 weeks, revenue fell 23 percent to euro144.6 million ($188.82 million), including a euro29 million payment from insurers.

Eurotunnel reopened on Feb. 19, and Eurostar reintroduced a full timetable on Feb. 23.

Eurotunnel makes revenue from Eurostar, which pays to operate trains under the Channel, and from its own shuttles which transport cars, campervans, motorcycles, buses and trucks.

Eurostar said last week that that revenue declined 5.8 percent in the first quarter due to a slump in business travel, although leisure travel increased. Eurotunnel is unaffected by changes in ticket classes because Eurostar pays it a flat fee of euro18 per passenger as well as a fixed rate to operate the service, Gounon said.

Eurotunnel lost many of its truck customers when annual contracts were signed last year and won't be able to gauge the impact of recession on this business until the end of the year when new contracts are negotiated, Gounon said.

Shares closed Wednesday up 1.8 percent at euro3.87, roughly the level of the start of the year.

When the crisis is over, Gounon said he expects annual growth of around 2 to 3 percent in traffic volumes.

HSBC analyst Eric Lemarie said in an April 9 research note that he thinks Eurotunnel's share price reflects market expectations of an 18 percent fall in the traffic for Eurostar and its own shuttles this year.

He said this is "overly pessimistic," publishing his own "conservative" prediction of a 10 percent decline. He rates the stock overweight with a target price of euro5.50.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2009, 10:52 AM   #487
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18218

Channel Tunnel marks 15th anniversary - in black
5 May 2009

UNDER THE ENGLISH CHANNEL (AP) - After three years of sweat and toil, Philippe Cozette tunneled into history one wintry day in 1990, using a compressed air drill to power through the last chunk of chalk marl separating undersea tubes extending from the shores of Calais in France to the white cliffs of Dover in England.

When the Frenchman reached through the hole to shake hands with his English colleague Robert Graham Fagg on the other side, the two countries were physically linked for the first time since the last Ice Age.

"Welcome to France," Cozette said in English. "Bonjour, mon ami," responded Fagg, before exclaiming in a distinctly English accent: "Vive la France!"

The Channel Tunnel -- or Chunnel as it's affectionately known -- opened four years later on May 6, 1994. The world's longest undersea passageway stands on its 15th anniversary as a dazzling engineering feat that is finally turning a profit following years of crippling losses -- and, while tucked away out of sight, it has become a monument to the possibility of change: After centuries of rivalry and warfare, France and England have become partners in a successful enterprise that has changed the face of Europe.

"We don't have the same way of doing things, but little by little we got to understand each other," Cozette said, talking about the French and English work crews -- but making an observation that could very well apply to the two countries as well.

The French work teams were taught some English, Cozette said, and also given advice about the curious ways of their colleagues from across the Channel.

"We appreciate direct contact," he said. "The English don't. But little by little they learned to come and shake hands which is not at all natural for them. ... There has been a lot of patience and understanding on both sides."

Cozette's story in many ways reflects the ups and downs of the 32-mile (50 kilometer) long Chunnel itself.

He was able to make the transition from construction worker to engine driver when the Chunnel opened, but was laid off along with 900 others in 2005 when the tunnel operator was near financial ruin. He used his severance payment to set himself up as a taxi driver -- and Eurotunnel has hired him to chauffeur VIPs and shareholders to the anniversary festivities set for May 6.

Cozette may have lost his job, but he's still proud of the tunnel, an accomplishment he dreamed of when he was growing up in Calais, the French terminus, and looked toward the English coast some 20 miles (32 kilometers) away.

"When I look at the white cliffs of Dover, I think of the tunnel underneath," Cozette said wistfully.

Inside, the tunnel is a dark, silent and lifeless place. Even animals don't venture inside. An immigrant who entered from the French side in April was found dead just 5 miles (8 kilometers) from Calais.

When no train is zipping by, the only sign of life is the water that seeps through the chalk marl, leaving a white, salty dusting on the gray concrete. Fluorescent overhead lights dispel some of the gloom, illuminating miles (kilometers) of pipes and cables.

But the Chunnel has boosted economic life on both sides by improving trading links, galvanizing tourism, and also changing mentalities. Britons have cast aside their island mind-set to warmly embrace the chunnel, overcoming decades of resistance from British military officers who viewed the project as a national security breach that could tempt foreign invaders.

Once this belief faded, physical differences between the two national railway systems had to be worked out -- but those adjustments were minor compared to the mental and cultural changes required to make the old enemies partners.

"I like to say the English Channel is 20 miles (32 kilometers) wide and 1,000 years deep," said Stephen Clarke, the English author of "A Year in the Merde" and other best-sellers about French life.

"It shows how close and yet so far apart we are. The tunnel has scythed through all that, it's just become so easy to nip back and forth."

The two countries, Clarke points out, have been enemies far longer than they have been friends: "We battled each other for domination for so long it is as if we have a genetic allergy for each other."

"The Hundred Years War was a century where any English landowner or soldiers would come over to France to rape, pillage and steal and then go home with the profits. When the English came, it was time to hide your daughters and your house. So it's not surprising grudges were held."

He said the tunnel has become "a secret staircase" that has made it much easier for people to cross the Channel for a football game, a concert, a good meal, or in search of romance.

Now that it has become a reliable transport link, the public tends to take the tunnel for granted, partly because passengers on the Eurostar train between London and Paris don't even see it as they glide through.

But the American Society of Civil Engineers recognizes it as one of the seven wonders of the modern world.

"It's humbling," said Henry Petroski, chairman of the ASCE history and heritage committee. "When it was under construction I took a tour and got a sense of the complexity and scale of it. The project goes back centuries -- they started digging once in the 19th Century -- and to persevere for so long, over generations, makes it terribly significant. The obstacles were not just technical but political and financial as well."

But engineering success does not guarantee financial performance.

Once the tunnel opened, the company formed to operate the undersea link lurched from crisis to crisis, dragging down thousands of small shareholders, some of whom had invested their life savings in what had been dubbed the "construction project of the century."

The tunnel's operator, Eurotunnel, earns revenue from Eurostar, which pays to operate trains under the Channel, and from its own shuttles, which charge a fee to transport cars, camper vans, motorcycles, buses and trucks between France and England.

The tunnel opened a year late in May 1994, having cost about twice as much as original 4.9 billion pound forecast. Those costs, combined with pie-in-the-sky revenue predictions and savage price competition from ferry lines and budget airlines, left Eurotunnel struggling to keep up with the interest payments on its debt.

Once the banks were trapped by huge costs overruns, they transferred a significant part of their risks to poorly informed individual shareholders, according to Laurent Vilanova, a professor at Lyon University in France.

"The project should never have been financed by small shareholders," he said. "They didn't understand what they were getting into."

Most of the original shareholders were French; some who invested their life savings have been ruined.

"There were suicides," said Joseph Gouranton, who mounted a shareholders association to defend their interests. "Two wives came to see me. They were small shopkeepers who put all their money into it. They sold their shops thinking it was a good investment. It was a catastrophe for them."

He said Eurotunnel's original shareholders have lost as much as 90 percent of their original investment, a position endorsed by independent analysts.

CEO Jacques Gounon is credited with masterminding the financial turnaround since taking over in 2005. He negotiated a deal that halved Eurotunnel's debt and rescued the company from bankruptcy. But the operation heavily diluted Eurotunnel's existing shares, which account for 35 percent of the new company, Groupe Eurotunnel SA.

He told the Associated Press that he got the best deal he could for shareholders.

"I tried to defend all the stakeholders," he said. Banks agreed to write off 5 billion euros of debt after two years of difficult negotiations, Gounon said.

Gounon has been mocked for attending a lavish dinner hosted by Germany's Deutsche Bank to celebrate the end of the negotiations.

Guests at the VIP party at the opulent Hotel George V in Paris were treated to some of the world's finest wines, including a Chateau Haut-Brion premier grand cru costing around euro1,000 a bottle, and a 1950 Chateau d'Yquem sauternes estimated at euro2,000 a bottle.

With a Gallic shrug, Gounon said his only sadness comes from the fact that he had to leave before the vintage wines were uncorked.

"What caused the scandal of this dinner was that at the end there was a tasting of very prestigious wines," he said. "If I have a regret, it's not having stayed. They accuse me of having gone to this dinner and I didn't even get to taste the wine."

But lessons have been learned.

Gounon said the anniversary celebration marking 15 years since Queen Elizabeth II and then French President Francois Mitterrand opened the Channel Tunnel in two elaborate ribbon cutting ceremonies in France and England will be a more subdued affair.

Shareholders will meet in the French town of Coquelles, near Calais, to vote on awarding themselves the first dividend in Eurotunnel's troubled history.

"We will be modest, economic," he said. "I think saying that there are no more financial problems at Eurotunnel and to vote the first dividend in the company's history, that's enough to mark the 15th birthday."
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2009, 02:37 AM   #488
kei
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 42
Likes (Received): 3

Although they got all this insurance money, I wonder if they now have to pay higher premiums as a result of the fire?
kei no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 12th, 2009, 08:20 AM   #489
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18218

Quote:
Originally Posted by kei View Post
Although they got all this insurance money, I wonder if they now have to pay higher premiums as a result of the fire?
I suspect probably, but then it shouldn't be as bad as had they encountered a major accident with many casualties.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 25th, 2009, 12:18 AM   #490
Qwert
Moderator
 
Qwert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 12,416
Likes (Received): 2537

Some news

Today the production of high capacity freight broad-gauge carriages for Russian Railways started in Eastern Slovakian town Trebišov. This event was attended also by president of Russian Railways Vladimir Jakunin who said:

"Strong interest in building wide-gauge railway was declared by representatives of Hungarian and Polish Railways. And during the last month on several occasions Hungarians talked with us about it and seek to attract us to the negotiations. They informed me that they thumpingly want to build wide-gauge railway and even that it has support from the government and they have resources to do it. But, the Russian-Ukrainian-Austrian-Slovak project of extension of wide-gauge railway through Slovakia and Austria is well advanced and it undoubtedly has economic benefits. After few years those who criticize it now will argue that they invented it."

Well, I smell some propaganda there, but who knows. Slovak prime minister Robert Fico also declared support for this project.
Qwert no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 25th, 2009, 12:54 PM   #491
RawLee
Registered User
 
RawLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Budapest
Posts: 9,447
Likes (Received): 1084

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwert View Post
"Strong interest in building wide-gauge railway was declared by representatives of Hungarian and Polish Railways. And during the last month on several occasions Hungarians talked with us about it and seek to attract us to the negotiations. They informed me that they thumpingly want to build wide-gauge railway
Thats is as pure BS as it can get. We are to spend a lot of money on the Záhony area where the cargo change happens,including building new industrial parks. If we would build broad gauge railway there,all these things would be meaningless.
RawLee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 25th, 2009, 06:57 PM   #492
gramercy
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,823
Likes (Received): 799

To be brutally honest, I really dont think building 100s of kms of broad gauge is really necessary.

The trial train from Beijing to Hamburg took something like 20 days (!) and averaged something like 18 kph (!!!).

If time is to be improved, maybe money should be spent on the 10.000+ kms in russia, ukraine, kazakstan, mongolia and china.

The last 2-500 kms in slovakia or in poland wont make a damn bit of difference, except moving the logistical facilities out of poland/slovakia/hungary and into germany/austria

not really a good deal for eastern europe...

Last edited by gramercy; May 25th, 2009 at 07:11 PM.
gramercy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 1st, 2009, 03:42 PM   #493
JoKo65
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,111
Likes (Received): 86

Quote:
May 29, 2009

Russian Railways and the Austrian, Slovak and Ukrainian railway companies have signed a Resolution of the Steering Committee for the broad-gauge line extension project on the startup of a JV to complete the feasibility study.

Today in Sochi during the 4th international business forum Strategic Partnership 1520 the CEO of Russian Railways (RZD) Vladimir Yakunin, the General Director of the Ukraine State Railway Administration Mikhail Kostyuk, Member of the Board of Austrian Railways (OBB Holding AG) Gustav Poschalko, and Director of the Slovak State Railway Company Stefan Glinka signed a Resolution of the Steering Committee for the broad-gauge railway extension project on the startup of a JV to complete the project feasibility study.

The project aims to connect the railway systems of Central Europe to the regions crossed by the Trans-Siberian line, to attract freight shipments to the Asia – Russia – Central Europe route, and to make the railway more competitive against sea and road transport.

The broad-gauge line is to be extended from Kosice in Slovakia to the Austrian capital Vienna.

On 4 April 2008, RZD and the Austrian, Slovak and Ukrainian railway companies signed a Protocol on the commencement of pre-project studies on extending the broad-gauge line to Central Europe. The companies agreed to look into the technical and financial feasibility of making the existing infrastructure more attractive, upgrading it and building new railway lines with both narrow and broad gauges.

The project’s approximate cost is estimated at $4-5 billion, with both income and expenditure to be divided in proportion to each country’s section of the line.
http://eng.rzd.ru/wps/portal/rzdeng?...3920&id=104581
__________________
L'Amerique? C'est l'évolution de la barbarie ŕ la décadence, sans toucher la culture.
JoKo65 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 02:44 PM   #494
rmcee
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Warsaw
Posts: 480
Likes (Received): 0

IMHO it is a purely political project, backed by Russia and current Slovak government. One of the biggest questions is the future role of the existing transshipment terminals (Čierna nad Tissou, Zahony, Sławków) - they suffer from scarce traffic and the extension will harm them (the project is purely freight devoted). Railway Market - CEE Review once analysed the Slovak project in comparison to ht LHS line (Ukraine - Poland) - www.railwaymarket.eu And speaking of LHS - the sole operator on the line has lost over 50% of traffic in Q1 2009. It says a lot about the economical viability of such project. Railway Market - CEE Review analyses East - West - East rail freight flows in the issue 2/09.
rmcee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 03:35 PM   #495
gramercy
BANNED
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4,823
Likes (Received): 799

if intercontinental freight needs improvements, its the 10.000 kms of tracks in the former soviet union....tracks that barely allow 20-40-60 kph...

they are gonna spend 5 billion bucks to transfer the logistics facilities out of slovakia/poland and into austria
brilliant...
gramercy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 04:50 PM   #496
rmcee
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Warsaw
Posts: 480
Likes (Received): 0

Actually the attitude towards the project expressed by the next Slovak government will say alot about its economic viability. Elections: Presidential - 2009, parliamentary - 2010.

That's pretty soon

www.railwaymarket.eu
rmcee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 06:12 PM   #497
Qwert
Moderator
 
Qwert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 12,416
Likes (Received): 2537

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
IMHO it is a purely political project, backed by Russia and current Slovak government. One of the biggest questions is the future role of the existing transshipment terminals (Čierna nad Tissou, Zahony, Sławków) - they suffer from scarce traffic and the extension will harm them (the project is purely freight devoted). Railway Market - CEE Review once analysed the Slovak project in comparison to ht LHS line (Ukraine - Poland) - www.railwaymarket.eu And speaking of LHS - the sole operator on the line has lost over 50% of traffic in Q1 2009. It says a lot about the economical viability of such project. Railway Market - CEE Review analyses East - West - East rail freight flows in the issue 2/09.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gramercy View Post
if intercontinental freight needs improvements, its the 10.000 kms of tracks in the former soviet union....tracks that barely allow 20-40-60 kph...

they are gonna spend 5 billion bucks to transfer the logistics facilities out of slovakia/poland and into austria
brilliant...
Main supporters of this project are Russia and Austria. Of course Slovakia and Ukraine is also in favour of it. Interested are also Germany and Asian countries. Main aim of this project is to compete with naval transportation between Asia and Europe. It will obviously affect also transshipment terminals on sites where broad gauge network meets standard one, but these are primarily used to transship cargo to/from Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, not cargo to/from China or South Korea which is now transported by ships.

Amount of cargo transshipped in present terminals will decrease. The biggest decline will be in Záhony and Čierna nad Tisou. Záhony will probably serve only for cargo to/from Hungary and Čierna nad Tisou will be used to transship bulk material as promised by Russians. In case of Polish terminals decline would be smaller, but significant.

Slovakia will profit from transit payments and partially also from transshipping. On the new railway will be terminals in Košice, Zvolen and Bratislava, but I think majority of cargo will be transshipped in Vienna followed by Bratislava. There is also possible extension from Vienna further to the west in the future.

Poland and Hungary will be damaged by this project. Slovakia could make some profit from it, but it's not sure. If this route will become good option how to transport cargo from Asia to Europe then even transit payments can be higher than present transshipping payments.

On the other hand, gramercy is right. Bigger problem for this intercontinental transport is bad condition of railways in the former USSR. They must be improved to establish fast and efficient route to transport cargo from Asia which would be better than naval transport. This doesn't require some HSR, even average speed around 40 km/h would be much better than average speed of ships.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
Actually the attitude towards the project expressed by the next Slovak government will say alot about its economic viability. Elections: Presidential - 2009, parliamentary - 2010.

That's pretty soon

www.railwaymarket.eu
Main supporter of this project is Smer-SD party, which is very probably going to win upcoming general elections and it will also lead the new government. In Slovakia this project has clear political support at least until 2014 elections.

Last edited by Qwert; June 2nd, 2009 at 06:17 PM.
Qwert no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 06:32 PM   #498
Coccodrillo
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 7,200
Likes (Received): 768

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qwert View Post
Main aim of this project is to compete with naval transportation between Asia and Europe.
Cargo destination is not only Vienna, transhipment would still be necessary for most goods.
__________________
1.6.2016: Basistunnel!

für Güter die Bahn ~ pour vos marchandises le rail ~ chi dice merci dice ferrovia
Coccodrillo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 07:09 PM   #499
Qwert
Moderator
 
Qwert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 12,416
Likes (Received): 2537

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Cargo destination is not only Vienna, transhipment would still be necessary for most goods.
Cargo transported by ships has to be transhipped to trucks and trains as well.
Qwert no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 2nd, 2009, 08:02 PM   #500
Coccodrillo
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 7,200
Likes (Received): 768

Yes but transhipping from broad to standard gauge wagons in Vienna or in Chop is quite the same.

Except thain in Vienna there would be a railway dedicated only to freight.
__________________
1.6.2016: Basistunnel!

für Güter die Bahn ~ pour vos marchandises le rail ~ chi dice merci dice ferrovia
Coccodrillo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:22 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium