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Old June 8th, 2009, 11:01 PM   #521
jayOOfoshO
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Economic and political relations between Germany and Russia are key to understand what is happening in Eastern Europe
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Old June 8th, 2009, 11:13 PM   #522
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And how is that related to central europe? And what does Russia have to do with a China-Germany train?
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Old June 9th, 2009, 12:56 AM   #523
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And how is that related to central europe? And what does Russia have to do with a China-Germany train?
China - Germany train has to run through Russia.

Both Russia and Germany have influence on what is happening in Central and Eastern Europe, they are our biggest trade partners, both (but mainly Germany) have investments in the region and so on. But, important for the region are rather relations between particular CEE countries and Germany and particular CEE countries and Russia, not relations between Germany and Russia only.
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Old June 9th, 2009, 10:18 AM   #524
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China - Germany train has to run through Russia.
No, it hasn´t.

But the other choice, south of Caspian Sea, is Iran (just those two states and Caspian stretch all across Eurasia). I suspect that both Germans and Chinese rather prefer Russia - geometrically shorter, easier terrain, more ready infrastructure.
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Old June 9th, 2009, 10:45 AM   #525
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this is the tricky question - what sort of traffic is the broad gauge line through Slovakia designed for:

a) Asia - Europe containerized traffic (supposed to boom in the future. Now it almost entitrely goes by ship)

or

b) CIS - Europe (bulk, in the more distant future also containers, as high value production of computers, flat screens etc moves to CIS)

Countries like Molodova mentioned ealier put high hopes in a)

Russia says b) - upgrades Western Russia port infastructure and establishes Trans Eurasia Logistics with long distance business perspectives
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Old June 9th, 2009, 08:06 PM   #526
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
this is the tricky question - what sort of traffic is the broad gauge line through Slovakia designed for:

a) Asia - Europe containerized traffic (supposed to boom in the future. Now it almost entitrely goes by ship)

or

b) CIS - Europe (bulk, in the more distant future also containers, as high value production of computers, flat screens etc moves to CIS)

Countries like Molodova mentioned ealier put high hopes in a)

Russia says b) - upgrades Western Russia port infastructure and establishes Trans Eurasia Logistics with long distance business perspectives
It should be for traffic between Asia (mainly China) and Europe. Of course, also traffic between Europe and CIS may use it.
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Old June 24th, 2009, 03:59 PM   #527
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at yesterday's CEE Rail Operators Forum in Warsaw, ZSSK Cargo said that:
- ZSSK Cargo is not a partner in the broad gauge project
- the project si highly political and one cannot know if the comming elections will not put end to it
- the braod guauge project will harm ZSSK and the employees of the Eastern border terminals
- ZSSK Cargo cannot say if it would be the sole operator on the line, but most probably it would be the only one burdened with the need to buy broad gauge locos
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Old June 25th, 2009, 01:27 PM   #528
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
at yesterday's CEE Rail Operators Forum in Warsaw, ZSSK Cargo said that:
- ZSSK Cargo is not a partner in the broad gauge project
- the project si highly political and one cannot know if the comming elections will not put end to it
- the braod guauge project will harm ZSSK and the employees of the Eastern border terminals
- ZSSK Cargo cannot say if it would be the sole operator on the line, but most probably it would be the only one burdened with the need to buy broad gauge locos


I'm not a betting man, but I reckon the Vienna broad gauge link has a very good chance of never seeing the light of day.

Does any one else think the same?
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Old June 25th, 2009, 03:01 PM   #529
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Slovak railwaypeople this so ; )
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Old June 29th, 2009, 07:46 PM   #530
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Working on the Railroad
8 June 2009
Time International Asia Ed.

Train travel in Europe has been losing passengers to airlines, but deregulation is about to usher in an era of faster, cheaper rail service.

As any of the millions of young people who have roamed the Continent with a pack on their back and Eurail pass in hand can attest, there is something quintessentially European about traveling by train. Or was. European airline deregulation 12 years ago has turned hopping on a plane into a bargain-basement no-brainer. Thanks mostly to the increased competition, improved services and lower prices spawned by regulatory liberalization, air travel in Europe grew at an average annual rate of 4.5% between 1995 and 2005 Over the same period, the total number of miles traveled by all rail passengers chugged along at less than 1% annual average growth.

Now Europe's railroad industry, for decades dominated by stodgy state-owned monopolies, is ready for a renaissance of its own. A looming round of deregulation is set to spark an industry restructuring, pitting existing state-owned railroads against smaller private upstarts. At the same time, countries including Spain, Italy and France are spending billions of dollars on new high-speed railroads and rolling stock to compete with airlines. All this means one thing for travelers in Europe contemplating a switch from increasingly stressful and time-consuming air travel to more civilized rail: all aboard.

The most radical change arrives this December, when European Union regulations will for the first time allow all rail operators to compete with one another for passengers on international routes. The change, which comes four years after similar moves in the freight sector, is designed to open up routes that currently are controlled by state monopolies. For travelers, deregulation will mean lower prices, faster trains and greater convenience--for example, passengers now are usually forced to change to trains run by the incumbent state-owned operator when they cross into another country. Under the new rules, railroads will be able to operate seamlessly across borders and even pick up new passengers outside their home countries en route to their final destination.

By opening up the market, regulators hope to give rail companies room to offer more frequent and diverse services, like special business-class cars. "Our experience has shown that choice is important to travelers, and when you increase the range of choice with new products, services and suppliers, you increase the number of clients who want to explore those new options," says Mireille Faugčre, president of domestic and international passenger services for France's state rail company, Société Nationale des Chemins de Fer Français (SNCF). "For a company like ours--which derives 20% of its business from international travel--this liberalization is far more an opportunity than a threat."

Even before deregulation, Europe's rail industry has been modernizing and expanding. France, which has Europe's largest high-speed rail network, plans to more than double its track length from 1,200 miles (1,900 km) to 2,500 miles (4,000 km) by 2020 Spain is aiming to leapfrog France as high-speed leader with a $130 billion expansion; when completed in 2020, 90% of all Spaniards will live no more than 31 miles (50 km) from a station served by Alta Velocidad Espańola (AVE) trains, which have a top speed of 218 m.p.h. (351 km/h). Italy and the Netherlands are also on a track-laying spree. All told, nine E.U. nations operating high-speed rail are set to spend a total of some $200 billion in the next decade to triple their combined track length from 3,100 miles (5,000 km) to 9,300 miles (15,000 km).

This burgeoning of national high-speed networks is allowing trains to challenge airlines on shorter trips even before deregulation comes into force. The Eurostar service--the lucrative 2ź-hour route between London and Paris--already controls 70% of the travel market between the two capitals. Opened in 2007, a high-speed rail link between Madrid and Barcelona that cut intercity travel time to 2˝ hours has grabbed 50% of that market. Similar effects have been seen in Paris-Lyon, Paris-Brussels and Hamburg-Berlin transport links, where domination by fast trains has led airlines to reduce or drop services altogether. "When travel time is two hours or less, high-speed rail wins 90% market share [against] airplanes," says SNCF's Faugčre. "It's little wonder airlines like Air France are considering starting their own high-speed rail services to win some of the business back, something we find quite flattering."

Still, no one is predicting railroads will put airlines out of business. Railteam, a ticketing consortium of seven leading high-speed rail operators, aims to boost the number of people who now use fast trains for international European travel each year from 15 million to 25 million by 2011 That compares with some 160 million who travel across borders by air in Europe every year, a number that is expected to double by 2020 The railroads' relatively modest growth expectations are grounded in some harsh economic realities: new high-speed rail lines take years to plan and build as well as billions of dollars in investment. Moreover, Europe's rail operators are just beginning a chaotic period of industry restructuring and consolidation that usually accompanies deregulation.

In an effort to gain operating efficiencies and to outmaneuver rivals, some of Europe's main rail operators are already forming partnerships. SNCF, for example, runs a high-speed Paris-Brussels-Amsterdam-Cologne service called Thalys along with Belgian rail operator Société Nationale des Chemins de Fer Belge (SNCB) and Germany's Deutsche Bahn (DB). DB also uses the French company's track to operate its high-speed Intercity-Express (ICE) trains between eastern France and Paris. But, despite their cooperation on some routes, DB and SNCF are locking horns over Eurostar. The French have a majority stake in Eurostar, which also includes the Belgians and the U.K.'s London and Continental Railways (LCR). DB has made no secret that it is looking to buy LCR's 33% stake--which the French also covet, in part to deny DB its dream of extending its routes into the U.K. Meanwhile, the German group has ordered 15 new ICE locomotives with a full range of signaling technology that can be adapted to virtually any rail system in the E.U.

To further complicate matters, new companies are looking to muscle their way onto the tracks. Italian start-up Nuovo Trasporto Viaggiatori (NTV) is set to launch Europe's first privately operated high-speed service in Italy in 2011, in competition with Italy's former rail monopoly Trenitalia. Headed by Fiat and Ferrari CEO Luca Cordero di Montezemolo, NTV plans to establish a broad network of high-speed Italian services that dovetail with French routes run by SNCF, which owns 20% of NTV.

Of course, such market tumult ultimately means some railroads may find the going tough. To get an idea of what competition might do to the passenger-train industry, take a look at the freight sector, which was opened up to cross-border rivalries in late 2005 In France, nine new operators that stepped in to take on SNCF's freight service have captured 11% of the market in just five years. That may not sound like much, but the smaller players are making money while the state-owned giant is not. "What's significant in this isn't the element of competition alone, but the more efficient business models new players brought to old markets," says Alain Bonnafous, a rail expert at Lyon's Laboratory of Transport Economics. "Better organization and increasing return on investment makes all the difference."

As railroads begin competing on price and quality of service, the big winners are bound to be passengers. Further deregulation is in store: in 2012, national markets, not just international routes, are slated to be opened to more competition. "Travel as we've known it recently is being turned on its head, with larger numbers of people using high-speed rail to avoid the hassles, delays and stress of taking an airplane," says Mark Smith, a U.K.-based industry expert and founder of rail-travel website seat61.com. "On routes of three hours or less, you get to your destination faster and more comfortably than by air. And which is more glamorous these days: a high-tech Eurostar train with interiors designed by Philippe Starck and Christian Lacroix, or a crammed Ryanair plane that asks you to pay to use the restroom?" Perhaps train travel will become quintessentially European once again.

*****

NTV, Italy

10 million Annual passengers (projected 2015)

Nuovo Trasporto Viaggiatori (NTV), Italy's first private high-speed train operator, aims to capture 20% of the market within four years of its 2011 launch by running ultra-modern, 190 m.p.h. (300 km/h) AGV trains (pictured) made by France's Alstom Transport

SNCF, France

1.2 billion Passengers (2008)

$34 billion Revenue (2008)

France's monopoly rail operator pioneered high-speed rail with the debut of the TGV train in 1981 The company seeks to increase international service via partnerships such as its lucrative Paris-London Eurostar venture (below), which has a 70% market share

Deutsche Bahn, Germany

1.9 billion Passengers (2008)

$45.1 billion Revenue (2008)

Deutsche Bahn (DB), Europe's largest freight carrier, has sought stakes in private train operators in the U.K. and Italy. DB is reportedly close to signing a deal that would enable it to run its high-speed ICE trains (above) between London and German destinations
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Old June 30th, 2009, 01:31 AM   #531
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So apparently this is a BIG deal lol. Yea I get it don't worry, can't wait for 2010 either.
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Old June 30th, 2009, 12:55 PM   #532
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Freight One bosses believe in the broad gauge project:


Slovakia, Russia: Agreement signed between Freight One and ZSSK Cargo

The Russian company Freight One signed an agreement with ZSSK Cargo from Slovakia. According to the document, wagons of Freight One will now be able to operate in Slovak Republic on the terms of private operators.

Rates on freight hauling and empty runs will be calculated in accordance with the rate-setting practices that are applicable to the Slovakian company’s own railway cars.

- Our company is interested in new markets and expanding its presence in European countries, especially in light of Russian Railways’ promising projects to extend the 1,520 gauge through Slovakia to Vienna. - Salman Babayev, general director of the Russian operator, said.

Similar agreements were signed last year between Freight One and state-owned companies from Poland (PKP Cargo), Romania (CFR Marfa) and Finland (VR Cargo).
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Old June 30th, 2009, 02:12 PM   #533
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
at yesterday's CEE Rail Operators Forum in Warsaw, ZSSK Cargo said that:
- ZSSK Cargo is not a partner in the broad gauge project
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
The Russian company Freight One signed an agreement with ZSSK Cargo from Slovakia.
Interesting...
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Old June 30th, 2009, 02:22 PM   #534
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neither one of them is directly involved, but you can see that Freight One declares they are interested and ZSSK Cargo seems not that keen to get involved...
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Old June 30th, 2009, 02:41 PM   #535
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcee View Post
Freight One bosses believe in the broad gauge project:


Slovakia, Russia: Agreement signed between Freight One and ZSSK Cargo

The Russian company Freight One signed an agreement with ZSSK Cargo from Slovakia. According to the document, wagons of Freight One will now be able to operate in Slovak Republic on the terms of private operators.

Rates on freight hauling and empty runs will be calculated in accordance with the rate-setting practices that are applicable to the Slovakian company’s own railway cars.

- Our company is interested in new markets and expanding its presence in European countries, especially in light of Russian Railways’ promising projects to extend the 1,520 gauge through Slovakia to Vienna. - Salman Babayev, general director of the Russian operator, said.

Similar agreements were signed last year between Freight One and state-owned companies from Poland (PKP Cargo), Romania (CFR Marfa) and Finland (VR Cargo).
I'm afraid I don't understand. Private freight operators are allowed to operate on Slovak railways and it has nothing to do with ZSSK Cargo. ZSSK Cargo is only one of the many operators and Freight One could use Slovak railways without any cooperation with ZSSK Cargo. Of course they need some approval and their wagons and locos must meet technical criteria, but this depends rather on Ministry of Transportation and ŽSR (railway maintenance company).

BTW, are they interested in operation on normal gauge railways or broad gauge line between Uzhhorod and Košice?
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Old June 30th, 2009, 06:39 PM   #536
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Thats good...then there are more routes from London.
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Old June 30th, 2009, 11:07 PM   #537
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It's not just NTV that goes into competition with Trenitalia.

The DB and the ÖBB will be working with the Italian private railway FNM (that has a big suburban network North of Milano) on the Brenner route (München - Verona) instead of Trenitalia that didn't show any interest in upgrading the services on this route.
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Old July 31st, 2009, 02:45 PM   #538
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ŽSR will invest in the construction of TIP Žilina almost EUR 40m

seems that despite the crisis ŽSR does not neglect intermodal. A much more reasonalbe step.

I would like to start a thread on European / CEE container terminals. Hopefully it gets some interest. Probably soon I could post some pics from CTL Logistics new terminal near Lodz (PL).
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Old July 31st, 2009, 04:31 PM   #539
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Just container terminals?

If you start one, make it one on intermodal terminals, which means you cover both those for container traffic, and those for piggyback/swap body traffic.
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Old July 31st, 2009, 04:33 PM   #540
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Please let me know when you do by the way.
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