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Old February 14th, 2012, 06:01 AM   #321
goten2255
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yes yes yes yes baby yeah finally thank the lord and praise the celebration.

finally about time BART is going to San Jose wasn't this project long long overdue????

also which this means that BART is going to connect with the California HSR project as well which is awesome along the the San jose light rail and maybe street cars can be reintroduced to other cities as well.

i hear that CHSR project that they will upgrade the caltrain system to run on electric and upgrade Metrolink in Los Angeles which is cool its much cheaper doing that its what the TGV where it uses existing networks in the cities and towns and then uses its own high speed rail networks in the country side.

am i supposed to be talking about the CHSR network in here???

anyways i wanted to know something i hear BART is going to have four tracks as well like the NYC subway system and Chicago L as well but where there going to put the four tracks or three track network i heard of it somewhere?

and Congralations that SMART is building its railway line about time already good stuffs in california please keep this up i think alot of people are tired of traffic jams already.
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Old February 16th, 2012, 12:20 PM   #322
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Quote:


Galveston's Used Rail Bridge Moving to California
New draw bridge being installed
http://www.myfoxhouston.com/dpp/news...-to-california
Updated: Tuesday, 14 Feb 2012, 12:29 PM CST
Published : Tuesday, 14 Feb 2012, 12:22 PM CST

GALVESTON, Texas - Who would have thought an old bridge in Galveston would find a new home about 50 miles north of the Golden Gate Bridge?

The rail bridge that runs parallel to Galveston's causeway is moving west as a new rail draw bridge is installed.

SkyFox was over the scene as workers put the new draw bridge in place around noon Tuesday.

According to the Galveston County Daily News , the new bridge is part of an $80 million project to replace the old, narrow bridge. The new 1,580-ton bridge is being installed by a team of more than 100 people.

The old bridge was purchased by the Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit just north of San Fransisco. According to PressDemocrat.com , officials there are planning to replace the district's swing bridge over the Petaluma River.
....
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Old February 16th, 2012, 06:32 PM   #323
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I think it's so cool how they're going to move the bridge from Texas!

Here's the PD article referred to:

Quote:
SMART buys a (draw)bridge


Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit officials are planning to buy a used draw bridge in Galveston, Texas, to replace the district's 100-year-old swing bridge over the Petaluma River that, while historic and repairable, is badly in need of replacement.
SMART handout

By BOB NORBERG
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT
Published: Tuesday, February 14, 2012 at 7:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Tuesday, February 14, 2012 at 7:30 a.m.

Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit officials intend to buy a used draw bridge in Galveston, Texas, to replace the 99-year-old swing bridge over the Petaluma River.

Rather than launch a $20 million rehab of the aging structure at Haystack Landing, and then perhaps spending $30 million to replace it in 20 years, SMART says that for $20 million it can buy and install the used bridge and have it last 75 to 80 years.

...

The Texas bridge is on the BSFN Railway line linking the Texas mainland to Galveston Island. It was built in 1985 and is being replaced by a new vertical lift bridge to increase the channel width.

“It is a really solid bridge,” said Bill Gamlen, SMART chief engineer. “We will have to do some mechanical upgrades, but it is a very stout bridge. The BNSF doesn't want to get rid of it, but the Coast Guard is driving the replacement.”

It is called a bascule draw bridge, meaning it uses a counterweight to lift the “leaf,” or rail bed, into an almost vertical position. It is on the historic vehicle causeway that was converted to a rail line.

Gamlen said the new bridge would open or close in about 90 seconds, instead of the 2½ to 3 minutes needed for the swing bridge.

It also is long enough to allow the Petaluma River channel to be widened from 56 feet to 87 feet, and allow SMART trains to cross at higher speeds.

The bridge over the Petaluma River was built in 1903. It uses a 5-horsepower electric motor, fabric belts and bevel gears to pivot slowly on a turntable that is 10 feet in diameter.

“One of the problems with the swing bridge is the reliability,” Gamlen said. “I have been out there and have seen it take three or four tries to get it closed.”

...

Parts of old swing could be used in other areas on the SMART line, primarily at creek crossings and to replace existing wooden trestles.

....

You can reach Staff Writer Bob Norberg at 521-5206 or [email protected].
http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article...9800?p=2&tc=pg
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Old February 17th, 2012, 02:46 AM   #324
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goten2255 View Post
yes yes yes yes baby yeah finally thank the lord and praise the celebration.

finally about time BART is going to San Jose wasn't this project long long overdue????

also which this means that BART is going to connect with the California HSR project as well which is awesome along the the San jose light rail and maybe street cars can be reintroduced to other cities as well.
Yeah, your right, the BART To San Jose extension was on the drawing boards back in the 1990s & was planned to be up & running by now. However, a couple of big snafus got in the way:

The dot-com boom that was generating all the extra bucks went bust after 1999. The Santa Clara County Transit District that was supposed to come up with a big share of the local funding match it the skids owing mostly to poor management. So this project is coming about a dozen years behind schedule.

As for Cal HSR, there's still lots of hurdles ahead.
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Old February 19th, 2012, 06:06 AM   #325
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Catching up with some sad news from Sacramento:

Three Killed After Light Rail Train Hits Vehicle
Kathy Paez, Eric Rucker. McClatchy - Tribune Business News. Washington: Jan 28, 2012.

(c)2012 KTXL-TV (Sacramento, Calif.) Visit KTXL-TV (Sacramento, Calif.) at www.fox40.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

Jan. 28--SACRAMENTO -- Three people have been killed, including an 18-month-old boy, and many more injured after a light rail train hit an SUV with four people inside.

The accident happened just after 4 p.m. Saturday at the railroad crossing at 25th Street and 26th Avenue in South Sacramento.

The details are unclear as to how the accident happened, but Sacramento City Fire Department Assistant Chief Niko King says three people in the Nissan Pathfinder were killed after it was struck by the light rail train heading south.

"It looks like it was a really hard impact," said King. He said the SUV appeared to have rolled a few times and landed on its roof.

Two of the people inside the SUV were dead when emergency crews arrived. The two other people inside the SUV were taken to the hospital, one of those people later died. One of the three who died is identified as an 18-month-old boy. Officials are not releasing any identifying information about the other victims.

The fire department says 17 light rail passengers reported minor pain and bruising after the accident and were taken to the hospital to be checked out.

Witnesses say the SUV tried to beat the train, but that has not been confirmed.

Sacramento Police are looking at video from Regional Transit, both on the train and on a nearby pole, and other evidence to figure out what happened. The driver of the train stayed onscene and talked with investigators.

Regional Transit representatives think the car was going eastbound and may have gone around the arm when it was in the down position.

The train tracks and surrounding area was shut down for several hours Saturday night.
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Old February 21st, 2012, 01:46 AM   #326
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Here's an update on the much needed but long-delayed East Bay BRT thru Oakland to suburban San Leandro:

BUS PLAN RECEIVING A MIXED REVIEWAC TRANSIT FAST BUS PROJECT TO BOOST RIDERSHIP, BUT TAKE AWAY PARKING SPACES;
Contra Costa Times. Walnut Creek, Calif.: Feb 19, 2012.

Copyright Bay Area News Feb 19, 2012

By Denis Cuff

AC Transit's $205 million plan for a bus rapid transit line for speedier service through Oakland and San Leandro would boost system ridership 4 percent but take away hundreds of curbside parking spaces and worsen traffic congestion at six intersections, according to an environmental report.

Release of the report opens a public comment period in advance of the AC Transit board's final decision in the spring whether to develop the 14.4-mile-long line touted as "rail on wheels."

Seven public hearings on the environmental report are planned in Oakland and San Leandro between Thursday and March 12.

Buses would arrive every five minutes. Bus-only lanes with elevated platforms for quick loading would be developed on much of the route along Telegraph Avenue, International Boulevard and East 14th Street.

Many public transit advocates tout the project as a way to lure drivers out of their cars, but some critics say it will be harder for motorists to drive and find parking.

"We think there is a benefit to us in attracting more riders and a benefit to the cities in attracting investments for transit-oriented developments" said Jim Cunradi, AC Transit's bus rapid transit project director.

The report estimates that the project would boost AC Transit's overall bus ridership by 4 percent or by 13,700 passengers between 2015 and 2035.

About 9,000 of those extra passengers would be new transit riders lured out of their cars. Others would be passengers lured away from other bus lanes or BART.

The overall time saving for bus riders will exceed the time lost by motorists who couldn't drive as fast, Cunradi said.

Motorists will find more congestion at six intersections -- mostly in north Oakland along Telegraph Avenue where there is little room to modify the intersections, according to the report.

"It's not going to cause gridlock, but it will cause impacts that are significant," Cunradi said. "We examined more than 100 intersections and found only six where impacts could be not be mitigated."

Those car traffic delays could be avoided if AC Transit scaled back the bus project to omit about four miles of route north of downtown Oakland, he added.

Switching to that $152 million alternative would reduce bus ridership, but it would solve another problem -- a money shortage.

AC transit is about $33 million short of having enough money commitments to build the full-size $205 million project, the report writers say.

Parking is another issue. The bus rapid transit would displace 1,000 curbside parking spaces in Oakland and San Leandro -- but about half of them are in areas where there is not a parking shortage, the report says.

In other areas, AC Transit would consider whether to offset parking shortages by acquiring nearby land for new parking lots or working with cities to set time limits on some curbside parking areas.

"We are trying to work with the cities to come up with a proposal that fits each neighborhood," Cunradi said.

A small portion of the 14.4 mile route is in Berkeley, but buses won't speed up in that city because the Berkeley City Council last year withdrew from the project by refusing to convert auto lanes to bus-only lanes.

For more information on the planned public hearings, view www.actransit.org. and click on news.
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Old February 23rd, 2012, 03:05 AM   #327
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San Francisco Launches Innovative Muni History Exhibit to Celebrate 100 Years
Targeted News Service. Washington, D.C.: Feb 21, 2012.

Copyright © Targeted News Service. All Rights Reserved.

The office of the San Francisco Mayor issued the following news release:

Today Mayor Edwin M. Lee, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) and partners Market Street Railway (MSR) and Historypin announced the launch of "Treasures from the Muni Archive," a new exhibit of photographs from Muni's extensive archive celebrating the last 100 years. The exhibit is installed on Muni transit shelters along Market Street, at the MSR Museum and on Historypin, a project of the London-based non-profit We Are What We Do.

"San Francisco is excited to launch the 'Treasures from the Muni Archive' exhibit to engage the City about Muni's rich past and begin the celebration of Muni's centennial," said Mayor Lee. "The high-tech features of this exhibit make history come alive and represent San Francisco's commitment to innovation."

"With nearly 30,000 photos in the SFMTA archive, we are pleased to have such a unique way to share them with residents and visitors," said SFMTA Director of Transportation Edward D. Reiskin. "We are grateful to our long-standing partner, MSR, and one of our newest partners, Historypin, for making this exciting exhibit possible."

"Our City has one of the richest transportation histories in America," said MSR President Rick Laubscher. "We salute Muni for the work it is doing in preserving its own precious archives and sharing them with San Franciscans and visitors alike through this project. We're proud to help on this and other activities marking Muni's centennial."

The SFMTA's civic art project takes visitors from a traditional exhibit of approximately 20 archive images at the MSR Museum that were featured in the book, "San Francisco's Municipal Railway: Muni," to the city's streets where semi-transparent, site-specific images have been mounted on the backs of Muni wave shelters along Market Street between the Museum and the Powell Cable Car turnaround. The physical exhibit is supported by an extensive online collection from Muni's archives at Historypin.com.

"The SFMTA Photographic Archive's innovative displays have turned bus shelters into free history museums," said Historypin CEO Nick Stanhope. "While San Francisco may be the first city doing it, I fully expect this trend to catch on around the world."

With the help of Historypin, the SFMTA can now share a tour of site-specific images. Shelter displays have a QR code that allow viewers to access a summary of the exhibit and a link to the free Historypin.com app. The app allows the viewer mobile access to Historypin's site where they can explore numerous photos of their current location, explore the full Historypin collection or post their own photograph from that location. The SFMTA Archive's page on Historypin will also be available on interactive monitors at the MSR Museum.

The Municipal Railway was founded on December 28, 1912. During Muni's centennial year there will be several events to provide people with information about Muni's world-renown transit history, including additional photography exhibits from Muni's archive that dates back to the 19th century, vintage vehicles in City events and, in collaboration with MSR, a revival of the popular trolley festivals. Centennial events officially kick off in the Spring.

About Market Street Railway

Market Street Railway is the nonprofit preservation partner of the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni), the city agency that owns and operates San Francisco's transit system, including its historic streetcars and cable cars. The 1200-member organization's leaders were a driving force in making vintage streetcars a permanent part of the San Francisco scene. Today, besides supporting Muni's historic streetcar and cable car service, Market Street Railway operates the San Francisco Railway Museum across from the Ferry Building at 77 Steuart Street as part of its mission of preserving historic transit in San Francisco.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 09:24 PM   #328
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I didn't know anything about muni.

Seems strange a mix of light metro, tram and even cable car!
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Old February 25th, 2012, 12:50 AM   #329
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Quote:
Hundreds attend SMART groundbreaking ceremony in Petaluma


Supervisor Valerie Brown and others at the Petaluma ceremony on Friday, Feb. 24, 2012.
KENT PORTER/ PD

By BOB NORBERG
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT
Published: Friday, February 24, 2012 at 1:27 p.m.
Last Modified: Friday, February 24, 2012 at 1:27 p.m.

North Coast politicians and transit supporters gathered in Petaluma on Friday for a ceremonial groundbreaking for the SMART commute train that will run between Sonoma and Marin counties.

“This is a historic moment, it has been a long time coming,” said Rep. Lynn Woolsey, D-Petaluma. “We simply can't meet our transportation needs by building roads. It's not cost-effective. It is not smart.”

The ceremony was held at the historic Petaluma depot and attracted a crowd of 400, a large number of whom took turns with the 49 golden shovels to turn over a mound of dirt crossing the tracks.

The gathering came 30 years after politicians in both counties began working to preserve the Northwestern Pacific Railroad right-of-way as a future transit corridor, a decade after the rail transit district was formed and four years after voters passed a quarter-cent sales tax to fund the train.

“It's been a long road,” said Cloverdale Councilwoman Carol Russell, a director of the rail agency, Sonoma-Marin Area Regional Transit...

The agency has faced multiple challenges over the past four years, with a recession forcing SMART to scale back the initial line and delay the beginning of service...

SMART Chairwoman Valerie Brown, a Sonoma County supervisor, said the effort to repeal the sales tax, passed by 70 percent of Sonoma and Marin voters in November 2008, was the most troubling.

“That was absolutely a worry, that we had to be back on the ballot and fight it out again,” Brown said.The event also was attended by Rep. Mike Thompson, D-St. Helena; state senators Noreen Evans, D-Santa Rosa, and Mark Leno, D-San Francisco; and state assembly members Mike Allen, D-San Rafael; Wes Chesbro, D-Arcata; and Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael.

In the past two months, SMART has sold construction bonds and awarded a $103 million contract for the initial work to build the line and stations from Gureneville Road in Santa Rosa to the Marin Civic Center in San Rafael.

It is preparing to award another construction contract within the next few months to build between the Civic Center and downtown San Rafael.

Trains are scheduled to begin running on the initial line, 38.5 miles, in late 2014 or early 2015....
http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article...1350?p=1&tc=pg
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Old February 26th, 2012, 05:27 AM   #330
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lezgotolondon View Post
I didn't know anything about muni.

Seems strange a mix of light metro, tram and even cable car!
In addition MUNI also runs large bus, & trolleybus fleets plus some hybrid diessel/electric vehicles. If one adds in all the 25 plus transit agencies around the Bay Area, the region probably boasts one of the largest assortment of different modes of transit worldwide.

And yet, there's plenty of room for improvements! Not so much huge, costly, waistful, multi-billion dollar budget-breaking boondogles. Rather more in the way of basic service, mainteance, cleaning, & management improvements. Plus more coordination & ultimately some administative consolidation.
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Old February 26th, 2012, 06:47 AM   #331
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Quote:
Hundreds attend SMART groundbreaking ceremony in Petaluma
Good to see a groundbreaking on a rail line in America- I had thought common wisdom was that projects other than roadbuilding were dubbed "boondoggles" and "experiments in socialism" that had to be killed outright(sarcasm).
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Old February 26th, 2012, 08:20 AM   #332
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Good to see a groundbreaking on a rail line in America- I had thought common wisdom was that projects other than roadbuilding were dubbed "boondoggles" and "experiments in socialism" that had to be killed outright(sarcasm).
There in fact WAS a repeal effort - which failed to get enough signatures to get on the ballot.
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Old February 26th, 2012, 08:40 AM   #333
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Good to see a groundbreaking on a rail line in America- I had thought common wisdom was that projects other than roadbuilding were dubbed "boondoggles" and "experiments in socialism" that had to be killed outright(sarcasm).
SMART seems like a good, cost-effective rail project that lives up to its name, will provide long-overdue connections in the North Bay, an area that hasn't had rail. Hopefully eventually we'll have rail connections between SF & the North Bay.

On the other hand, now & then we do see some boondoogles in the making that have more to do with political pork & less to do with transit. Those of us who are pro-transit also have professional a duty to make sure that projects are well-designed, cost-effective, & don't detract from existing & future service needs.
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Old March 2nd, 2012, 09:43 PM   #334
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Here is the latest rendering of the SMART train interior:


http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fb...e=1&permPage=1
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Old March 3rd, 2012, 08:19 PM   #335
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I trust that climbing into and off of that N American stock won't be necessary. Is the stock going to be that narrow?


clickable...



clickable...


Anyhow, SMART's far away from SF Bay, it probably deserves its own thread
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Old March 3rd, 2012, 09:25 PM   #336
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Originally Posted by trainrover View Post
I trust that climbing into and off of that N American stock won't be necessary. Is the stock going to be that narrow?

...

Anyhow, SMART's far away from SF Bay, it probably deserves its own thread
Both Sonoma and Marin are part of the San Francisco Bay Area, defined as the nine counties that touch and ring the San Francisco Bay:

Quote:
The Bay Area's nine counties are Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_Bay_Area

I think this thread is the proper place for discussion of this rail line, especially since this thread also technically includes Sacramento.
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Old March 5th, 2012, 07:28 AM   #337
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I think this thread is the proper place for discussion of this rail line, especially since this thread also technically includes Sacramento.
Indeed it is.

Please do keep updating us on the project status!
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Old March 5th, 2012, 10:57 PM   #338
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Isn't there still much wilderness alongside the 101 corridor twixt the north shore and Santa Rosa?
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Old March 5th, 2012, 11:02 PM   #339
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So what are the planned frequencies of the SMART line?
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Old March 5th, 2012, 11:13 PM   #340
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayviews View Post
SMART seems like a good, cost-effective rail project that lives up to its name, will provide long-overdue connections in the North Bay, an area that hasn't had rail. Hopefully eventually we'll have rail connections between SF & the North Bay.

On the other hand, now & then we do see some boondoogles in the making that have more to do with political pork & less to do with transit. Those of us who are pro-transit also have professional a duty to make sure that projects are well-designed, cost-effective, & don't detract from existing & future service needs.
I'd say it's a great "second best". I'd rather see the BART Richmond Line extended through a second tunnel (parallel to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge) into Marin County and on up to Santa Rosa (and that's assuming a Golden Gate crossing is just too hard). But that's probably not going to happen, so I'm a fan of SMART, assuming they do something to permit efficient transfer to a ferry to SF at the southern terminus.
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