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Old March 19th, 2012, 03:27 AM   #361
Anderson Reis
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No, not here in Sao Paulo.

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Old March 19th, 2012, 06:13 AM   #362
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sao paulo metro indeed looks similar to BART in the train design it does heck i am happy alot of great things is happening to BART.

also i heard BART will be going to the Transbay terminal and then to west San Francisco as well to Gaery i believe or something and will have four tracks in oakland that they announced the 50th anniversary for BART.

i know Metrorail systems are expensive now but i think Metrorail systems work the best in dense areas why is it that this was possible back then and now no city wants metrorails anymore?
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Old March 19th, 2012, 06:44 PM   #363
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I suspect the answer lies in your question: working best, let alone better, meddles with lucrativeness
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Old March 19th, 2012, 08:52 PM   #364
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Originally Posted by goten2255 View Post
sao paulo metro indeed looks similar to BART in the train design...
It is true, are very similar in design:




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Old March 23rd, 2012, 08:58 AM   #365
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I would like to clarify a doubt. In San Francisco it is necessary to ask for any authorization to photograph the BART trains and stations?

Look at that beautiful image I found in the Pacific Southwest Railway Museum:

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Old March 24th, 2012, 05:45 AM   #366
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Quote:
bids to build the Chinatown Station for San Francisco’s Central Subway due May 8th, and construction scheduled to be completed by the end of 2017 . . . .

(Chinatown Station Entrance)


The solicitation for bids to build a $189 million Union Square/Market Street Subway Station is expected to be advertised next month.

(Union Square Station Entrance)
Source: http://www.socketsite.com/archives/2...e_renderi.html
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Old March 27th, 2012, 04:45 AM   #367
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This comparison is good therefore indicates that the BART system is very effective. Here in Sao Paulo for example the subway system was modelled on BART and Metro de São Paulo is very effective.

Yeah, Glad that Sao Paulo has one of the best & certainly most comprehensive rapid transit systems in Latin America!
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Old March 28th, 2012, 07:55 AM   #368
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I would like to clarify a doubt. In San Francisco it is necessary to ask for any authorization to photograph the BART trains and stations?

In cities NYC or Washington DC there are more restrictions. But while I can't be sure, I doubt you'd run into significant problems re: photographing BART.
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Old April 2nd, 2012, 07:35 AM   #369
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Back in December yours truly like many others had expressed our concerns with MTC's foolish & waistful scheme to relocate from Oakland to plusher digs in San Francisco at taxpayer expense. And so we're glad to see that the State Senate has taken up this matter. Let's hope that the MTC stays where it belongs, in the East Bay.

Bill approved by state Senate committee would halt Metropolitan Transportation Commission move until audit is complete

BYLINE: By Rick Hurd Contra Costa Times

SECTION: NEWS

A state Senate committee on Tuesday unanimously approved a bill that would stop a regional transit agency from spending any more public money on its plans to renovate its new headquarters in San Francisco until a state audit is completed.

Senate Bill 1545, authored by Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord, was approved 8-0 by a bipartisan committee. If approved by the full Senate and Assembly and signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown, the law would table the planned move by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission until the audit is complete.

The MTC wants to move its headquarters from Oakland to San Francisco and paid $93 million to purchase an old postal facility at 390 Main St. in San Francisco to serve as its regional headquarters.

DeSaulnier introduced the bill in December. The bill, if approved, would apply to the MTC, the Bay Area Toll Authority and to the Bay Area Headquarters Authority. The BAHA was created by MTC to make all decisions related to the move and voted in December to spend $1 million for "architectural and engineering services" for the new building.

In a news release, DeSaulnier said the BAHA "knew the potential move was being audited" and "decided to ignore the audit and to spend the money anyway."

"That decision need not be made worse by spending additional public funds without oversight provided by the audit," DeSaulnier said. "There is no risk in awaiting (the audit's) completion. ... It is the responsible thing to do."

The audit will determine whether it is legal to use bridge tolls to buy and renovate the building. The renovations are expected to cost $74 million.

MTC has said the headquarters will serve as regional headquarters for multi-governmental agencies, including the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and the Bay Conservation and Development Commission.
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Old April 2nd, 2012, 09:32 PM   #370
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Originally Posted by bayviews View Post
In cities NYC or Washington DC there are more restrictions. But while I can't be sure, I doubt you'd run into significant problems re: photographing BART.
Thank you very much

Unfortunately here in certain areas, such as: patio of parking lots, still need authorization.
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Old April 5th, 2012, 02:56 AM   #371
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What's a patio of parking lot, a café terrasse set in a car park?
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Old April 5th, 2012, 06:18 AM   #372
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anderson Reis View Post
Thank you very much

Unfortunately here in certain areas, such as: patio of parking lots, still need authorization.
Hope you'll be able to make it up here to photo BART!
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Old April 5th, 2012, 06:20 AM   #373
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BAY AREA TRANSIT CHIEFS OK DEAL TO SPLIT PROJECT'S COSTSBAY AREA INKS $1.5 BILLION DEAL TO ELECTRIFY CALTRAIN FOR HIGH-SPEED RAIL; State, local leaders will split $1.5 billion cost of electrifying Caltrain line
Contra Costa Times. Walnut Creek, Calif.: Mar 30, 2012. pg. B.12

Copyright Bay Area News Mar 30, 2012

By Mike Rosenberg

Bay Area transportation leaders on Wednesday approved the region's deal with the state to split the $1.5 billion cost to electrify the Caltrain line that would ultimately be shared with statewide bullet trains.

"It will be much-improved train service in the corridor and it allows us to get some relatively early benefits of the spending of the high-speed rail funds without having to wait 10 to 20 years," San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed, whose administration helped draft the deal, said in an interview after the vote.

However, lingering questions remain over whether the new plan to run both Caltrain and state high-speed trains on an electric version of the existing two-track system is legal because voters in 2008 approved a high-speed rail line that assumed four tracks.

By sharing a pair of tracks with Caltrain, it could take California high-speed trains 45 minutes to travel between San Francisco and San Jose on their way to Los Angeles, instead of 30 minutes with four tracks. The slowdown also calls into question whether the state can meet its legal mandate to whisk bullet trains between San Francisco and Los Angeles in 2 hours, 40 minutes -- a requirement that relied on lightning-quick speeds in the Bay Area.

Engineers also were banking on up to 10 high-speed trains per hour in each direction with an expanded railroad.

But with fewer tracks, officials say, six Caltrains would run each hour, leaving room for just two to four high-speed trains in the Bay Area. With slower trip times and a reduction in service, the rail line's ability to attract riders could be hindered, leading to a possible violation of the law that requires the rail line to break even and avoid a tax subsidy.

Lastly, the measure voters approved requires the new system to reach the new Transbay Terminal in downtown San Francisco, and critics have questioned whether sharing the existing Caltrain corridor is enough to meet that criteria.

The California High-Speed Rail Authority refused to say whether the railroad will ultimately be expanded to four tracks, saying specifics will be unveiled in a final business plan due next week, though its attorneys maintain using two tracks would be legal. Peninsula officials aren't buying the two-track plan as permanent, however.

"They're playing a very devious game here, telling people who want to hear that it's going to meet the time requirements that it's going to be a four-track system, and telling people on the Peninsula it's going to be a two-track system," said attorney Stuart Flashman, who represents Peninsula cities that have sued over the bullet train project. "And obviously it can't be both."

Still, officials around the Bay Area touted the smaller, two-track project as a compromise meant to lower the total cost of the $100 billion high-speed railroad and diminish the damages to Peninsula communities along the corridor.

For cash-strapped Caltrain, it means lower operating costs and more frequent service.

Wednesday's "action represents the first step in what will eventually be a great leap forward for transit on the Peninsula," Caltrain CEO Mike Scanlon said in a statement.

The unanimous vote by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission represents one half of the political deal released last week. The Bay Area will contribute $750"0/00million, mostly from federal grants earmarked for transit construction and tax revenue from San Francisco, San Mateo and Santa Clara counties.

On April 5, the rail authority board is set to approve its half of the deal to kick in $706"0/00million in state bond funds, subject to approval by a divided Legislature as early as this June. Electric Caltrain service could open some six years after lawmakers approve the funds, with state bullet trains coming a decade or so later if funds can be secured to extend the tracks to San Jose from the starting point in the Central Valley.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 12:53 AM   #374
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Yes, when I go to San Francisco I will photograph the BART and I will show you here. These other information are very interesting as well.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 01:10 AM   #375
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God I hope Caltrain gets electrified.

There is no other rail corridor outside of Northeast thats electrified. With the exception of Metra Electric route and South Shore line route.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 05:16 AM   #376
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And the Marc Penn Line.
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Old April 8th, 2012, 08:16 AM   #377
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God I hope Caltrain gets electrified.

There is no other rail corridor outside of Northeast thats electrified. With the exception of Metra Electric route and South Shore line route.
Glad to hear that the Jack Kevorkian Memorial Express may be juiced up.

Hopefully with overhead catenary?

Whatever, please NO third rails! Now that would extract a truly gruesome toll.

Seriously though, I love CT. It’s the best & most comfortable rail system here.

Electrification can only make it even better!
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Old April 9th, 2012, 12:03 AM   #378
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Why don't you like 3rd rail? It works on many commuter services in places like southern England and Metro NY doesn't it?
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Old April 9th, 2012, 04:59 AM   #379
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And the Marc Penn Line.
MARC Penn Line is in the Northeast
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Old April 9th, 2012, 05:06 AM   #380
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Why don't you like 3rd rail? It works on many commuter services in places like southern England and Metro NY doesn't it?
Third Rail would be fine in most circumstances. However, consider the particular problem, a very sad one, that Caltrain has faced:

For the Engineer, a Death on the Tracks Means Horrifying Memories; [National Desk]
Zusha Elinson. New York Times. (Late Edition (East Coast)). New York, N.Y.:

Copyright New York Times Company Dec 11, 2011

The number of deaths is spiking this year on the tracks of the 77-mile Caltrain commuter line between San Francisco and Gilroy. With the 15th and 16th fatalities taking place within an hour of each other on Dec. 3, the total is nearing the 1995 high of 20 fatalities.

Many of the deaths are suicides, as 11 have been determined to be so far this year.

The engineers are the last people to see the victims alive. There is no way to stop a speeding 400-ton train in time. There is also no way to forget the sight or sound of death on the tracks.

One of those killed on Dec. 3, Donald Larson, 48, of San Jose, was hit by a northbound Baby Bullet in Palo Alto. A week earlier, Gregory Brown, 54, of Redwood City, died in the same spot in front of the same train. The same engineer hit them both, said Alex Cano, chairman of the local train engineers' union. No further details have been released about their deaths.

Less than an hour after Mr. Larson died, Jayne Cox, 27, of Folsom, was killed by a southbound train north of the Menlo Park station. The incident is being investigated as a suicide.

Christine Dunn, a Caltrain spokeswoman, said the deaths had an affect on everyone at the agency, from the engineers to the people who answer calls from passengers. "This is why the agency is heavily involved in community suicide prevention efforts that make a proactive effort to deal with the underlying causes of this complex problem," she said.

According to papers published in psychiatry journals, engineers who witness death on the tracks -- suicide or not -- are susceptible to post-traumatic stress disorder and the conditions that come with it: anxiety, insomnia and depression.

"The issue here is the profound amount of helplessness at the moment of impact," said Elana Newman, a psychology professor at the University of Tulsa specializing in responses to traumatic life events. "The core aspect of trauma is you see it and there's nothing you can do, and that's the part that's the most problematic."

It was a sunny Easter Sunday five years ago when Sean Morgan, driving a train into a San Francisco tunnel, saw something lying on the tracks. At first he thought it was debris. "But then," he said, "the person looked up, and it felt like he looked right at me -- just eyes as big as dinner plates."

Mr. Morgan pulled the emergency brake, but the train continued 800 feet before it stopped. Mr. Morgan had experienced a suicide on the tracks before, but this death of a homeless man stuck with him. It was the eyes, he said, and the sound.

"I'd hear the sound when I'd try to go sleep," Mr. Morgan said.

Although Caltrain has spent millions of dollars in suicide prevention, reaching out to local communities, and erecting fences and signs along the tracks, Mr. Morgan's experience is not unusual. Mr. Morgan, who has been a Caltrain engineer since 1996, said that of all the other old-timers he knows, only one had not hit and killed someone on the tracks. New hires to the line, which is operated by Amtrak, are told that it is a matter of when, not if.

Amtrak has a system for dealing with the incidents. Engineers get three days off and can take more time if needed. They receive calls from a professional counselor and a volunteer peer counselor.

Bruce Shelton, a Caltrain conductor for 15 years, became a volunteer counselor after he experienced two fatalities in 10 days. It is the conductor's grim duty to find the body or what is left of it. "My second one was a suicide," Mr. Shelton said. "When I went out to determine what the status was, I found a landscape quite literally of body parts."

"You feel sadness," he added. "Any loss of life is tragic, especially as the result of a suicide. Somewhere along the line, someone just missed a cry for help."

Not every engineer gets over the sadness. Mr. Cano, the union chairman, said that one engineer had a teardrop tattooed under his eye after his train hit and killed a toddler who had wandered onto the tracks.

"It was so traumatizing to him; it totally changed him," Mr. Cano said.
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