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Old October 20th, 2011, 02:09 AM   #761
scalatrava89
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I agree with Tonks. I'm all in favor of a mass advisement building, but what will it look like when the screens are turned off? A massive black structure will look very odd.
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Old October 20th, 2011, 12:28 PM   #762
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I agree with Tonks. I'm all in favor of a mass advisement building, but what will it look like when the screens are turned off? A massive black structure will look very odd.
You mean something like the IMAX Cinema at Waterloo? That could be covered in digital advertising and still look good when they are switched off.

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Old October 20th, 2011, 01:34 PM   #763
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The concept is good, but the design itself needs work. The more circular IMAX looks better, but would probably need to be taller and devoid of ads on the first couple of levels.
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Old October 21st, 2011, 04:19 AM   #764
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I don't have a problem with the ads, it's more of the odd shape the building is. What's wrong with it being perfectly circular in shape?
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Old October 21st, 2011, 10:26 AM   #765
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looks like the architects AHMM 'yawn' are doing lords instead of Herzog de meuron



http://www.bdonline.co.uk/news/ahmm-...026484.article
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Old October 21st, 2011, 02:00 PM   #766
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that business that has cleverly managed to exploit the design weakness of our planning system?
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Old October 21st, 2011, 02:52 PM   #767
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Cities stand or fall on mediocrity
21 October 2011
By Owen Hatherley

It’s a truism that in any era the majority of architecture is not very good — uncomfortable though this may be in an age when preserved back-to-backs in Leeds excite the praise of Simon Jenkins and every dilapidated Georgian street has a preservation order and a practically criminal price tag slapped on it.

Every generation, however, manages to get very angry about its own standard of not-very-goodness. In the 1930s critics could hardly bear to look at the “bypass Tudor” that ribboned its way across south-east England; in the 1960s system-built towers caused the same ire. Now the slatted wood ‘n’ barcode facade style is our standard of not-very-good, although many have spent the last two decades trying to pretend it was iconic, vibrant and able to single-handedly transform the fortunes of post-industrial cities.

There are however two quite distinct types of not-very-good, and here things get complicated. The reason why the most mediocre speculative Georgian/ Regency terraces of north London are so obsessed over is partly because the standard of mediocrity had certain virtues. Some of these were negative virtues in comparison with what came before (wooden shacks) and after (Victoriana). It was mediocrity, but coherent mediocrity, well-proportioned mediocrity, a mediocrity that had some notion of urbanity, mediocrity with nice high windows, at least for those who weren’t servants. It came with some notion of what a city was - a dense, urban entity where some sort of standard was necessary. This doesn’t make the average stucco and brick block in Holloway worthy of outrageous sums, but it means it isn’t completely valueless.

A similar argument could be made about the equally speculative tenements of Glasgow and Edinburgh, which still provide some of the most memorable and consistent urban townscapes in the UK. Municipal flats in London, Coventry, Sheffield and elsewhere also had a general standard of worthwhile mediocrity.

We are however quite clearly in a period of much less worthwhile mediocrity. The reason for this, put simply, is mediocrity in denial. Every fifth-rate block of flats thinks of itself as a little icon. All the stylistic devices — the barcodes, the patterns, the mix of materials — are designed as subterfuge, ways of masking bulk, unintentionally funny, conformist attempts at individualism and shouting down the neighbours.

That’s what lies behind the curious hostility that emerges whenever British eyes light on an example of rectilinear, blank, well-detailed, slightly boring north European architecture. The same words always come out — so bleak, so totalitarian. Fenestration that isn’t staggered or patterned inspires terror. The unspoken assumption is that the townscape of contemporary Britain, with its blaring colours, tacked-on bits and bobs and general crapness is somehow more humane and “vibrant”. But architectural celebrity notwithstanding, cities are defined by how good their boring buildings are; how interesting their standard of mediocrity is.
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Old October 21st, 2011, 08:28 PM   #768
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Terrace is not what Id call urban, tenements on the other hand...
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Old October 24th, 2011, 01:37 PM   #769
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^ There's virtually no difference given that most terraces have been subdivided into flats, and become de facto apartment buildings.
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Old October 25th, 2011, 11:01 AM   #770
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The Corp of London is looking for views on the Bank Junction.

Common theme so far is that it’s to traffic dominated and needs a rethink.

Feel free to add comments as it might persuade them to do something about the junction.


http://www.bankarea.co.uk/
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Old October 25th, 2011, 11:14 AM   #771
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El_Greco View Post
Terrace is not what Id call urban, tenements on the other hand...
Not necessarilly, many of the Portsmouth Terraces, which are up to 6-7 floors in places (we're a dense city here) have been subdivided into apartments which works great for people like me, but many of the smaller terraces - unconverted - provide the best accomadation to keep families in the city.
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Old October 25th, 2011, 11:11 PM   #772
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kerouac1848 View Post
Surprised no one has posted this:






http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/...t-office-block


It's funny because a few years ago I was walking through Old Street and thought that the roundabout would look good with a large cylinder tower with video ads, although I imagined it taller and thinner and more circular.

I think the concept is great, could establish the area as a gateway esp. with the other new developments. The only thing is there should be a broader package of improvements at street level. This pic shows it just plonked above the station. I was wondering if Tfl could get significant air rights from this to redevelop this 70s/80s throw back of a station.
Very squat and brutalist, and crass in its advertising spacing. I'd prefer tall cylindrical towers like in Japan.

Might aswell put a billboard up, as opposed to a 'building'.
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Old October 29th, 2011, 01:53 AM   #773
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'Octopus' building at Chiswick Roundabout gets green-light
Oct 28 2011 By Robert Cumber

AN EYE-CATCHING building dubbed the 'Octopus' will lay down its tentacles beside the M4 in Chiswick after getting the green light. The 50-metre tall, 5,000m2 office block by Chiswick Roundabout was finally approved by members of Hounslow Council's sustainable development committee (SDC) last Thursday (October 27). The building will be cloaked in an LED 'shroud', on which the owners plan to display adverts and artwork. It will also include a rooftop garden and public viewing gallery.

The proposals were originally rejected by the council in April last year after officers raised concerns giant advertising screens on the building could distract drivers on the M4 and the Great West Road.

However, developer London & Bath Estates' appeal was approved last November by the Planning Inspectorate. Officers had recommended the latest plans for refusal, claiming the building would 'be harmful to the quality of the surrounding area', including Kensington and Chelsea Cemetery, which it will overlook.

However, Councillor Steve Curran, vice chairman of the committee, said: "Members felt it was an iconic building. There were more than 500 letters of support, Brentford Chamber of Commerce wanted it and we felt it woyld bring jobs and regeneration to the area. Kim Gottlieb, managing director of London & Bath Estates, said: "For one of the world's greatest cities, a truly iconic building to mark the entrance along its primary transport route is long overdue. "When one of the councillors said 'it's bold, it's brash, it's in your face' I thought thank goodness someone's got it. "This is meant to be a 24-hour, modern, vibrant, top-three world capital city. Let's give it the architecture it deserves. "The Octopus will create a point of focus and attract interest in this part of London, creating jobs and providing an economic boost at a time when this is sorely needed."

A spokesman for the developer said the building would provide 350 jobs when completed. He added that the design had won the backing of both London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Design Council CABE. Construction is set to start in the second half of next year.

http://www.hounslowchronicle.co.uk/w...9642-29680564/
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Old October 29th, 2011, 02:50 AM   #774
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Langur View Post
^ There's virtually no difference given that most terraces have been subdivided into flats, and become de facto apartment buildings.
There is difference between this -

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


and this -

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Mansion block/tenement is more urban and suitable for a city than a terrace.
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Last edited by El_Greco; October 29th, 2011 at 01:04 PM.
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Old October 29th, 2011, 04:02 PM   #775
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El_Greco View Post
Mansion block/tenement is more urban and suitable for a city than a terrace.
So you think NYC and Amsterdam have got it wrong?

image hosted on flickr






Brownstones and canal houses make up a significant percentage of those cities' housing stock.
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Old October 29th, 2011, 09:58 PM   #776
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LazyOaf View Post
'Octopus' building at Chiswick Roundabout gets green-light
Oct 28 2011 By Robert Cumber

AN EYE-CATCHING building dubbed the 'Octopus' will lay down its tentacles beside the M4 in Chiswick after getting the green light. The 50-metre tall, 5,000m2 office block by Chiswick Roundabout was finally approved by members of Hounslow Council's sustainable development committee (SDC) last Thursday (October 27). The building will be cloaked in an LED 'shroud', on which the owners plan to display adverts and artwork. It will also include a rooftop garden and public viewing gallery.

The proposals were originally rejected by the council in April last year after officers raised concerns giant advertising screens on the building could distract drivers on the M4 and the Great West Road.

However, developer London & Bath Estates' appeal was approved last November by the Planning Inspectorate. Officers had recommended the latest plans for refusal, claiming the building would 'be harmful to the quality of the surrounding area', including Kensington and Chelsea Cemetery, which it will overlook.

However, Councillor Steve Curran, vice chairman of the committee, said: "Members felt it was an iconic building. There were more than 500 letters of support, Brentford Chamber of Commerce wanted it and we felt it woyld bring jobs and regeneration to the area. Kim Gottlieb, managing director of London & Bath Estates, said: "For one of the world's greatest cities, a truly iconic building to mark the entrance along its primary transport route is long overdue. "When one of the councillors said 'it's bold, it's brash, it's in your face' I thought thank goodness someone's got it. "This is meant to be a 24-hour, modern, vibrant, top-three world capital city. Let's give it the architecture it deserves. "The Octopus will create a point of focus and attract interest in this part of London, creating jobs and providing an economic boost at a time when this is sorely needed."

A spokesman for the developer said the building would provide 350 jobs when completed. He added that the design had won the backing of both London Mayor Boris Johnson and the Design Council CABE. Construction is set to start in the second half of next year.

http://www.hounslowchronicle.co.uk/w...9642-29680564/
My god. Awful. I'm stunned.
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Old October 29th, 2011, 10:15 PM   #777
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Originally Posted by kerouac1848 View Post
So you think NYC and Amsterdam have got it wrong?
New York is a high rise city, almost exclusively so. As for Amsterdam, it was developed during the Dutch Golden Age - a completely different time from the industrial 19th C. It never saw explosion in population that British, American and German cities saw, hence Amsterdams current appearance.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 01:37 PM   #778
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New York is a high rise city, almost exclusively so.
You've obviously never been to New York, or never bothered to leave Manhattan if you did. Outside most of Manhattan, parts of the South Bronx and a very small part of Brooklyn and Queens, NY is overwhelmingly low-rise and a lot of of that is terracing (or row housing). That's most of the city. Manhattan represents just 7.5% of the city's total land area and 19% of its population. So to say it is 'almost exclusively' high rise is totally crap. Terracing is also common in Boston and Philadelphia from what I remember.

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As for Amsterdam, it was developed during the Dutch Golden Age - a completely different time from the industrial 19th C. It never saw explosion in population that British, American and German cities saw, hence Amsterdams current appearance.
Then why did the dutch rebuild terracing during the post-war population boom in their flattened cities? Why are they still building them today? The Netherlands almost certainly has more terracing than any other country in Europe.

Terracing/townhouses/row-housing/whatever you call it is just as suitable for an urban environment as mansion blocks or residential towers and skyscrapers. They all play their part in the mix. To restrict it to the latter is being dogmatic and unpractical.

Last edited by kerouac1848; October 30th, 2011 at 01:42 PM.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 02:21 PM   #779
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To restore their cities to the pre-war appearance? Does it really matter? Low-rise terrace is simply not suitable for city-centre/inner city ; its supposed to be dense and high - Paris, Madrid, Barcelona, Vienna etc etc. This way you save space (which is a finite resource) and create an exciting urban environment, instead of one which pretends to be a quaint village. You can have your terraces in the suburbs.
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Old October 30th, 2011, 02:39 PM   #780
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Originally Posted by El_Greco View Post
To restore their cities to the pre-war appearance? Does it really matter? Low-rise terrace is simply not suitable for city-centre/inner city ; its supposed to be dense and high - Paris, Madrid, Barcelona, Vienna etc etc. This way you save space (which is a finite resource) and create an exciting urban environment, instead of one which pretends to be a quaint village. You can have your terraces in the suburbs.
The Dutch still build terraces today and terracing is often dense (and hence does save space) and I never said anything about the city centre since you used the general term 'urban'. A friend of mine from Antwerp lives in an apartment building no higher than many terraces here, whilst plenty of blocks in Paris are no taller than 4/5 floors. Villages aren't stuffed with London-style townhouses either whilst the suburbs should ideally be mostly detached housing (look at new builds close to Brussels).

Anyway, you're clearly blinded by your own bizarre ideology on how cities should look, so it's a waste of time trying to point out your flawed thinking.
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