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Old November 2nd, 2010, 12:22 AM   #21
dark_shadow1
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It's pretty obvious that the Pantheon was heavily influenced by the Parthenon or at least by the architecture which is presented at its best by the Parthenon.
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 01:09 AM   #22
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But if we take Semper's theory on typology we have to say that the "pronao ahead of a central space under a dome" type, which has been reproduced uncountable times, cannot be made start from the parthenon, while the pantheon is a rightful specimen.
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 01:57 AM   #23
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OMG people,
1) Parthenon is the perfect specimen of Ancient classic architecture, combined with a location that made it prominent ambassador of ancient grandeur and thus is mentioned as the prime archetype
2)Pantheon is mentioned not for the facade but for the use of the dome, again not as the first such building, but as the perfect specimen which was in turn another prime archetype

Annibale, the "pronao ahead of a central space under a dome" is a Orthodox church type, which preceded Renaissance for half a millenia and structurally is very different from the Pantheon (Four pillars, united by 4 arcs, that curve to from a circle where a dome is placed, as opposed to the Pantheon which is essentially based on the Greek "Tholos" ). In such a case, Hagia Sophia is the forerunner
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 03:51 PM   #24
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Quote:
It's pretty obvious that the Pantheon was heavily influenced by the Parthenon or at least by the architecture which is presented at its best by the Parthenon.
And Parthenon was heavily influenced by the Urartian temple of Musasir, this ancient temple has been discovered in the northwest of Iran: http://assyriatimes.com/engine/modul...p?storyid=3105

An Assyrian bas-relief from Khorsabad (Dur Sharrukin) which depicts this temple to commemorate Assyrian victory over Urartians:



You can read more about it here: http://www.armenianhighland.com/musasir/ah.html

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Old November 2nd, 2010, 04:26 PM   #25
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Pretty much everything stems from this kind of monument:


pic from wikipedia

This particular example is Poulnabrone Dolmen in Ireland, although similar structures can be found throughout Europe, Middle East and Asia.
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 04:30 PM   #26
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^Ya lots of these megaliths in India from prehistoric times. They are found on every continent I think.
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 06:04 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piltup Man View Post
Pretty much everything stems from this kind of monument.
Yes probably, but this thread is not about "where famous monuments are becoming from", but which one is the most important!
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 06:30 PM   #28
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Yes probably, but this thread is not about "where famous monuments are becoming from", but which one is the most important!
I don't think there can be an answer to that.
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Old November 2nd, 2010, 08:38 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piltup Man View Post
I don't think there can be an answer to that.
I gave the answer in the first post, that is the Great Mosque at Isfahan.

Why?

Becuase Iran is called the crossroads of civilizations, you can find historical monuments from most of the nations of the world in this country, for example about Europeans, it can be interesting to know in the last millenium some Rus and Vikings conquered Gorgan in the northeast of the country, Normans and Franks captured some northwestern parts, Portuguese, Spaniards, Dutch and British ruled in the different parts of southern Iran for almost a long time, ...

As you read about Great Mosque of Isfahan: http://www.orientalarchitecture.com/...ame-mosque.php and http://www.irantour.org/Iran/mosque/...20Isfahan.html Every architectural age of Iran (except the most decadent) can be observed and studied here.

In the last millenium different Arab, Persian, Turk, Turkmen, Tatar and Mongol rulers of Iran have worked to build this mosque. The mosque has eight entrance gates, the oldest one on Hatef street is a manifestation of brilliant craftsmanship. The small platforms on the right - hand side of the entrance corridor belong to Buyid era the 11th Century.

The southern portico leads into some of the oldest parts of the mosque which were built in the Abbasid period from 8th to 10th Century. The foundations for this porch were laid during the Turkic Seljuk period at the start of the 12th Century by Nizam Al Mulk, although there was certainly an older building of some kind here as evidenced by the walls which have been found below the current floor of the interior and which were being excavated in April 1999. The roof was rebuilt by Turkman king Uzun Hasan in 1475/6 according to an inscription in the interior and the two minarets were added at the same time. The marble plinths and some of the raised mosaic tilework inside the eivan date from Uzun Hasan's time. Further extensive modifications took place under the Safvid king Shah Tahmasb in 16th Century.

On the northern side of the great Western Eivan of the mosque there is an impressive portal which leads to the winter Prayer Gallery. The portal is of somewhat later date than the buildings behind it which probably date from 1310 according to the date on the magnificent stucco mihrab of Mongol king Oljeitu which forms the central feature, and dates from 1447. It was built by Imad ibn Muzaffar Varzaneh, during the reign of Sultan Muhammad Bahadur, one of Shahrokh's grandchildren, possibly as an act of piety following his grandfather's death in 1447. The inscription in mosaic faience above the door reads as follows:

The least of slaves, Imad ibn Muzaffar Varzaneh ordered the construction of this broad structure to be the winter mosque of this noble jami' during the reign of Sultan Muhammad Bahadur ... Shavval 851. Written by Seyyed Mahmud Naqqash

As you enter the mosque by the South Eastern entrance you are plunged into a series of cloisters which are punctuated by open and closed vaults giving strong contrasts between light and dark and imposing a need for spatial and ocular re-adjustment. Here we find a magnificent example of the "mystical mathematics of the City of Heaven" of which Sir Thomas Browne wrote.
The mystical mathematics were well known to the Sufi craftsmen who designed this part of the mosque. Their system of mathematics was called abjad, and provided a conceptual springboard from which the diverse and inventive geometrical patterns in the roof vaults were derived. Originally it was probably a huge library, and this hypothesis is borne out by the presence of lampholders in part of the cloisters, but after the siege of Isfahan by Toghril Begh, during which large parts of the mosque were ransacked to provide winter fuel, it was rebuilt in its present form.
It was amongst these strange cloisters that one of the greatest Iranians of all time, Nizam al-Mulk, the vizier of Malik Shah and friend and patron of Omar Khayyam, chose to erect his prayer chamber.

The complex vaulting of the 12th century Eastern eivan, was added by Shah Suleiman in 1689 as indicated by the tiled inscription. There is some confusion as to whether this gallery is the winter gallery referred to in the inscription of the doorway. The low sprung vaults which are said to be based on the tents of the mongols are unparalleled anywhere else in Timurid architecture. Each of the eighteen vaults which make up the gallery was formerly lit through an alabaster panel let into the centre of the arch, although this faint illumination has now been replaced by chandeliers and central heating has also been put in.
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Old November 3rd, 2010, 09:23 PM   #30
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I'm afraid the Great Mosque at Isfahan is just too new and too one-dimensional for the title. Hagia Sophia in this category is a more important architectural monument.
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Old November 4th, 2010, 01:39 AM   #31
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You have probably read about Hagia Sophia, for example World History, Volume 1 By William J. Duiker, Jackson J. Spielvogel, Page 209:

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Old November 4th, 2010, 02:46 AM   #32
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Dont flatter yourself, Cyrus, The Parthenon is a Greek building through and through. It is a stone version of a type of building that had been built in Greece since the time immemorial. Moreover The Parthenon was built at the time when Persian Empire was getting ever more aggressive and violent and centuries after The Greek rejection of anything Eastern.
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Old November 5th, 2010, 02:05 PM   #33
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Stonehenge.

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Old November 5th, 2010, 07:33 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LondonFox View Post
Stonehenge.

What makes it so special or, better, more special than other megalithic monuments, in the way that could be named as "world's most important architecture" ?
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Old November 6th, 2010, 02:52 PM   #35
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Obelisco - Buenos Aires

image hosted on flickr



: lo:

just a joke...
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Old November 11th, 2010, 01:26 AM   #36
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CANADIAN NATIONAL VIMY MEMORIAL, France



Regardless of political views, Remembrance Day is one occasion when we pause to reflect and pay respect to the dead.



In Flanders Fields

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


John McCrae

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Old November 11th, 2010, 01:27 AM   #37
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CANADIAN NATIONAL VIMY MEMORIAL, France

The front wall representing an impenetrable wall of defence


Sympathy of the Canadians for the Helpless


Breaking of the Swords


Cannons covered in laurel further symbolizing peace


Mother Canada mourning her dead


The stone sarcophagus representing Canada's war dead


The Spirit of Sacrifice passing the torch


The twin pylons representing France and Canada, partners in arms


Names of the missing
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Last edited by isaidso; November 11th, 2010 at 01:46 AM.
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Old November 11th, 2010, 01:50 AM   #38
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The Vimy Memorial is not the most famous, the oldest, or the most elaborate, but it's message is the most important. In its defense, I do find it one of the most beautiful structures in the world. I wish they'd build a replica of it in Canada.
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Old November 11th, 2010, 02:40 PM   #39
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Quote:
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The Vimy Memorial is not the most famous, the oldest, or the most elaborate, but it's message is the most important. In its defense, I do find it one of the most beautiful structures in the world. I wish they'd build a replica of it in Canada.
+ 1

Indeed, it looks really solemn and powerful. I really love the style...
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Old November 12th, 2010, 03:34 PM   #40
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+ 1

Indeed, it looks really solemn and powerful. I really love the style...
Hitler admired it so much he ordered his troops to protect it from damage during WW2.
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