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Old November 8th, 2007, 05:57 PM   #141
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Good that theyre getting rid of it.
Itll create a nice square in front of the station

Do you know whether theyll do anything to the King's Cross Thameslink station aswell?

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Old November 8th, 2007, 06:14 PM   #142
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King's Cross Thameslink won't be used from December as Thameslink trains are going from a new station under St Pancras. The future of the old station is undecided, but it may be converted into another entrance to King's Cross Tube station.
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Old November 8th, 2007, 06:29 PM   #143
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Right, thx.
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Old November 8th, 2007, 10:48 PM   #144
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Regular services between Paris-Nord, Bruxelles-Midi and London-St Pancrass should start on 17th november...but SNCF workers will start a no-limit strike on 14th november.
Strike is a national sport...
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Old November 9th, 2007, 02:04 AM   #145
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"The proposed routes would use eight times less land and half the vehicle fleet than conventional high-speed trains, it is claimed."

Eight times?
Maglev 10 m and wheel-HSR 80 m wide? Or what?
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Old November 9th, 2007, 04:05 AM   #146
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What is the strike over?
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Old November 9th, 2007, 10:51 AM   #147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Euklidisk View Post
"The proposed routes would use eight times less land and half the vehicle fleet than conventional high-speed trains it is claimed."

Eight times?
Maglev 10 m and wheel-HSR 80 m wide? Or what?
The autor considers that a Maglev system like Transrapid use an elevated track over the ground: so, it use less land. But for poeple who live here, there is no real difference. The big problem about maglev systems is the weather: wind and rain could make to vehicule go slower than expected.

If you reach 500 km/h, the main problem is the air resistance: a magnetic system must use more energy to keep is speed when an HSR can use inertia.
There are two way to reduce air resistance: climbing over 6 000 m (it's what we do everyday with planes) or using a tunnel like Swissmetro project...but the costs are awfull.
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Old November 9th, 2007, 12:05 PM   #148
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Let us not forget the noise such a vehicle makes at that speed...

This is from a layman's perspective, but does anyone know if there are any health risks associated from living near a maglev track? A bit like with electricity pylons?
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Old November 9th, 2007, 12:42 PM   #149
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I think it would be better to first get our current railway system running efficeintly rather than going for maglev i mean this must be a joke right. I took me nearly 9 hours to get from east coast of scotland to manchester never again will i be making that journey by train.
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Old November 9th, 2007, 02:02 PM   #150
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Quote:
If you reach 500 km/h, the main problem is the air resistance: a magnetic system must use more energy to keep is speed when an HSR can use inertia.

This is all pure speculation.
The Transrapid Maglev can use inertia as well, and they also tested it.
Furthermore they also tested the system with running speeds around 420 kmh in Emsland-Germany during snow, heavy rain and heavy wind.
And its running fine.

Furthermore, the air resistance is bigger, yes, but the aerodynamics of a maglev vehicle is much better, as you have a train body, that can be designed only considering the aerodynamic drag, while a concentional train needs wheels,bogies and pantographs.

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Old November 9th, 2007, 03:57 PM   #151
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pflo777 View Post
Furthermore, the air resistance is bigger, yes, but the aerodynamics of a maglev vehicle is much better, as you have a train body, that can be designed only considering the aerodynamic drag, while a concentional train needs wheels,bogies and pantographs.
Just one slight note - maglevs have bogies (as that's what the magnets are attached to it), but they meld with the body in a near-seamless way. The end result is pretty much as you explain though
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Old November 9th, 2007, 04:00 PM   #152
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asif iqbal View Post
I think it would be better to first get our current railway system running efficeintly rather than going for maglev i mean this must be a joke right. I took me nearly 9 hours to get from east coast of scotland to manchester never again will i be making that journey by train.
Firstly, can you use some punctuation? It's there for a reason.

Secondly, why are you basing one negative example as an indication of the rest of the network?
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Old November 9th, 2007, 06:45 PM   #153
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GNU View Post
Good that theyre getting rid of it.
Itll create a nice square in front of the station

Do you know whether theyll do anything to the King's Cross Thameslink station aswell?

The Thameslink Station is being replaced by a new station under St Pancras due to open next month.
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Old November 9th, 2007, 06:47 PM   #154
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Cool. St. Pancras is a beautiful station, it's a nice way to get into Britain in style.
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Old November 9th, 2007, 08:56 PM   #155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Firstly, can you use some punctuation? It's there for a reason.

Secondly, why are you basing one negative example as an indication of the rest of the network?
What is wrong with my ppppunctuatiooon?

It was my experience so i thought i would share it with everyone else! clearly u must be one of the train company owners right either that or u are very insensitive about UK trains!
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Old November 10th, 2007, 01:23 AM   #156
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They should build buidings on elevated stilts, then they wouldn't use up so much land.
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Old November 10th, 2007, 03:02 AM   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Let us not forget the noise such a vehicle makes at that speed...

This is from a layman's perspective, but does anyone know if there are any health risks associated from living near a maglev track? A bit like with electricity pylons?
Not much from what I have heard for Transrapid system.
About the same as a celluar phone.

The Japanese system generates a much higher electro-magnetic field but again it is still in the testing stage and shielding will probably be made mandatory in construction of tracks.
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Old November 10th, 2007, 12:11 PM   #158
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Meet me at St Pancras
St Pancras subheading heady hedy heading heading
Mark Palmer hails a reborn landmark: not just a station, more the place to be

10 November 2007
The Daily Telegraph

'Look, look,'' says the hard-hatted man from London & Continental Railways, "Here it comes. Now isn't that an undeniably impressive sight?'' Well, yes, it's not bad as dress rehearsals go: the new High Speed 1 Eurostar sliding into St Pancras and coming to a halt a few paces from Paul Day's nine-metre high sculpture of a young couple embracing under the huge replica Dent clock at the end of the concourse.

On Tuesday, the Queen stood on this same platform to formally open the station. Next Wednesday, it will be all systems go as the new service's trains start to ping-pong back and forth in little more than two hours between Paris and London, just under two hours between London and Brussels and a mere 90 minutes between London and Lille.

Will the station mark the beginning of a new golden age of travel? St Pancras is already being compared with New York's Grand Central, one of the world's most romantic meeting places (think Cary Grant in North by Northwest). Not so much a train station from where you begin or end a journey, but a destination in itself. "Meet me at St Pancras'' has a certain ring to it, a call to romantics everywhere.

And, like Grand Central, with its Oyster Bar and gourmet food market, there will be plenty on offer for hungry lovers. I can't wait to see the expression on the faces of a certain kind of French man or woman as they disembark in London feeling peckish. For the first time at a station in this country, they'll be spoilt for choice.

Some may choke on their prejudices as they see waiters and waitresses scurrying about with trays of food. One or two might need to pinch themselves. And where better to do so than at the world's longest Champagne bar, which runs almost the entire length of the station, behind a glass partition on Platform One. Here, they can perch and observe the "fine dining'' restaurant operated by Searcy, where there will also be a bar, a bistro and a private room.

Some new arrivals might be tempted to head for the Betjeman Arms, a gastro pub operated by trendy Geronimo Inns on the south-east corner of William Henry Barlow's wondrous, and wondrously restored, engine shed. The menu should make them feel at home. It will be a radical departure from normal train station fare in Britain. That means chopped steak tartare, eggs Benedict, potted shrimp and wild mushrooms on toast for starters, followed by a choice of smoked haddock with poached egg and hollandaise, grilled rib-eye steak with lots of Béarnaise, roast cod sitting on white beans and chorizo, linguine with clams and so on.

To follow? The visitors from France could do worse than pop downstairs for a browse around the farmers' market modelled on the now iconic Borough Market near London Bridge. It's not clear how often the market will be held, but stand by for oysters from Whitstable, lamb from Herefordshire and tomatoes from the Isle of Wight. On certain days, a string quartet will add some mood music for shoppers and travellers alike. There will be space for art, street performers, banks of computer terminals, flower stalls and shops of every hue.

It all so nearly wasn't to be. Not long ago, bulldozers were parked on the forecourt outside the Midland Grand Hotel, ready to destroy what is now regarded as the greatest monument of the Gothic Revival in Britain.

In 1966, the year England were victorious in the World Cup, the nationalised British Railways were admitting defeat over what to do with both Barlow's station and George Gilbert Scott's 300-room hotel, which was more or less abandoned after 1935. Built in 1873, Scott's masterpiece (the first to have lifts, or "ascending rooms'', and a famous Ladies' Smoking Room) benefited from the finest materials, but was short of bathrooms. Then it became short of guests - and woefully short of admirers.

"It's a miracle that the building is still there at all,'' says Simon Thurley, chief executive of English Heritage. "It became a target for those who hated Victorian architecture and could very easily have been replaced with a squat box, like the one at Euston station.

"The story of St Pancras is a lesson to us all. It gives a lie to the idea that you have to choose between old and new. These great buildings are remarkably flexible and are crying out to be used. We owe a huge debt to those who stood up and rescued St Pancras in the 1960s.''

No one stood taller than Sir John Betjeman, the late poet laureate, even though at one point he seemed resigned to defeat when describing the building as "too beautiful and too romantic to survive''. Then the cavalry arrived in the form of the Victorian Society, then led by Nikolaus Pevsner. Betjeman rallied, urging the nation to admire "that cluster of towers and pinnacles seen from Pentonville Hill and outlined against a foggy sunset, and the great arc of the train shed, gaping to devour the incoming engines''.

A year later, St Pancras was Grade 1 listed, elevating it to the same status as Canterbury Cathedral and Windsor Castle. A specially commissioned statue of Betjeman by Martin Jennings, complete with trademark trilby, now stands at the top of one of four large slots cut through Barlow's platform deck, allowing natural light to flood into the undercroft for the first time (with 18,000 new panes of glass in the roof, it's the first time for more than 100 years that light of any kind has been seen at the station) and giving access from one floor to the other for passengers and the visiting public.

Ah, the visiting public - the crucial unknown component in this pounds 800 million equation and a good reason why you won't find a Burger King, a McDonald's or an Upper Crust anywhere in this steel and glass-ceiling architectural cathedral.

"We will know we've been successful when people start coming to St Pancras and have no intention of catching a train,'' says Mike Luddy, project director for London & Continental Railways, the company responsible for the new Channel Tunnel rail link. "That's why, in addition to the quality of the retail outlets, we will have four times more staff per customer than any other station, and why the cleaning contract will be similar to that you would draw up for an indoor shopping centre. To say we are raising the bar is an understatement.''

Let's not forget that some 50 million people a year will use the station in one form or another. It's not really one station, but four converging stations: Eurostar, Midland Mainline, First Capital Connect (formerly Thameslink) and King's Cross St Pancras underground (London's busiest tube station), with the high-speed Kent commuter service set to join the party in 2009.

All 67 retail outlets have been filled. On the upper floor, directly under Barlow's roof (the largest single span structure in the world when it opened in 1868 and still the tallest and widest train shed in the country), will be the Betjeman Arms, a branch of Carluccio's, the 1868 Champagne Bar and Searcy's restaurant and brasserie. Further north, there's a West Cornwall Pasty shop and the Camden Food deli.

At one point, it looked as if Caprice Holdings (The Ivy, Scott's, the Caprice) would win the contract for the station's main restaurant. Then the Galvin brothers (Galvin at Windows) came in with a bid, before Searcy persuaded Luddy and others that their experience at the Royal Opera House, the Barbican and the National Portrait Gallery would be useful at St Pancras.

At the front of the station, the hotel, which appeared in both the Spice Girls' first video, Wannabe, and in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, will be operated by the Marriott group. When it opens in 2009, it will have 245 rooms, a spa, ballroom and some 70 apartments managed jointly with the Manhattan Loft Corporation.

Take the stairs or lift (if approaching from street level, you will walk through magnificent double oak doors with old brass fixtures and fittings) to the undercroft and this is where you check in for the Eurostar. The cedar wood floor is thought to be the quietest possible wood floor that can stand up to constant traffic.

The undercroft once stored barrels of beer. In fact, Barlow said that the "length of a beer barrel became the unit of measure upon which all the arrangements of this floor were based''. Barlow's 850 columns, which allowed the platforms to be constructed 18 feet above street level (each column able to withstand 55 tons in weight) have been gloriously preserved. They give the shops (which all have screens that show the train times) a gravitas they would not normally get in a shopping arcade.

The biggest unit, Marks & Spencer apart, will be occupied by Foyles bookshop, a symbol for everything the new St Pancras is about - lingering, browsing and, as Thurley puts it, "just feeling privileged to be standing in a building that's like no other on Earth''.

Thomas Pink, LK Bennett, Monsoon, La Senza, Oliver Bonas, Neal's Yard Remedies, Hamleys - the list goes on. The closer you walk to the Midland Mainline trains the more you will notice familiar high street names: M&S Simply Food, Pret a Manger, Caffè Nero, Le Pain Quotidien, Starbucks, Yo! Sushi.

These 21st-century grazing grounds will not stand the test of time like St Pancras. Indeed, some traditionalists might struggle with the idea that workers have unearthed 7,000 bodies from the ground just north of the station during the project, even though all have been carefully identified and reinterred in East Finchley cemetery. Yet the words of the historian Jack Simmonds still seem appropriate today and will be felt more keenly than ever as St Pancras once more becomes a living national landmark:

"The station distils the very essence of mid-Victorian power: for it is the most magnificent commercial building of the age, reflecting more completely than any other its economic achievement, its triumphant technology, its assurance and pride, suffused by romance.''

* The Dent clock was sold to an American for pounds 250 in the 1970s, but workmen dropped it during its removal. An engine driver named Roland Hoggard bagged up the bits, which were crucial in making an exact replica. Hoggard, now 91, was at the station's opening ceremony.

* The restoration used more than 16 million new bricks, all designed to look exactly like the old ones.

* 300,000 Welsh slates, from the same Ffestiniog quarry that produced the original ones, have been installed.

* 8,000 jobs were created during the construction.

* 18,000 individual panes of self-cleaning glass have been used to form the new roof.

* 18 layers of paint were removed to reveal the original "Barlow Blue'' colour (some 20,000 litres of paint were used).

* 13 listed buildings were moved during construction.

* 190,000 miles of cable have been fitted.

* More than 1 million trees were planted during construction.

* It took 50 million man-hours to complete the project.

* Eurostar trains are the fastest (almost 200 mph) in the UK. The Hitachi "bullet trains'' will be the fastest (140mph) domestic trains in the UK.

* 1,000 bottles of Champagne were put on ice for the official re-opening by the Queen last Tuesday.

PLATFORM CHANGES

* Best place to meet
The foot of the 20-ton, pounds 1 million statue by Paul Day called, appropriately, The Meeting Place

* Best place to drink
The Betjeman Arms, with more than 30 foreign beers and plenty of British real ale

* Best place to eat
Searcy's private dining-room at the west of the station. There's space for up to 18

* Best place to people-watch
The 1868 Champagne bar beside Platform One

* Best place to buy books
Foyles (and be sure to look out for the oak doors and slate floor)

* Best place to show off your French
Crepe-affaire

* Best place to buy chocolates
Neuhaus Chocolates in the undercroft

* Best place for a birthday card
Paperchase

* Best place for toys
Hamleys

* Best place for sexy underwear
La Senza
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Old November 10th, 2007, 08:21 PM   #159
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Now... Can the rest of our rail network please be like this?
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Old November 11th, 2007, 06:08 AM   #160
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Maglev is significantly more energy-efficient than conventional HSR, and maintenance costs are much lower. Weighing the two options is akin to comparing nuclear power's capital expenditure with gas power's operational costs.
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