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Old July 27th, 2012, 03:12 AM   #261
L.A.F.2.
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Even though they weren't built pre-WWII doesn't mean they aren't art deco. If I showed someone who knows nothing about skyscrapers these against genuine New York art deco, they wouldn't know the difference. I was just showing some large buildings of the style that are being built still. Neo is just the prefix you add to the beginning of the style it is replicating at a later time.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 05:42 AM   #262
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.A.F.2. View Post
Even though they weren't built pre-WWII doesn't mean they aren't art deco. If I showed someone who knows nothing about skyscrapers these against genuine New York art deco, they wouldn't know the difference. I was just showing some large buildings of the style that are being built still. Neo is just the prefix you add to the beginning of the style it is replicating at a later time.
Actually I believe each building you referenced is considered postmodern, not art deco. There is a difference. I'm sure most people wouldn't recognize the difference, but probably most people on a site like this would.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 06:07 AM   #263
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Sorry, L.A.F.2. but those buildings are definitely Post Modern even though their style is a revival of Art Deco features, which is typical of Post Modernism, a revivalist style which pinched bits and pieces of past styles and stitched them into a new version, a practice that was sometimes successful, but more often than not was pretty awful if not downright vulgar visually and aesthetically (or esthetically in US).
The dates, 1990, etc., give it away if nothing else.

The last genuine Art Deco building in the world to be built is the former Maritime Services Board Building, now the MCA (Museum of Contemporary Art) in Sydney (Australia). It was designed in the late 1930s but due to WW2 its construction was delayed so it wasn't completed until some years later.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 08:51 AM   #264
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John McCormack Courthouse, Boston MA

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/masnyc/5060631551/

http://decoarchitecture.tumblr.com/p...and-courthouse
image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/aniko_attila/5632794629/
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Old July 27th, 2012, 09:34 AM   #265
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Paper Ninja: that is a Good One! Suggest you give basic details with pics such as architect and date if known, for odd bods like me who like to know and who can put them on the To Do list. I missed this one when I was in Boston some years ago, how I do not know!
***
Just realised that Art Deco also borrowed features and motifs from earlier styles such as Gothic, Egyptian, Roman, etc, but integrated them more successfully on the whole into a new style, so it too, is eclectic as is Post Modern and most C.19th architecture.

That isn't to say that some Post Modern buildings are not extremely successful as architecture: PPG in Pittsburg, AT&T/Sony in NY, General Foods HQ, Rye, NY, for example.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 12:29 PM   #266
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According to me, i only posted a few, the first was my personal top 5, the second was a selection from countries that arent the USA, but that building is great and i agree Detroit has some great art deco buildings i'd go with New York as the capital IMO
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Old July 27th, 2012, 03:09 PM   #267
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Seems like some think every old skyscraper is in Art Deco style.

These buildings (from the previous page) aren't Art Deco. They are neo-geothic.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 03:27 PM   #268
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Sorry, but they are Art Deco. As I pointed out just a post or two back, Art Deco was eclectic but managed, largely, to integrate various past styles into a new style.

It's not odd at all that every old skyscraper is Art Deco because the skyscraper was not developed until the late C.19th. - see Chicago School - and most of the first crop of skyscrapers wasn't built until the early C.20th. especially in the boom years of the 1920s when the Art Deco style was dominant in Europe, US & other Western countries with a few examples in Asia and Africa. The 1929 Wall Street Crash didn't suddenly stop construction and some continued to be built into the early 1930s, e.g., Chrysler & Empire State, as they were already committed to construction.
Helps if you know your architectural history.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 03:55 PM   #269
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brizer View Post
Sorry, but they are Art Deco. As I pointed out just a post or two back, Art Deco was eclectic but managed, largely, to integrate various past styles into a new style.
They same did every other style that integrated past style elements into modern buildings. Just like neo-gothic. Or are you saying that every building that borrowed style elements from the past is Art Deco?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brizer View Post
It's not odd at all that every old skyscraper is Art Deco because the skyscraper was not developed until the late C.19th. - see Chicago School - and most of the first crop of skyscrapers wasn't built until the early C.20th. especially in the boom years of the 1920s when the Art Deco style was dominant in Europe, US & other Western countries with a few examples in Asia and Africa. The 1929 Wall Street Crash didn't suddenly stop construction and some continued to be built into the early 1930s, e.g., Chrysler & Empire State, as they were already committed to construction.
Helps if you know your architectural history.
But the thing is: Not every old skyscraper is in Art Deco. The Chicago school buildings are example of old skyscraper that aren't built in Art Deco. Just like the three I posted aren't built in Art Deco either.

Perhaps you should read through what Art Deco actually is? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Deco
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Old July 27th, 2012, 04:08 PM   #270
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1. No. Read the text. That is quite a leap of reasoning from what I wrote to how you interpreted it.

2. Read some architectural history before forming opinion and put your ego aside when someone gives you some information that doesn't agree with what you think. Learn from it.

Galro, I am a history of art and architecture professional so maybe it's just possible that I have a fair idea of what I'm writing about & my intention is to give you better information as your assumptions are not correct. As useful as Wikipedia can be, it is not always the best source of information and I'm afraid my reading & learning is quite a lot more extensive and intensive than Wikipedia provides.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 04:33 PM   #271
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brizer View Post
1. No. Read the text. That is quite a leap of reasoning from what I wrote to how you interpreted it.

2. Read some architectural history before forming opinion and put your ego aside when someone gives you some information that doesn't agree with what you think. Learn from it.

Galro, I am a history of art and architecture professional so maybe it's just possible that I have a fair idea of what I'm writing about & my intention is to give you better information as your assumptions are not correct. As useful as Wikipedia can be, it is not always the best source of information and I'm afraid my reading & learning is quite a lot more extensive and intensive than Wikipedia provides.
Then please say why those neo-gothic buildings are Art Deco rather than just say "They are Art Deco and you're wrong". Could you please provide link to your extensive readings?

Perhaps you should write into these sites too given that they call the Tribune building (one of the three buildings above) neo-gothic:
http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/hood/hood.html
http://www.jitterbuzz.com/trib_tower.html
http://eng.archinform.net/projekte/4532.htm

And just btw: Art Deco wasn't dominant in the 1920s in Europe.

Last edited by Galro; July 27th, 2012 at 04:57 PM.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 05:02 PM   #272
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10 Light Street, Baltimore, MD

1929; 507ft.

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Bank of America Building - Baltimore MD 7627 by avi8tor4fn, on Flickr

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Baltimore Trust Building (aka Bank of America Bldg) - 10 Light Street, Baltimore, Maryland by Anomalous_A, on Flickr
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Old July 27th, 2012, 05:04 PM   #273
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Marine drive Mumbai,2nd longest stretch of art deco buildings in the world after Miami.




an old pic
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Old July 27th, 2012, 06:33 PM   #274
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Galro: you are just going to have to do some reading but start by reading what I actually wrote above considering terms such as 'eclectic'.

Quote: "Art Deco was eclectic but managed, largely, to integrate various past styles into a new style."

I also mentioned that Gothic was one of these past styles integrated into the Art Deco palette. The Tribune belongs to the Art Deco style but features Gothic details: look at the date.

You can find your own links and look up some books as well. I'm not going to provide links to the many & various books, sites, essays, treatises, etc., on architecture that I studied/read/written about at uni and since during my professional career.

You should do some work to clarify and gain a better understanding instead of expecting me to do it for you. The onus is on you as it is for your benefit.

I've given you quite enough points as starters that you could follow through to increase your knowledge, but, judging from your responses, I suggest you improve your reading skills so you take in the full import of what is written.

Again: Art Deco was the dominant style in Europe in the 1920s, though the first examples of Early Modernism were appearing & are given great emphasis in many texts especially those that barely mention, dismiss or do not mention Art Deco, but it was not Early Modernism that dominated architectural design during that time.

Modernism didn't become dominant until after WWII, ie, after 1945 when it spread to the US taken there by Europeans fleeing or choosing to leave the threat of a Nazi dominated Europe, and it quickly became international, and that post war period is sometimes referred to as International Modernism.

Happy reading.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 07:04 PM   #275
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brizer View Post
Galro: you are just going to have to do some reading but start by reading what I actually wrote above considering terms such as 'eclectic'.

Quote: "Art Deco was eclectic but managed, largely, to integrate various past styles into a new style."

I also mentioned that Gothic was one of these past styles integrated into the Art Deco palette. The Tribune belongs to the Art Deco style but features Gothic details: look at the date.

You can find your own links and look up some books as well. I'm not going to provide links to the many & various books, sites, essays, treatises, etc., on architecture that I studied/read/written about at uni and since during my professional career.

You should do some work to clarify and gain a better understanding instead of expecting me to do it for you. The onus is on you as it is for your benefit.

I've given you quite enough points as starters that you could follow through to increase your knowledge, but, judging from your responses, I suggest you improve your reading skills so you take in the full import of what is written.
So cut the story short: You are saying that I'm wrong, you're right and do not bother do back up your opinion despite I providing sources for my claim.
And you will not provide an answer to what you have extensively read yourself upon?
How very professional.

So basically you are saying that your opinion is by default right and the links I provided are wrong? And yet you to have the cheek to say that "I should lay to side my ego".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brizer View Post
Again: Art Deco was the dominant style in Europe in the 1920s, though the first examples of Early Modernism were appearing & are given great emphasis in many texts especially those that barely mention, dismiss or do not mention Art Deco, but it was not Early Modernism that dominated architectural design during that time.

Modernism didn't become dominant until after WWII, ie, after 1945 when it spread to the US taken there by Europeans fleeing or choosing to leave the threat of a Nazi dominated Europe, and it quickly became international, and that post war period is sometimes referred to as International Modernism.

Happy reading.
Not it wasn't. Early modernism (and some local variants of it) was dominant in Norther Europe. In Scandinavia for example there is hardly a singly Art Deco building while there are hundreds after hundreds of early modernism buildings (called functionalism here). The only European city with somewhat large amounts of Art Deco structures that I'm aware of is London, but it was elsewhere a minor style that didn't have any large impact on the continent.
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Old July 27th, 2012, 11:21 PM   #276
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Galro View Post
So cut the story short: You are saying that I'm wrong, you're right and do not bother do back up your opinion despite I providing sources for my claim.
And you will not provide an answer to what you have extensively read yourself upon?
How very professional.

So basically you are saying that your opinion is by default right and the links I provided are wrong? And yet you to have the cheek to say that "I should lay to side my ego".



Not it wasn't. Early modernism (and some local variants of it) was dominant in Norther Europe. In Scandinavia for example there is hardly a singly Art Deco building while there are hundreds after hundreds of early modernism buildings (called functionalism here). The only European city with somewhat large amounts of Art Deco structures that I'm aware of is London, but it was elsewhere a minor style that didn't have any large impact on the continent.
Wow dude, let it go. He's right.

Atlanta City Hall (referenced in your post #267) is definitely art deco with some neo-gothic/art moderne features...and fits nicely into Brizer's explanation that art deco is an eclectic style made up of past styles. http://www.emporis.com/building/atla...atlanta-ga-usa
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Old July 28th, 2012, 12:43 AM   #277
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Galro: have a good life, mate.
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Old July 30th, 2012, 03:07 AM   #278
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brizer View Post
Paper Ninja: that is a Good One! Suggest you give basic details with pics such as architect and date if known,
That info is in the link to the 2nd pic I posted.
http://decoarchitecture.tumblr.com/p...and-courthouse

Quote:
About the Building

Built in 1932-1934, the building (formerly the McCormack U.S. Post Office and Courthouse) is at Post Office Square and is mostly glad in granite. It was entered in the National Register in 1987. See more photos and info on the Boston Art Deco Society’s web site. View it via Google Street View.

From LoC:

Built in 1931-1933. Architect: Cram & Ferguson. Building consists of three towers rising above a five story base. It is 16 stories tall. The exterior is an excellent example of Art Deco institutional design.
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Old July 30th, 2012, 03:22 AM   #279
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Irving Trust Company (1931), 1 Wall Street, New York, New York


http://www.nyc-architecture.com/LM/L...KOFNEWYORK.htm


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1_Wall_Street


http://www.dreich.info/facade/street/wall%20street/

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/sminor/4679218490/
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Old July 30th, 2012, 04:14 AM   #280
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Dominion Public Building, London Ontario


http://www.metroperspectives.com/p28...A531#h1cb3a531


http://circa1962.blogspot.com/2010/0...n-ontario.html
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