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Old September 7th, 2011, 10:28 AM   #3101
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These seats look quite cozy and safe, maybe take the inspiration from Smart Fortwo
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Old September 7th, 2011, 11:42 AM   #3102
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Traffic

Now that some trains are being checked for defects and the number of daily trains Beijing-Shanghai has been cut to 66, do business class seats sell out?

Are any trains due to complete their check, or any completely new built trains due for delivery?

I hear that around 1st of October, there is a Golden Week holiday. Are large numbers of Chinese planning to travel then? And is CRH planning to expand services ahead of 1st of October?
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Old September 7th, 2011, 12:20 PM   #3103
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Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
That faucet is definitely retro looking. Maybe automatic dispensing ones should be used for both hygiene and water conservation purposes.
First thing to my mind as well!
One forgetful user and no more water for the rest of the day?

The business seats look absolutely comfy.
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Old September 7th, 2011, 12:43 PM   #3104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
That faucet is definitely ... .... Maybe automatic dispensing ones should be used for both hygiene and water conservation purposes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TsLeng View Post
First thing to my mind as well!
One forgetful user and no more water for the rest of the day?

The business seats look absolutely comfy.

Frankly, Product Designers in China are seriously lacking "Thoughtfulness on their Designs"
most of the time, especially true with toilet / washroom designs.

As if they are intentionally treating toilet / washroom designs as some kind of awful lepers.

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Old September 7th, 2011, 02:11 PM   #3105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mika Montwald View Post
Frankly, Product Designers in China are seriously lacking "Thoughtfulness on their Designs"
most of the time, especially true with toilet / washroom designs.

As if they are intentionally treating toilet / washroom designs as some kind of awful lepers.

Sweeping generalisation?

Anyways, is this tap design only in first/exec class? Maybe they trust those there to always close the tap, properly.

But small matter, they can be changed quite easily to automatic taps when they realise there is no more water available with a few hours of journey time before they can refill which will cause some not very happy passengers to make a fuss LOL
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Old September 7th, 2011, 05:31 PM   #3106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mika Montwald View Post
Frankly, Product Designers in China are seriously lacking "Thoughtfulness on their Designs"
most of the time, especially true with toilet / washroom designs.

As if they are intentionally treating toilet / washroom designs as some kind of awful lepers.

Did product design even exist in Chinese universities 10years ago?
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Old September 9th, 2011, 10:56 AM   #3107
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I'm just curios what happened to the plan that CRH will built a train can run up to 500 km/h and the CRH6, this plan are still active or postponed due to accident?
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Old September 9th, 2011, 12:48 PM   #3108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riles28
I'm just curios what happened to the plan that CRH will built a train can run up to 500 km/h and the CRH6, this plan are still active or postponed due to accident?
Well, all CRH trains have been slowed down after the previous minister of railways got fired (this was already planned before the Wenzhou crash). The current minister further reduced speeds after the crash due to safety concerns.

I think a 500 km/h CRH is further away than it ever has been.
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Old September 9th, 2011, 01:51 PM   #3109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riles28 View Post
I'm just curios what happened to the plan that CRH will built a train can run up to 500 km/h and the CRH6, this plan are still active or postponed due to accident?
as far as we know, the CRH6 is still on schedule.
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Old September 10th, 2011, 08:00 PM   #3110
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Old September 11th, 2011, 10:17 AM   #3111
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amazing your handycam is very good job..!!
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Old September 11th, 2011, 01:25 PM   #3112
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amazing your handycam is very good job..!!
Not mine.
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Old September 12th, 2011, 05:34 PM   #3113
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexNL View Post
Well, all CRH trains have been slowed down after the previous minister of railways got fired (this was already planned before the Wenzhou crash). The current minister further reduced speeds after the crash due to safety concerns.

I think a 500 km/h CRH is further away than it ever has been.
what was the max speed and average speed before accident for G1 series trains i.e which was having stop only at Nanjing south?

G1-G10(I guess few no. are reserved for future) - trains between Beijing-Shanghai and vice versa with stop only at Nanjing.

G11-G30(few no. may be reserved for future) - with two stops.. Nanjing and Jinan

G31-G40(few no. may be reserbed for future) - runs between Beijing and Hangzhou/vice versa with 7-8 stops.

Is this the way new G serious are numbered?

I travelled in G38 today from Nanjing to Xuzhou

Max speed - 315KMPH
Average speed - 262KMPH
Stop - Non stop, Distance - 333KM

Looks there are some speed restriction,

* the train crossed Yangtze rive bridge with 250KMPH, then only speed was increased to 305KMPH and then to 315KMPH.

* Speed dropped to 290KMPH when train crossed Chuzhou and again accelerated back to 305-310KMPH

* Again speed dropped to 180KMPH for few minutes when it was running nearing Bengbu (I guess there would be branch to Hefei from here). I wonder whether it is due to alignment or due to signaling.
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Old September 12th, 2011, 07:49 PM   #3114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arul Murugan View Post
what was the max speed and average speed before accident for G1 series trains i.e which was having stop only at Nanjing south?

G1-G10(I guess few no. are reserved for future) - trains between Beijing-Shanghai and vice versa with stop only at Nanjing.

G11-G30(few no. may be reserved for future) - with two stops.. Nanjing and Jinan

G31-G40(few no. may be reserbed for future) - runs between Beijing and Hangzhou/vice versa with 7-8 stops.

Is this the way new G serious are numbered?

I travelled in G38 today from Nanjing to Xuzhou

Max speed - 315KMPH
Average speed - 262KMPH
Stop - Non stop, Distance - 333KM

Looks there are some speed restriction,

* the train crossed Yangtze rive bridge with 250KMPH, then only speed was increased to 305KMPH and then to 315KMPH.

* Speed dropped to 290KMPH when train crossed Chuzhou and again accelerated back to 305-310KMPH

* Again speed dropped to 180KMPH for few minutes when it was running nearing Bengbu (I guess there would be branch to Hefei from here). I wonder whether it is due to alignment or due to signaling.
290 km/h is mostly likely caused by passing through electricity split phase.

There's no permanent speed limit near Bengbu. You might be not lucky on that day.
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Old September 13th, 2011, 08:28 PM   #3115
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Crossing the Dashengguan bridge at 250km/h must be awesome, and that bridge is even rated for 300km/h passings.
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Old September 13th, 2011, 11:28 PM   #3116
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Chinese Vice Premier calls for thorough rail safety checks
2011-08-16 15:57:39 GMT2011-08-16 23:57:39(Beijing Time) Xinhua English

BEIJING, Aug. 16 (Xinhua) -- Vice Premier Zhang Dejiang on Tuesday urged a thorough overhaul of China's high-speed railways to prevent major accidents.
The checks, to run from mid-August to mid-September, aim to "thoroughly eliminate risks" concerning high-speed railways and "effectively prevent and resolutely curb" major railway accidents to ensure the safety of rail traffic, Zhang said at a mobilization meeting for the checks.
The safety of the country's high-speed railways was questioned after high-speed trains on a line near the eastern city of Wenzhou collided on July 23, leaving 40 people dead and 191 injured.
"The accident cautioned us that safety is the priority for railway development...Starting safety checks is a pressing need to raise the government's credibility and also a key measure to ensure the safety of railway transport," Zhang said.
The safety checks cover high-speed railways that are both in operation and under construction, according to a State Council statement released last week.
The State Administration of Work Safety will lead the inspection on equipment quality, operation safety, and design and quality of railways under construction.
The government will reevaluate the system safety on rail projects that have received government approval but have not commenced construction. It ordered a temporary halt of approval of new railway lines until the safety review can be completed, according to the statement.
The checks will be carried out by 12 teams composed of government officials and 175 technical experts. Officials of Ministry of Railways are not on the list.
The teams should make thorough checks of high-speed railways and not go through the motions, Zhang said.
He encouraged officials and experts to "go deep down to the grass-roots levels" for first-hand information and provide suggestions on how to improve rail safety.
Operations and constructions must be stopped instantly if any potential safety hazards are spotted, Zhang said.
The safety checks are the latest move by the government to regain the public's trust in the country's fast-growing high-speed rail sector.
Effective on Tuesday, bullet trains with a designed maximum speed of 350 km per hour start running at 300 km, those with designed maximum speeds of 250 km per hour run at 200 km per hour, and those with maximum speed 200 km per hour run at 160 km per hour.
Ticket prices have been trimmed accordingly.
"Cutting running speeds of bullet trains during the initial stages is necessary for the ministry to gather experience in the management of railway safety," railway minister Sheng Guangzu said.
It is 13th of September.

On which day in the middle of this month shall the safety review be completed?
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Old September 15th, 2011, 06:05 AM   #3117
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Derailed Hopes

The devastating Wenzhou train crash has a mixed impact on the Chinese economy and industries associated with high-speed trains

By HU YUE
bjreview.com.cn
UPDATED: August 15, 2011

image hosted on flickr

Workers accelerate electrification of the Beijing-Kowloon Railway.

While China mourns the lives lost in the high-speed rail crash on July 23 near Wenzhou, the accident's far-reaching implications for the economy are being increasingly felt. One casualty of the disaster is likely to be the country's ambitious plan to press ahead with a building spree of high-speed railways—the crash may lead to a delay or scaling-down of these projects.

The Chinese Government has poured exorbitant sums into developing the world's largest high-speed rail system, which had reached 8,358 km of tracks by the end of last year. It is expected to exceed 13,000 km by 2012 and 16,000 km by 2020. The train collision was the first serious accident involving China's bullet trains, which began running in 2007. China aimed for a small decline in railway infrastructure investment this year, setting the annual spending target at 745.5 billion yuan ($115.6 billion). But now many analysts believe China could miss that target, as it will have to slow down the pace of construction and focus on rail safety. "Since 2008 China has experienced a significant leap forward in railway building," said Song Bin, a senior analyst with the Beijing-based Tianxiang Investment Consulting Ltd. "The speed of construction is set to slow down."

Whatever the cause of the crash, China will attach greater importance to making its bullet trains safer, said the Ping An Securities Co. Ltd. in a recent report. "The government is bound to tighten its efforts to address problems in train dispatching and signaling systems and railway management," the report said. Jiang Langting, an analyst with the Gao Hua Securities Co. Ltd., said the accident, along with other recent malfunctions in high-speed rails, can help push forward a new round of reforms within the Ministry of Railways (MOR). "It is now imperative for the ministry to heighten its management efficiency and profitability," Jiang said.

Zhao Jian, a professor at the School of Economics and Management of the Beijing Jiaotong University, said this accident is the outcome of exponential development in high-speed railways. "The MOR should rethink the development model of high-speed railways and balance speed and quality, as well as benefits and safety," he said. Even before the crash, high-speed rails were the target of criticism due to possible environmental damage and ticket prices that are too high for ordinary Chinese consumers. "After so many years of rapid expansion, China's high-speed railway investment needs to take a breath," said Zhen Yi, an analyst with the GF Securities Co. Ltd. in Shenzhen. "However, it's very unlikely for the country to give up those lines already under construction, which involve trillions of yuan in total investment," she added.

As the Chinese economy moves out of the shadow of the financial crisis, robust investment deserves much of the credit. But economists believe the recent railway tragedy will promote policymakers to put the breaks on aggressive investment expansion, marking a turning point in the country's growth model. "Authorities may choose intentionally to slow economic growth gradually but firmly to 7-8 percent in following years and spend more time fixing the problems caused by fast growth," said Minggao Shen, chief economist for Greater China, Citigroup Inc.

image hosted on flickr

Pictured is a bullet train assembly line of the CSR Corp. Ltd. The Wenzhou
train crash is expected to have a negative impact on the company's equipment
and technology exports (LI ZIHENG)

Financial strains
Meanwhile, worries have been abounding about the debt sustainability of the MOR since the accident may hinder its ability to finance future projects. In a move to fund massive high-speed railway projects, the MOR has taken on a mountain of debts. By the end of June 2011, debts of China's railway operators, all affiliated to the MOR, had totaled 2.0907 trillion yuan ($324.1 billion), with an asset-liability ratio of 58.53 percent, slightly up from 58.24 percent in the first quarter of this year, according to data from the Shanghai Clearing House, an inter-bank clearing house under the People's Bank of China, the central bank. The Ministry of Finance and the MOR are the only government departments that can issue direct financing such as short-term financing bills, corporate bonds and medium-term notes.

On July 21, the finance ministry planned to auction short-term financing bills of 20 billion yuan ($3.1 billion) with a yield of 5.18 percent, but only raised 18.7 billion yuan ($2.9 billion). Concerns are rising that the MOR's securities may further lose their appeal to investors due to the deadly accident. Now, after the recent accident, demand for railway ministry bonds has dropped even lower, said Stephen Green, a Hong Kong-based economist with the Standard Chartered Bank. "It will be a long time before the MOR returns to the bond market," he added, citing doubts if the ministry's operations can generate enough free cash flow to cover the interest payments on its debts. "If the ministry is a company, then it already faces the risk of going bankrupt," said Zheng Ruxi, an analyst with the Huatai Securities Co. Ltd. "But it is a government agency, and its bonds are guaranteed by government credit, which provided a cushion against the impact of the train crash."

Zhao Qingming, a senior researcher with China Construction Bank, said the MOR, with solid and stable returns, remains an appreciated customer for commercial banks, and the tragic train collision will not change its credit rating. His view was shared by Guo Tianyong, Director of the Research Center of China's Banking Industry under the Central University of Finance and Economics, who said the accident will fuel the MOR's risks but won't alter the big picture.

Chain reaction
As China is likely to curtail railway investments, a number of relevant industries may receive a heavy blow, such as those that supply cement, steel and coal. The China Galaxy Securities Co. Ltd. estimated that 700 billion yuan ($108.5 billion) of railway investments could create demands for 30 million tons of steel and 140 million tons of cement. Bearing the brunt are also a string of railway equipment manufacturers, including China Railway Signal & Communication Corp. (CRCS), one of the contracted builders of the signal system of the Ningbo-Taizhou-Wenzhou Railway, where the crash occurred. As the state-owned company gears up to debut on the stock market next year, many fret that the accident has cast an ominous shadow over the prospect of its initial public offerings.

In addition, Chinese manufacturers of bullet trains—CSR and CNR—are also expected to suffer painful losses. The two companies are competing for export orders of high-speed trains, technologies and equipment, as well as contracts to make bullet trains overseas. CSR, for example, in December 2010 signed an agreement with the U.S. conglomerate General Electric to make high-speed trains in the United States. Just because of the latest accident, they are experiencing a frustration on the path of expanding offshore.

"The disaster exposed key flaws in China's railway system and it could take 20 years for local train and rail builders to convince foreign buyers their high-speed technology is safe," said Edwin Merner, President of Atlantis Investment Research Corp. "The accident does not mean the end of high-speed trains, but it will force other countries to think more about whether they really need it and where they get those technologies," said Ingrid Wei, an analyst at Credit Suisse.

Li Xuerong, a senior researcher with the Shenzhen-based think-tank CIConsulting, downplayed the worries, saying "despite the stumbling blocks, Chinese companies will adhere to the significant strategy of going global and lay a solid global foothold." Meanwhile, the ripple effect of the accident is spreading throughout the economy. "The train crash may damp demand for property in cities along new railway lines," said Credit Suisse, in a report. "Chinese policymakers vowed investigations into the illegal confiscation of land by local governments in the name of railway and highway development. And the recent accident could trigger a movement that may affect developers' existing land banks," said the report.

The only beneficiary may be airlines, which faced intense competition from high-speed railways. After the Zhengzhou-Shanghai Express Railway came into operation in February 2010, Henan Airlines saw passenger numbers shrink by half and eventually shut down the route in January 2011.But since the train accident on July 23, the balance of power has been obviously tipping in favor of airlines. As many travelers consider flying a safer option, air ticket prices across the nation have staged a powerful rebound. "We believe airlines in the short term may regain market shares lost to high-speed railways, as travelers' confidence in China's high-speed railways could take time to rebuild," said Goldman Sachs in a report. "Over the longer term, however, we expect safety issues to be resolved and, in our view, high-speed railways will still be a competitive and energy-efficient mode of transportation in China," it concluded.
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Old September 15th, 2011, 06:13 AM   #3118
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Old September 18th, 2011, 11:40 PM   #3119
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China's High-Speed Rail System: Boom or Bust?

Over the past decade, China has become nearly synonymous with economic growth. The country has continually posted double digit GDP growth and the IMF predicts that China may become the largest economy by 2016. These predictions have some US economic analysts pondering: "should we be concerned about China?"

We can evaluate factors affecting the answer to this question by using Recorded Future to analyze open source information about the Chinese economy, specifically infrastructure projects. By examining China's highly touted innovation and leadership in high-speed rail, we find that recent safety issues, government censorship, and public doubts over safety expose a likely slowdown in progress for the country's infrastructure.

China's Ambitious Rail Plans

There is no doubt that the high-speed railway market in China has been red hot in recent years, and one source indicates that China's high speed railroad track mileage may exceed 16,000 kilometers by 2020. The government is also spending billions to expand into less-populated areas, "as the first long-distance high-speed rail line in west China, the second line of Lanxin Railway has a planned investment of more than 140 billion yuan ($21.91 billion)."

What else can we learn about the future of the Chinese high speed railroad network?

[IMG]http://www.analysisintelligence.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/screen12.jpg[/IMG]
But not all is well with the development of the Chinese high-speed rail system, and a deadly crash this past July exposed serious safety and regulatory shortcomings.

Public Criticism and Falling Investment

The subsequent attempt by the Chinese government to censor information about the disaster evoked tremendous public backlash that now threaten to significantly slow proposed projects. Bloomberg also reported that many projects were temporarily halted following the accident, which is likely to have an impact on the completion date, if not the long term development, of China's expanding rail system.

What kind of impact did the train crash have on the rail industry in China?

[IMG]http://www.analysisintelligence.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/screen3.jpg[/IMG]

Above, we filtered results about China's railway system to only those articles published after the crash on July 23rd. What do we find? We quickly see that China's high-speed rail system is in big trouble.

Railway industry analyst Lu Zhou seems to have summed it up best: "A Great Leap Forward-style movement in China's high-speed railway is changing abruptly to a period of silence, and that could last a few years". Investment in high speed rail has already taken a substantial hit, with seven out of 28 railway firms in China reporting losses.

Two key points from the Xinhua News Agency that are particularly troubling:

According to statistics from the Ministry of Railways (MOR), growth in the country's railway fixed-asset investment has been on the decline, from a 25.6-percent year-on-year increase in January to a 21.8-percent year-on-year decline in July.



China Railway Erju Co. Ltd., a leading railway construction enterprise, reported net profits of 395.57 million yuan (61.91 million U.S. dollars) in the first half of the year, a 12.24 percent drop year-on-year.


The train crash in Wenzhou had a significant impact on the high-speed rail industry in China. For the first time since the 1990s, train speed is expected to slow down. Some train makers have halted production, and the $5 billion expected IPO of Beijing-Shanghai High-Speed Railway was suspended after the crash. One Chinese official indicated that, "upcoming safety checks on the country's high-speed railway network are necessary to raise the government's credibility". These indicators suggest that a serious problem exists within the Chinese high-speed rail system.

Understanding Public Sentiment in China

Another angle to consider when using Recorded Future is the data mined from Chinese language sources. In the graph below, we conducted a search similar to the one above but using only Chinese language texts. One article on China Dialogue discusses the end of the invincibility myth of the Chinese high-speed rail system. An editorial in the Financial Times then defends the railroad system and urges for its continued development.

[IMG]http://www.analysisintelligence.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/screen4.jpg[/IMG]

We also performed a search for any future facing railway information in Chinese. One of the most useful articles was a translated version of another Financial Times article that discussed the recent accident. The article discusses potential problems that the government may now face in rail, "5 years ago, the Chinese government invested heavily in the hope that [it would] in record time...[become] the world's largest high-speed rail network. Intention is to stimulate the construction of high-speed rail and improve the efficiency of national pride, but [the railway] has now become...embarrassing".

[IMG]http://www.analysisintelligence.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/screen2.jpg[/IMG]

Potentially even more interesting is the wealth of social media data can be found at the bottom of the article in 116 comments. These comments were made by Chinese speakers, most of whom are located within China, and some are particularly candid: "I am struggling to find confidence in the government, but it is really difficult. Too much logic lies."

Conclusion:

Debates like these are fairly rare in China where citizens are often discouraged from criticizing the government. The railroad system is a crown jewel for the Chinese government, and it is clearly not too pleased with the criticism. However, the government faced tremendous public backlash that forced it to reduce the level of censorship.

The very nature of this debate can be seen within the above mentioned comments as nationalists and government skeptics battled it out online. Thousands of people viewed these comments and over a hundred commented, showing that this became a highly salient issue in China. The end result, based on media analysis, public sentiment, and financial data suggests that Chinese high-speed rail development is in serious trouble and may be slowed for years.
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Old September 19th, 2011, 05:29 AM   #3120
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This might be the most mediocre analysis ever...
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