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Old October 23rd, 2011, 11:12 AM   #3181
ddes
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Got off the Beijing-Tianjin HSR a few hours ago.

A little disappointed that the train never exceeded 268km/h.
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 11:14 AM   #3182
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indeed
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 11:46 AM   #3183
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Since I guess you took the trip in part for the speed, I can understand the annoyance. But if your goal is to get to Tianjin quickly the speed reductions shouldn't matter.

I noticed my phone had problems switching base stations as soon as the train got up to speed. I don't know if that is a common experience.
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 04:36 PM   #3184
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Those problems arose in Europe as well, I believe they have been resolved by enhancing the capacity of the cellular networks by adding extra masts.
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 08:06 PM   #3185
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Dear Passengers blog
http://www.dearpassengers.com/2011/1...n-in-shenzhen/

Quote:
Breaking News: Two Killed, Two Injured by CRH Train in Shenzhen
Posted on 23 October 2011 by David Feng

Coming out from Sina Weibo: This just in — four unauthorized pedestrians who made their way onto a railway bridge suffered a collision with a CRH train on the Guangzhou-Shenzhen Railway. The exact location is around the Pinghu stretch in Shenzhen, Guangdong. One of the pedestrians, a 19-year-old from western China’s Gansu province, was hit so badly that he was literally torn into two by the force of the oncoming train.

This railway has been upgraded some time back to permit speeds of up to 200 km/h. Half of the railway is now frequently served by CRH accelerated trains (the other half is reserved for long-distance rail traffic and traffic to and from Hong Kong).

Riders are reminded to exercise extra caution if travelling by CRH trains on this railway for at least the next few weeks. In the meantime, the Weibo community also mentions that crashes are (unfortunately) not rare on this route. This article will be updated as needed.
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Old October 23rd, 2011, 09:04 PM   #3186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddes View Post
Got off the Beijing-Tianjin HSR a few hours ago.

A little disappointed that the train never exceeded 268km/h.
Really? It went up to 334 km/h when i took it in July.

It did the trip in 30 minutes. How much is it with the lowered speed?
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Old October 24th, 2011, 06:42 PM   #3187
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woonsocket54 View Post
That's sad news, I don't think those upgraded traditional railway lines are as strictly access controlled as the dedicated HSR line. They are not completely separate right of way, so people can sneak onto it from railway crossings.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 06:44 PM   #3188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexNL View Post
Those problems arose in Europe as well, I believe they have been resolved by enhancing the capacity of the cellular networks by adding extra masts.
Exactly, I experienced the same when I was riding CRH between Shanghai and Nanjing, as well as TGV from Paris to Marseilles.
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Old October 24th, 2011, 07:44 PM   #3189
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The Guangzhou-Shenzhen stretch of Guangzhou-Kowloon railway seems to have been among the first railways upgraded to 200 km/h, as early as 1998 or so.

Has it also been slowed down to 160 km/h in the second slowdown campaign?
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Old October 25th, 2011, 04:24 AM   #3190
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Dear Passengers blog
http://www.dearpassengers.com/2011/1...-in-july-2012/

Quote:
Harbin-Dalian HSR Ready to Rock in July 2012
Posted on 24 October 2011 by David Feng

And it rocks exactly a year after the Beijing-Shanghai HSR took off.

The Harbin-Dalian (Hada) HSR (哈大高速铁路) will be ready to ferry riders from Heilongjiang’s capital, Harbin, down to Dalian in Liaoning, in under 4 hours’ time as of July 2012. (The original line was scheduled for a 1 October 2011; however, Sheng Guangzu, the present person in charge of the Chinese mainland authorities responsible for railway transport, delayed this and nearly all projects.) Trial runs (not carrying passengers) are tentatively scheduled for early March 2012.

If trains running on this line are also “extended” to Beijing, travel time will fall from over 9 hours to less than 6 hours, based on a rough calculation and with the present temporary speed limits considered. That’s about 2 hours faster than the original Beijing-Harbin Railway before the temporary speed limits were introduced.

Final station for this line up in northeastern China is the Harbin West Railway Station, which will host Harbin Metro Line 3 upon its completion in late 2012. This new station easily knocks the existing two stations, Harbin and Harbin East, off the map in terms of size, traffic and glitziness.

This line will service northeastern China’s Heilongjiang, Jilin and Liaoning provinces, and call at four major train hubs: Harbin (West), Changchun, Shenyang and Dalian. In the city of Changchun, riders can also change to express intercity trains headed to the city of Jilin (inside the province of Jilin — confused?…).

We are predicting that the CRH380 trains will service this new line as the present-day CRH5 trains are too slow (this line is designed for speeds up to 350 km/h, but CRH5 trains “max out” at a “mere” 350 km/h).

The other difficulty is the weather in this part of China. Winters here can be hellishly cold, so no “real” work can get underway during the final months of the year. The opening next year ends a 5-year HSR marathon for northeastern China.

Travel time from Beijing to Harbin will further fall to around 5 hours (based even on the temporary speed limits) if future trains leave Beijing via Beijing South via Tianjin to Tangshan, Qinhuangdao, Shenyang and Changchun before reaching Harbin. Ultimate relief comes in the form of a totally-new Beijing-Shenyang HSR, which, when it opens by late 2015 (according to the 12th Five-Year Plan), will slash travel time to 4 hours if trains run at the maximum speed limit — 350 km/h — throughout.
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Old October 25th, 2011, 08:47 AM   #3191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Feng
The Harbin-Dalian (Hada) HSR (哈大高速铁路) will be ready to ferry riders from Heilongjiang’s capital, Harbin, down to Dalian in Liaoning, in under 4 hours’ time as of July 2012. (The original line was scheduled for a 1 October 2011; however, Sheng Guangzu, the present person in charge of the Chinese mainland authorities responsible for railway transport, delayed this and nearly all projects.)
Has Harbin-Dalian HSR passed a safety review to confirm the new opening date?

Delayed this and nearly all projects. Nearly all. Not quite all. What are the exceptions? Apart from the Beijing-Shanghai HSR, opened already, which railway lines are still on original schedule?
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Old October 25th, 2011, 08:42 PM   #3192
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Quote:
We are predicting that the CRH380 trains will service this new line as the present-day CRH5 trains are too slow (this line is designed for speeds up to 350 km/h, but CRH5 trains “max out” at a “mere” 350 km/h).
I think they meant to say the CRH5 trains max out at 250 km/h.
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Old October 25th, 2011, 09:44 PM   #3193
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CRH5 is derived from the New Pendolino which has a max. speed of 250 km/h, indeed. If you want higher speeds, I am pretty sure Alstom is willing to sell some AGVs
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Old October 26th, 2011, 04:02 PM   #3194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
Really? It went up to 334 km/h when i took it in July.

It did the trip in 30 minutes. How much is it with the lowered speed?
It took me about 45 to 55 minutes.

Or maybe it could be the intense fog (visibility of 100 metres) that was slowing my Beijing South-Tianjin train? Then again, the skies cleared up 3 hours later that same day, and it was barely hitting 300km/h. The highest I got was 294km/h on the return.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 06:08 PM   #3195
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MoR investigating after a chef and former restaurant owner with no engineering experience was offered a CNY2.311 billion contract to build a rail bridge, he employed migrant workers with no bridge building experience either and they used gravel instead of concrete for the bridges foundations meaning the structure will probably have to be pulled down and replaced. Story first reported by Xinhua.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:32 PM   #3196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WatcherZero View Post
MoR investigating after a chef and former restaurant owner with no engineering experience was offered a CNY2.311 billion contract to build a rail bridge, he employed migrant workers with no bridge building experience either and they used gravel instead of concrete for the bridges foundations meaning the structure will probably have to be pulled down and replaced. Story first reported by Xinhua.
This has nothing to do with the HSR, it's a local conventional railway project. Also your information is incorrect as the whole railway line cost CNY2.3 billion, and with several layers of illegal subcontracting many people with no engineering experience got some work awarded to them, including said bridge. The chef was only awarded a tiny portion of the work.

I suggest a mod to move this discussion to the China Railway thread.
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Old October 26th, 2011, 07:34 PM   #3197
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ddes View Post
It took me about 45 to 55 minutes.

Or maybe it could be the intense fog (visibility of 100 metres) that was slowing my Beijing South-Tianjin train? Then again, the skies cleared up 3 hours later that same day, and it was barely hitting 300km/h. The highest I got was 294km/h on the return.
Since the July accident and several rounds of slow downs that line now has a 300km/h speed limit so it's no surprise it took you longer to get there.
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Old October 28th, 2011, 07:22 AM   #3198
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News from around the world re. China HSR

Financial Times (London) (may require subscription to view):

Quote:
With the same force that powered the most ambitious rail programme in history, China has slammed the brakes on its investment in high-speed trains.

The sudden halt has led to system-wide whiplash, leaving workers without pay, battalions of heavy machinery sitting idle and setting back plans for bullet trains that were meant to carry the nation’s future.

In the farm fields of Bazhou, unfinished pillars and silent cement mixers stand along a gravel path that was designed to be a key link in the high-speed network, connecting Tianjin with Baoding in the north-east. It is now one of the dozens of large rail projects suspended after a crash in July left 40 people dead near the eastern city of Wenzhou. The crash revealed how China had cut corners in its haste to build the world’s biggest bullet train system.
http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/a9337...#axzz1c2v0Xgz3

the Economic Times of India:
Quote:
BEIJING: Recurring accidents and dwindling credit has thrown China's ambitious high-speed railway projects out of gear as most of them have been put on hold while the government mulls plans to build high-speed freight lines to get better returns.

The state run Global Times reported today that work on the 2,066-km long Shanghai to Kunming high-speed railway came to an abrupt end in Jiangxi Province.
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/.../10508865.cms]

and straight from the horse's mouth, so to speak:
Quote:
High-speed off rails, freight on
By Hao Di (Global Times)
China's railway authorities are discussing plans to build a large freight line, as a number of high-speed rail projects have been put on hold due to a funding shortage.

Some say the move demonstrates a shift from focusing on high-speed passenger construction to freight, the China Business Times reported.

With a total investment of 159.8 billion yuan ($25.09 billion), a freight line for coal transportation linking the north and the south has been listed in the five-year railway construction plan.
http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90882/7627862.html
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Old October 28th, 2011, 02:42 PM   #3199
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It's not really necessary to post here rubbish from garbage, like FT or WSJ
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Old October 28th, 2011, 03:25 PM   #3200
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CRH380AL overtook CRH3

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMzExNjI3ODA0.html
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