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Old May 21st, 2012, 05:22 PM   #3981
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That's not entirely unexpected, the decision to slow down is IMO entirely political, and long haul routes such as Beijing-Shanghai or Wuhan-Shenzhen can benefit greatly from going back to 350km/h. If Beijing-Shanghai is restored to 380km/h then the quickest train will be able to finish the trip in four hours, making it sounds a lot more attractive in advertisements.
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Old May 21st, 2012, 06:24 PM   #3982
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
CRH photography

Beijing-Shanghai HSR

This isn't Beijing-Shanghai HSR. Picture shows a part of track just outside of Beijing Central railway station, quite a distance away from Beijing South from which Beijing-Shanghai HSR begins.

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by 铁路小亨
And this one is in the same spot - said station s right behind that ming times Fort. Also the CRH2 on the track looks very much like the the trains that were used on Beijing-Tianjin line before opening of a new proper 350km/h line in 2008
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Old May 22nd, 2012, 12:21 AM   #3983
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And this one is in the same spot - said station s right behind that ming times Fort. Also the CRH2 on the track looks very much like the the trains that were used on Beijing-Tianjin line before opening of a new proper 350km/h line in 2008
Exactly, the absence of large aerodynamic fairing around the pantographs indicates it's not a 300km/h rated CRH2C.
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Old May 22nd, 2012, 12:23 AM   #3984
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
That's not entirely unexpected, the decision to slow down is IMO entirely political, and long haul routes such as Beijing-Shanghai or Wuhan-Shenzhen can benefit greatly from going back to 350km/h. If Beijing-Shanghai is restored to 380km/h then the quickest train will be able to finish the trip in four hours, making it sounds a lot more attractive in advertisements.
When I took the train a few days after opening, it did it in 4:45. I can tell you those last 45 minutes did seem a little too long. 4 hours would be perfect, and I would never take a plane for that trip again.
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Old May 22nd, 2012, 12:35 AM   #3985
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyridgeline View Post
Published on Apr 19, 2012 by tianyadaniel
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Old May 22nd, 2012, 08:31 AM   #3986
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Fair treatment for private capital in railway investment
(Shanghai Daily, May 22)


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BEIJING, May 21 (Xinhua) -- China's recent move to give private capital equal treatment in investing in the country's railway projects is expected to inject new vitality into the long-monopolized railway sector amid concerns of an economic slowdown.

According to a guideline issued by the Ministry of Railways (MOR) on Friday, equal market entry access will be created for all investors and private capital will be exempt from additional requirements. The implementation of favorable policies will be transparent.

The guideline stated that private investors are allowed to participate in almost every category of railway projects, including the construction of backbone lines, passenger lines, inter-city lines and regional lines.

Eligible investors will also be allowed to participate in the design, construction, supervision, consultation, equipment purchasing and bidding processes.

The guideline, which is by far the most open and detailed regulation in terms of the railway industry's market entrance to date, is expected to diversify investment channels to help ease the sector's debt that has brought some construction projects to a halt.

After years of torrid growth, construction and investment in China's railways cooled remarkably, as the government tightened credit to cap inflation and a train crash last July that killed 40 people exposed the sector's weaknesses.

In contrast to a target investment of 500 billion yuan (79.37 billion U.S. dollars) this year, investment dropped 48.3 percent from a year earlier to 89.6 billion yuan in the first four months, official data show.

Meanwhile, the sector recorded 7 billion yuan in losses in the first quarter, with the current asset-liability ratio staying around 60 percent.

Yang Zhongmin, head of the ministry's department of development and planning, said the government, as the major investor, approved more than 4 trillion yuan in railway investment from 2003 to 2010.

According to the guideline, the MOR should separate its government functions from enterprise management and reform its administration mechanism to let enterprises be the principal market player.

The guideline also underlined the need to reform the investment and fundraising systems for railway projects. Railway-related companies are encouraged to go public, and insurance funds are welcome to invest more in railways.

It also encouraged financial innovations in creating more kinds of fundraising platforms to provide private investors with better access to capital.

Private investors are also welcome to make innovations in advanced and environmentally-friendly technologies and facilities, it said.

The government has repeatedly vowed to break the state monopoly and encourage private investors to participate in domains such as the railway and financial sectors -- a move aiming to push market-oriented reforms and tap inner growth potential.

With signs of a worse-than-expected slowdown in China indicated by weak economic data for April, CITIC Securities said more policies may be introduced to maintain reasonable growth in infrastructure investment.

Huang Junjie, an analyst with China Investment Securities, expected railway investment to return to a normal level in the coming months.

During an inspection tour last week, Premier Wen Jiabao said the government will focus its energy on expanding domestic demand to increase the stability of the economy, reiterating support for private capital in investing in the railway and several other sectors.

http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article...a.asp?id=72174
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Old May 23rd, 2012, 05:50 AM   #3987
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Closer Look: Unanswered Questions for Private Investment in Railways

Thank you everywhere for your post. Business magazine Caixin has a bit different view on the above news.

Quote:
By staff reporter Gu Yongqiang 05.22.2012 19:00
Closer Look: Unanswered Questions for Private Investment in Railways
Ministry says the sector is opening up, but recently released guidelines are short on details



(Beijing) – On May 18, the Ministry of Railways announced guidelines to encourage private capital to invest in the sector. The guidelines said a variety of investment entities would be treated fairly as they entered the sector, but didn't set out any limits on amounts of private capital.

The guidelines say private capital will be allowed to invest in new railway lines and bid for equipment procurement, construction and engineering design contracts.

The ministry also said that it will reduce the steps involved for approving new projects. If a new project can be handled by the market, the government can play a management or supervisory role.

The ministry issued this guideline as its debts increase and at the request of the State Council. It intends to use private capital to relieve financial strains in the building of new railway infrastructure, but investors say the guidelines are ambiguous and do not dispel several concerns.

The first involves train dispatching. Similar to the aviation industry, railway passenger flow has a direct impact on revenue. But the ministry is the only body that compiles train timetables and is responsible for dispatching trains.

For joint-venture railways, the rate of traffic flow and the division of traffic are incorporated into the daily transportation schedule of local railway bureaus under the ministry. They have to submit to the ministry. This means there is no guarantee that the joint-venture railway operators can profit. If investors don't anticipate profitability, none will be interested.

The second concern involves prices and the public. The government tightly controls transportation prices. The National Development and Reform Commission must approve rate increases for passengers or freight. Investors naturally wonder where their profits will come from if their costs increase but they are not allowed to charge more.

Also, transport on domestic railways is linked to the public welfare. However, the ministry did not say how railways might be compensated if they are forced to keep ticket prices down.

The third and final problem involves geography. The ministry uses profits made by railway bureaus in eastern regions to make up for losses in other areas. If private capital enters the railway sector, how to make revenue distribution fair and transparent and how to ensure investors make a profit are open questions.

http://english.caixin.com/2012-05-22/100392855_all.html
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Old May 23rd, 2012, 07:33 AM   #3988
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdolniak View Post
Thank you everywhere for your post. Business magazine Caixin has a bit different view on the above news.
The Shanghai Daily article reads like tendering conditions while the Caixin article focus on cash flow and service exploitation.
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Old May 23rd, 2012, 09:55 AM   #3989
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Foggy Business on China's Fast-Train Tracks

Another follow-up on everywhere's post no. 3951 about concerns on German high-speed equipment. Since the original news wasn't clear, this Caixin article gives a bit more information.

Note: quoted first few paragraphs of the article. The whole text is long and anyone wishing to read the rest, please follow the link at the end of the page.

Quote:
By staff reporter Wang Chen 05.23.2012 11:45
Foggy Business on China's Fast-Train Tracks
A German maker of railway building materials is caught in a debate over bullet train contracting and safety



(Beijing)– Workers building a high-speed railway that will eventually link Shanghai and Kunming are familiar with a powdery substance often found clinging to steel construction materials called cast-in channels.

What they've observed is worrisome because cast-in channels give critical support to all sorts of railroad structures, from power line to tunnel ceilings.
And the powder suggests at least some of the channels – squarish, grooved rods usually made of galvanized steel – may be defective.

The nation's expanding network of fast trains relies heavily on cast-in channels. They're supposed to bear weight and significant pressure. And they're everywhere: So many channels are being installed in the 333 kilometers of tunnels on the Shanghai-Kunming line that they'd stretch 133 kilometers if laid end-to-end.

Experts say a defective channel can, in a worst-case scenario, cause structural failure and perhaps trigger a rail disaster.

It's doubtful the nation's 1.8 trillion yuan bullet-train expansion project – led by state-run China Railway Construction Corp. (CRCC) and the Ministry of Railways – can afford another tragedy like the collision between two passenger trains last year that killed 40 people. The crash bloodied the image of China's railways and prompted a slowdown of fast-train construction projects.

The powder, according to a railway construction expert who spoke with Caixin on the condition of anonymity, is zinc residue from a coating applied to cast-in channels made of galvanized steel.

Zinc applications help prevent rust. A channel that loses its protective zinc coating can corrode, gradually weaken and break.

So far, none of the railroad project's contractors nor the railway ministry have addressed what the construction expert said is a potential safety hazard.
Caixin sought but failed to get comments on the issue from officials with rail construction companies and CRCC's Third Railway Survey and Design Institute, which in the course of drafting railway line blueprints chose a specific brand of cast-in channel for most applications.

[...]

http://english.caixin.com/2012-05-23/100393024_all.html
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Old May 23rd, 2012, 10:51 AM   #3990
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High-speed rail link first leg in north-south artery

High-speed rail link first leg in north-south artery
Global Times | May 23, 2012 00:50
By Deng Jingyin

The Beijing-Shijiazhuang high-speed railway, which will cut travel time between the two cities by more than half, is to start four months of trail runs beginning in July, bringing high-speed rail service between Beijing and Hong Kong a step closer.

After almost four years of construction, the 281-kilometer-long Beijing-Shijiazhuang line is expected to be put into service by the end of this year. Trains are expected to travel at 350 kilometers per hour, slashing the travel time between Beijing and Shijiazhuang from two hours to just 50 minutes.

"The trials will last three months longer than those conducted on the Beijing-Shanghai route," Zhang Junqing, chief engineer with the Xi'an Railway Construction Company, was quoted as saying by the Beijing Times yesterday.

The Beijing-Shijiazhuang line will connect with three other high-speed rail links from Shijiazhuang to Wuhan, Wuhan to Guangzhou and Guangzhou to Shenzhen and Hong Kong. The 2,400-kilometer-long high-speed rail artery is expected to cut travel time from Beijing to Hong Kong from nearly 23 hours to around eight. Service is expected to begin in 2014.

The departure station of the new line will be the Beijing West Railway Station, in Fengtai district.

Shi Qixin, a professor with the Institute of Transportation Engineering at Tsinghua University, told the Global Times that high-speed rail service from Beijing to Guangzhou is important to China's transportation development strategy.

"Competition between air carriers and railways will further heat up after the completion of the links between Beijing and Guangzhou. Both airline companies and rail operator will have to make adjustments and consider price reductions," he said.

"High-speed rail is more convenient, more punctual and has a better safety record. But the current pricing system still poses challenges to the high-speed railway, in comparison to the airlines that always offer discounts," Shi noted.

A first-class ticket from Wuhan to Guangzhou is priced at 740 yuan ($117.04), and a second-class at 465 yuan.

China plans to run high-speed rail between 70 percent of its key cities by 2020.

http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS/tabid...th-artery.aspx
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Old May 23rd, 2012, 11:16 PM   #3991
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Unless operating speed is restored it's going to be somewhat difficult for very long haul routes such as Beijing-Guangzhou to be competitive with airlines. During normal seasons if you book in advance the airline tickets are frequently discounted by 60-70%. On the other hand short overnight sleeper service may be desirable. But that' unlikely due to CRH's daily maintenance shutdown at night.
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Old May 24th, 2012, 12:51 AM   #3992
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
Unless operating speed is restored it's going to be somewhat difficult for very long haul routes such as Beijing-Guangzhou to be competitive with airlines. During normal seasons if you book in advance the airline tickets are frequently discounted by 60-70%. On the other hand short overnight sleeper service may be desirable. But that' unlikely due to CRH's daily maintenance shutdown at night.
If they want an overnight train. They can. This will lose three or four hours, but still competitive:

At 350 km/h:
- Beijing depart 20:00
- (hsr)
- Zhengzhou 22:10
- (old rail)
- Wuhan 02:10
- (old rail)
- Changsha 05:20
- (hsr)
- Guangzhou 07:30
- (hsr)
- optionally, Hong Kong 08:20
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Old May 24th, 2012, 04:48 AM   #3993
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Yeah it's not bad to go from Beijing to Hong Kong in 12 hours, I really like those overnight trains, the ticket effectively covers a hotel bed.
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Old May 24th, 2012, 10:06 PM   #3994
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Construction of the Datong–Xi'an HSR Line (May 16)





The 10-km long Yellow River bridge between Yongji, Shanxi and Heyang, Shaanxi. The Datong–Xi'an HSR Line is 859 km long.
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Old May 25th, 2012, 05:20 AM   #3995
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
Unless operating speed is restored it's going to be somewhat difficult for very long haul routes such as Beijing-Guangzhou to be competitive with airlines. During normal seasons if you book in advance the airline tickets are frequently discounted by 60-70%. On the other hand short overnight sleeper service may be desirable. But that' unlikely due to CRH's daily maintenance shutdown at night.
At that distance, it wouldn't ever really be competitive anyway. For example, the full line of the Sanyo shinkansen from Tokyo to Hakata takes roughly 5 hours and the share between rail and air on that route is: Rail: 10% - Air: 90%.

So unless suddenly the trains start running at 600km/h between Beijing and GZ/HK, I don't see it ever becoming a feasible competitor any time soon. (Sure there will be some who ride it for the novelty of the distance, much like the Trans-Siberian railway, or taking the shinkansen the whole way from Kagoshima Chuo to Tokyo, but that's not really going to be any significant proportion of people.)

High speed sleepers, however are entirely another story, and that actually looks like a very convenient and comfortable prospect.
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Old May 25th, 2012, 05:24 AM   #3996
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Personally, I would pick high speed train over airliners anytime below 1000km routes, if the average speed is above or equal to 300km/h.
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Old May 25th, 2012, 06:14 AM   #3997
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China moves faster in approving infrastructure projects
(Shanghai Daily, May 25)


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AS reported in JRJ.com, the central government has requested local governments to report their all infrastructure project investment for this year before end-June for faster appraisal and approval, and related central government subsidies for these projects will likely be appropriated earlier than expected.

This likely represents the central government's endeavor to boost the slowing economy, which highly depends on real estate fixed-asset investment. China's commodity property FAI growth fell from the peak of 63 percent in November 2010 to 9 percent in April 2012.

As reported by the China Securities Journal, since end-February, China has tremendously accelerated the appraisal and approval process for major infrastructure projects, such as highway networks, airport and railway lines. For example, the airport projects in Fuyuan of Heilongjiang, Shihezi of Xinjiang, Qingyang of Gansu and Jiangbei of Chongqing have recently received approval from the National Development and Reform Commission.

Observers said these are strong evidence of infrastructure FAI acceleration, adding that the central government's focus should be relaunching and completing the suspended major projects, most of which are in central/western China and some of them were suspended since last August.

Earlier, the central government also said to allocate more capital for the development of social housing, with the Ministry of Finance and Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development jointly allocated 10.5 billion yuan (US$1.67 billion) subsidy for low-rental housing projects, of which Eastern China accounts for 5.1 percent (540 million yuan), Central China accounts for 40.2 percent (4.22 billion yuan), and Western China accounts for 40.2 percent (4.22 billion yuan). This amount can also be used for public rental housing if the needs for low-rental housing have be satisfied.

In our view, the implications of these are: 1) With signs of a slowing economy, there will be more government stimulus; 2) Government's economic stimulus would focus more on infrastructure investment and social housing; 3) Basic tone of government tightening on the property market would remain unchanged with housing purchase restrictions to continue; and 4) There, however, would be more support on mortgages to first-time home buyers and genuine upgraders. We believe that companies focus on infrastructure and social housing would benefit directly.

http://www.shanghaidaily.com/nsp/Opi...re%2Bprojects/
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Old May 25th, 2012, 09:24 AM   #3998
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Beijing south railway to Tianjin West railway (new)

Timetable please
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Old May 25th, 2012, 03:56 PM   #3999
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
Construction of the Datong–Xi'an HSR Line (May 16)

The 10-km long Yellow River bridge between Yongji, Shanxi and Heyang, Shaanxi. The Datong–Xi'an HSR Line is 859 km long.
Is it running through a floodplain?
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Old May 25th, 2012, 05:03 PM   #4000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlosBlueDragon View Post
Beijing south railway to Tianjin West railway (new)

Timetable please

For a sentence to be understandable, and actually a sentense, it requires a verb.
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