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Old April 11th, 2013, 09:19 PM   #5701
chornedsnorkack
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China is building high speed railways many years after others. There are many things to bring as examples.

For example, the first. Tokaido Shinkansen.

Tokaido Shinkansen has 17 stations between Tokyo and Osaka.

13 of the 17 are existing low speed railway stations.

Only 4 Tokaido Shinkansen stations were new. Of them, the terminus, Shin-Osaka was built on the existing Tokaido main line where the 13 existing stations already were, on an empty stretch of the line 3 km from old Osaka station. Shin-Yokohama was built 8 km away from old Yokohama station - but it was built at an empty stretch of an existing suburban railway, so high speed station was built with a low speed station included. Gifu-Hashima and Shin-Fuji were the only stations that were not interchanges from the beginning, and later a branch line was built specifically to connect Gifu-Hashima station.

How many stations of Beijing-Shanghai high speed railway are served by low speed rail?
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Old April 12th, 2013, 12:40 AM   #5702
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post

How many stations of Beijing-Shanghai high speed railway are served by low speed rail?
I believe it will be quite easy to add additional tracks to these new stations if needed. They are very spacious. If I remember correctly Hongqiao rail station had 9 "slots" for future maglev lines, already.

Last edited by foxmulder; April 12th, 2013 at 12:46 AM.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 05:55 AM   #5703
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
How many stations of Beijing-Shanghai high speed railway are served by low speed rail?
I don't think any of them does
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beijing...-Speed_Railway

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jinghu_Railway

Edit: However, the old Jinghu Railway does run 200km/h (250km/h before slowdown) D trains. Actually the overnight (10 hr) D trains is the preferred run for people traveling direct from Beijing to Shanghai and vice versa, since you don't really loose travel time and save a night at the hotel.

Last edited by luhai; April 12th, 2013 at 06:04 AM.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 06:10 AM   #5704
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
China is building high speed railways many years after others. There are many things to bring as examples.

For example, the first. Tokaido Shinkansen.

Tokaido Shinkansen has 17 stations between Tokyo and Osaka.

13 of the 17 are existing low speed railway stations.

Only 4 Tokaido Shinkansen stations were new. Of them, the terminus, Shin-Osaka was built on the existing Tokaido main line where the 13 existing stations already were, on an empty stretch of the line 3 km from old Osaka station. Shin-Yokohama was built 8 km away from old Yokohama station - but it was built at an empty stretch of an existing suburban railway, so high speed station was built with a low speed station included. Gifu-Hashima and Shin-Fuji were the only stations that were not interchanges from the beginning, and later a branch line was built specifically to connect Gifu-Hashima station.

How many stations of Beijing-Shanghai high speed railway are served by low speed rail?
ATM China's low speed rail your referring to takes or plans to take the form of subways.

Last edited by saiho; April 12th, 2013 at 06:16 AM.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 11:06 AM   #5705
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CNN's Business Traveller makes a short piece on China HSR

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/04/11/tr...arebar_twitter
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Old April 12th, 2013, 11:49 AM   #5706
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Richard Quest: Utterly Insufferable

Interesting comparison otherwise
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Old April 12th, 2013, 12:51 PM   #5707
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Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post

Richard Quest: Utterly Insufferable

Interesting comparison otherwise
Right on. Could someone please get him to an asylum? The man obviously has some sort of mental issue...
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Old April 12th, 2013, 03:15 PM   #5708
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While not in China, the Europe entry is useful as well. A major issue in Europe, fragmentation, is not one that is likely to concern China rail any time soon (though it does for airline and integrated travel).

It all comes down to time, price, and aggravation. As far as aggravation goes nothing compares with Chunyun travel. Leaving that aside, the part of travelling that consists of actually sitting in a long-distance bus, train, boat or plane is usually quite fine these days. It is everything around it that can be stressful, getting tickets, getting to the station/airport, transferring, getting from the station/airport, delayed or missed vehicles. Here Europe can do better, as can China.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 07:22 PM   #5709
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1772 View Post
CNN's Business Traveller makes a short piece on China HSR

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/04/11/tr...arebar_twitter
I would not dare to arrive with only 30 minutes to spare and hope to make it through the long lines to pick up my train ticket!

Can locals use the automated machines to pick up pre-booked tickets? I was a bit surprised I couldn't do that with my Hong Kong return home permit.

But I do agree the train experience would still be far better than the delay-prone flights.

But then, USD 85 is quite a hefty sum considering Wuhan's lower working classes won't likely make more than USD 300 a month.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 08:59 PM   #5710
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You should have been able to order it online, and just needing to bring your credit card to the trainstation where they should have automated kiosks ready for you to print out your ticket!

I see China is much at the forefront of high speed rail, but when it comes to this, they are several years behind the western world in ticketing systems. Such a shame though! That is alot of time wasted right there when they spend billions on fast trains in order to save some time!

Those kiosks are a very small investment, so it is very depressing to know that its still not there yet...

by the way, I find Richard Quest funny sometimes, and he is refreshingly open with his questions. But he can also be annoying and narcissistic.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 09:07 PM   #5711
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Why even bother with kiosks? Should be possible to just print a ticket at home or even simply store in a smartphone.

Of course that can't be the only option for obvious reasons, but I fail to see why that can't be one of the options...
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Old April 12th, 2013, 09:28 PM   #5712
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saiho View Post
ATM China's low speed rail your referring to takes or plans to take the form of subways.
6 of the 17 Tokaido Shinkansen stations are served by subways. But all these 6 are served by zairaisen as well.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 09:34 PM   #5713
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Sunfuns: Smartphones or tablets is another great idea. But printing tickets at home doesn't really work. You normally have to change it into a ticket at the station anyway. For the magnetic strip etc. So it would still require a kiosk.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 09:58 PM   #5714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bannor View Post
Sunfuns: Smartphones or tablets is another great idea. But printing tickets at home doesn't really work. You normally have to change it into a ticket at the station anyway. For the magnetic strip etc. So it would still require a kiosk.
That is not true. I'm traveling with German ICE from time to time and usually print the ticket at home (or at work). The ticket includes a bar code which could be scanned with a laser just like an airplane boarding card plus you also have to show your ID on the train since tickets are not anonymous.
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Old April 12th, 2013, 10:59 PM   #5715
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Thats exactly what I mean, but have to scan it to get the boarding card... And for that you need a kiosk!

Otherwise you need conductors running round on the train all the time. And that seems like useless mumbo jumbo to me. Might just as well save the job and invest in kiosks instead!
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Old April 12th, 2013, 11:07 PM   #5716
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bannor View Post
Thats exactly what I mean, but have to scan it to get the boarding card... And for that you need a kiosk!

Otherwise you need conductors running round on the train all the time. And that seems like useless mumbo jumbo to me. Might just as well save the job and invest in kiosks instead!
Conductors are going through the train checking everyone's tickets anyway! The other option is to check/scan tickets at the station.

And by the way the paper you print at home is your boarding card for the flight, no need to get another one. You must not have flown anywhere recently or at least not in Europe/US...
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Old April 13th, 2013, 04:07 AM   #5717
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bannor View Post
Thats exactly what I mean, but have to scan it to get the boarding card... And for that you need a kiosk!

Otherwise you need conductors running round on the train all the time. And that seems like useless mumbo jumbo to me. Might just as well save the job and invest in kiosks instead!

When I travelled on the Thalys to Paris, I had my A4 print-out that I printed myself at home, and it had a big, complicated QR code which the conductors could scan with their little scanning device.
Very easy and convenient. Sure beat my Chinese ticket-buying experience where I had to wait in line for an hour for a ticket from A to B, only to be told that I would have to wait in line another hour at my transfer stop at B , because I couldn't buy the ticket for my next destination from B to C at station A

But the ride was a lot smoother once I was actually on the train
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Old April 13th, 2013, 04:16 AM   #5718
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
When I travelled on the Thalys to Paris, I had my A4 print-out that I printed myself at home, and it had a big, complicated QR code which the conductors could scan with their little scanning device.
Very easy and convenient. Sure beat my Chinese ticket-buying experience where I had to wait in line for an hour for a ticket from A to B, only to be told that I would have to wait in line another hour at my transfer stop at B , because I couldn't buy the ticket for my next destination from B to C at station A

But the ride was a lot smoother once I was actually on the train
Software issues.
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Old April 13th, 2013, 03:52 PM   #5719
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
When I travelled on the Thalys to Paris, I had my A4 print-out that I printed myself at home, and it had a big, complicated QR code which the conductors could scan with their little scanning device.
Very easy and convenient. Sure beat my Chinese ticket-buying experience where I had to wait in line for an hour for a ticket from A to B, only to be told that I would have to wait in line another hour at my transfer stop at B , because I couldn't buy the ticket for my next destination from B to C at station A

But the ride was a lot smoother once I was actually on the train
Be patient, friends. It will come. I am sure train ticketing will follow the airline industry's model of DIY ticketing in the future. China does not have the infrastructure to do this yet but I am sure it will come.
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Old April 13th, 2013, 04:12 PM   #5720
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Be patient, friends. It will come. I am sure train ticketing will follow the airline industry's model of DIY ticketing in the future. China does not have the infrastructure to do this yet but I am sure it will come.
I'm also sure it will happen one day, but I'd also like to add that solving this issue would cost less than one of their high speed lines which seem to be growing like mushrooms after a rain

The real reason probably is that there is no serious competition, occupancy rates are high and they don't particularly care about maximising profits.
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