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Old June 19th, 2013, 02:48 AM   #6101
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I have huge doubts that HK has anything natural left that's worth mentioning under "environmental" issues.

Environmental opposition against high speed rail is like being against fluorescent lamps anyway.

It all comes to politics.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 04:01 AM   #6102
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Given that 60% or so of Hong Kong's land is green space or national parkland, you may want to revise your statement.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 07:01 AM   #6103
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The Yangtze Delta Iron Triangle

The Yangtze Delta Iron Triangle
2013-06-18 13:01



By Ye Jingyu (叶静宇)
Issue 623, June 10, 2013
Nation, page 9
Translated by Zhu Na
Original article: [Chinese]

On the west shore of Taihu Lake in Yixing (宜兴), Jiangsu, Cheng Chao (程超) sits clasping a purple clay tea pot as he looks on at the misty Hengshan (横山) Reservoir with anticipation.

Within just the past few years, resorts and convention centers have sprouted up around the reservoir playing on the area’s well-known Dajue Temple. It’s all part of a drive to build the Yunhu (云湖) scenic area in preparation for the new Nanjing-Hangzhou high-speed railway.

Cheng Chao owns a tea house in Hangzhou and now he’s planning on opening a branch in Yunhu in order to get closer to Yixing’s tea plantations and resources. But more importantly, he believes that after the Nanjing-Hangzhou high-speed railway opens at the end of June, Yixing, which lies right between the two cities, will become a very popular tourist destination.

In preparation for the railway, the city of Yixing has also invested 250 million yuan in the Shanjuandong (善卷洞) and Yangxian (阳羡) eco-tourism scenic areas. Local leaders believe that it will be the perfect getaway for Shanghai, Nanjing and Hangzhou residents who were previously unable to conveniently travel to the city.

Yixing isn’t the only city expecting big changes from the new railway. It will complete what’s been deemed the “Iron Triangle” of high-speed transport in the Yangtze River Delta. Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing will be connected, and soon after will be joined by Ningbo.

Liu Zhibiao (刘志彪), head of the Jiangsu Provincial Academy of Social Science, says that opening the Nanjing-Hangzhou line will strengthen Nanjing and Hangzhou’s economic activity in the short term and further improve Shanghai’s status as the center of the Yangtze River Delta region in the long-term.

The “Weak Side” of the Triangle

As far back as the early 1990s, Yixing had planned to raise funds for a passenger railway line. However, this railway eventually became a freight line instead. And although Yixing had a developed road network, it didn’t provide the convenience needed to transport large numbers of people. This has presented an obstacle for the city’s development.

In fact, the whole area between Nanjing and Hangzhou has remained relatively underdeveloped because of transportation issues, making it the “weak side” of the Iron Triangle. This area includes the cities of Yixing, Huzhou (湖州), Liyang (溧阳) and Jurong (句容), as well as the five counties of Lishui (溧水), Gaochun (高淳), Changxing (长兴), Anji (安吉) and Deqing (德清). There are also 283 smaller towns in the area.

In 2004, the area between Nanjing and Hangzhou accounted for 34 and 23 percent of the population and land area in the Yangtze River Delta respectively. However, its GDP and fiscal revenue accounted for just 20 and 14 percent respectively, demonstrating that its economic performance has been lower than average for the region.

Shi Jinchuan (史晋川), director of the social sciences department of Zhejiang University, says that the Yangtze River Delta region has always had the structure of a “V-shape,” confining most economic interaction between the two cities and Shanghai, but not with one another. Now that the railway will turn the V-shape into a triangle, Nanjing and Hangzhou will become closer economically and drive new industries. Zhang Zhaoan (张兆安), vice chairman of the Shanghai Committee of China National Democratic Construction Association, says that human resources, technology, logistics and information industries all stand to benefit.

On Yixing’s online forums, residents have been talking about what businesses might gain after the railway opens. One resident surnamed Zhang is banking on business picking up for his car rental company after the line brings an influx of travelers.

The tourism industry may indeed become the first beneficiary of the new line. When it opens, it will only take half an hour to get from Yixing to Nanjing or Hangzhou. Some local tourism companies have already formed agreements with agencies in the two cities. Outside of Yixing, there are also tourism hotspots like the Grand Canal, Tianmu Lake and West Lake that are expecting a new surge in visitors.

Shanghai’s Status

The new Nanjing-Hangzhou line will undoubtedly divert passengers who previously had to transit through Shanghai. But Zhang Zhaoan believes that in the long-term, this is also an opportunity for Shanghai’s development as the region’s flagship city.

In the future, high-speed railway services will be increased between Shanghai and other cities, making everyone more interconnected. Currently, there’s about one train leaving for Shanghai from Hangzhou every 50 minutes during peak periods. That frequency will be increased in the future, making the Iron Triangle’s other nickname - “the one hour economic circle” – a reality.

Zhou Hongyun (周红云), deputy director and engineer at the Shanghai Railway Bureau, reported that the construction of the high-speed railway network in the Yangtze River Delta region will speed up and reach 3,200 kilometers of track by 2015.

http://www.eeo.com.cn/ens/2013/0618/245432.shtml
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Old June 19th, 2013, 08:33 AM   #6104
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Nice article. I like how the high speed railways will make more places "local" than long distance.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 08:36 AM   #6105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by China Hand View Post
Tunneling is the most expensive thing to do, irregular soil, layers of unknown substance appear out of nowhere, and HK has rules and regulations to follow that the mainland does not.

I have stayed in SZ and traveled back-forth to HK Island and it's time consuming and not convenient. Even with a fast rail link it is a long long walk through the various border controls.

Also HK is not eager to become part of Guangdong for so many reasons.
Why doesn't Hong Kong want to become part of Guangdong? I think I have some ideas but not really sure. I've taken the train from Kowloon to the border with Shenzhen and it seemed to take forever...12-14 minutes will be amazing.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 09:11 AM   #6106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdolniak View Post
By Ye Jingyu (叶静宇)
Issue 623, June 10, 2013
Nation, page 9
Translated by Zhu Na
Original article: [Chinese]
Shanghai, Hangzhou and Nanjing will be connected, and soon after will be joined by Ningbo.
Does it mean that Hangzhou-Ningbo high speed railway has become delayed?
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Originally Posted by gdolniak View Post
Zhou Hongyun (周红云), deputy director and engineer at the Shanghai Railway Bureau, reported that the construction of the high-speed railway network in the Yangtze River Delta region will speed up and reach 3,200 kilometers of track by 2015.

http://www.eeo.com.cn/ens/2013/0618/245432.shtml
What is the list of high speed railways in Yangtze River Delta that are under construction and shall open after June 2013, yet before January 2015?
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Old June 19th, 2013, 03:36 PM   #6107
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post
Why doesn't Hong Kong want to become part of Guangdong? I think I have some ideas but not really sure. I've taken the train from Kowloon to the border with Shenzhen and it seemed to take forever...12-14 minutes will be amazing.
Hong Kong isn't exactly on the best of terms with the PRC both in terms of politics and people.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 07:46 PM   #6108
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Cannot wait for this link to open. Why is it takes too long to open a less than 30km tunnel in HK?

Subway trips via Louhu from Kowloon is just pain. I am almost ready to rent or buy an apartment in SZ near the SZ North station and goes to work to HK via high speed train. HK apartment prices just sucks. When the high speed rail will be open, probably 25% of the HK people will relocate to Shenzhen.

Please God let them dig faster..
Where is is the visa controls going to be? At the station on the mainland side or after arrival in Hong Kong or onboard the train?
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Old June 20th, 2013, 02:01 AM   #6109
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On HK side at U/C West Kowloon terminal
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Old June 20th, 2013, 03:39 AM   #6110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
Given that 60% or so of Hong Kong's land is green space or national parkland, you may want to revise your statement.
The green space left is mostly there because it is hard to build on steep hills. The places suitable for urbanization is 100% filled in HK. Otherwise, they wouldn't build an airport in the middle of an ocean or build those walls of buildings or fill the sea. they didn't build those skyscrapers or the "airport in the sea" to save the environment. Do you honestly think high speed rail can hurt the environment, especially if it is elevated like Chinese are constructing..
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Old June 20th, 2013, 04:06 AM   #6111
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That's good and makes sense. Passengers can go all the way to Beijing without having to get off the train. How far will MTR trains go into mainland China?
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Old June 20th, 2013, 05:46 AM   #6112
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Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post


That's good and makes sense. Passengers can go all the way to Beijing without having to get off the train. How far will MTR trains go into mainland China?
There is a separate slow train from Hong Kong(Kowloon) all the way to Beijing, Shanghai etc.. If you mean the HK MTR subway trains, they just travel up to the border only + 20 minutes walk + 10 minutes queue at the border control.

TheWest Kowloon terminal will be probably one of the most beautiful land marks in Hong Kong and prettiest terminal in all of China ones completed. Hk people though complained with the price tag.


http://www.aedas.com/Express-Rail-Li...inus-Hong-Kong
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Old June 20th, 2013, 09:51 AM   #6113
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Some rendeer of West Kowloon Terminal

Park + high speed terminal hybrid


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Last edited by silent_dragon; June 20th, 2013 at 10:27 AM.
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Old June 20th, 2013, 12:17 PM   #6114
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Possible budget and contruction delay problems for the Express Rail Link project.

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Last edited by skyridgeline; June 20th, 2013 at 12:22 PM.
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 01:37 PM   #6115
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China's high-speed rail expands ticket discount

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China's high-speed rail expands ticket discount
English.news.cn 2013-06-22 23:33:37

BEIJING, June 22 (Xinhua) -- China's high-speed rail will start a summer discount for business cabins, state cabins and first-class seats on certain railway lines, the country's national railway operator announced Friday.

It is the first time for the high-speed rail discount to cover first-class tickets, but second-class ones, the hard-to-get tickets for some popular lines, are still excluded from this round of special offer.

According to China Railway Corporation, the discount, starting July 10 through August 31 and with variable rates of up to 20 percent, is implemented to "adapt to market demand."

The discounted tickets will be available for certain sections of the Beijing-Guangzhou and Beijing-Shanghai high-speed rails, some of which are discounted for the first time.

A faster way of travel, China's high-speed train services often receive complaints about its stubbornly high prices and transport capability unmatched with market demand.

Tickets around busy travel season, specially those of the economy class, often sold out soon after available, whereas some costly trains suffered low attendance.

"It is a good start, but I hope high-speed rails can be like the subway, running more in busy season and fewer in off season and not wasting on resources while claiming a deficit," said netizen "phils" on Sina Weibo, China's twitter-like microblogging service.

While some netizens complained that it provides little benefits to the price sensitive group targeting only second-class tickets, Wang Ming, deputy head of the Institute of Comprehensive Transportation of National Development and Reform Commission, said the discount is designed to adjust between demands of different market segments.

"Some passenger flows are stable. Some can be attracted by lower prices. The railway department has enough data to back up its decision and expects the price to balance the demand." Wang said in an interview with a local newspaper.

According to Guangzhou Railway Group, the national network's local operator in the southern transportation hub Guangzhou, this round of discount can provide a price reduction as much as 500 yuan (81 U.S. dollars) for business class.

Under the discount, prices for some short-distance first-class tickets will be marked down to almost the same as the second-class, the railway operator added.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2013-06/22/c_124896357.htm
To anyone of you, who want to travel in style this summer...
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 01:48 PM   #6116
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D trains stand for what?
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Old June 23rd, 2013, 10:05 PM   #6117
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D trains stand for what?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passeng..._China#Classes
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Old June 25th, 2013, 01:10 AM   #6118
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What is the list of high speed railways in Yangtze River Delta that are under construction and shall open after June 2013, yet before January 2015?
I think I recall having read about plans for a line between Suzhou and Jiaxing too. And perhaps one crossing the the river east of hangzhou. Though I'm not sure how far out it will cross.
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Old June 25th, 2013, 09:38 PM   #6119
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Where is is the visa controls going to be? At the station on the mainland side or after arrival in Hong Kong or onboard the train?
Speculating that it will be before boarding. You go through customs/visa/passport/immigration control, then you are able to buy a ticket, then board.
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Old June 25th, 2013, 09:51 PM   #6120
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Speculating that it will be before boarding. You go through customs/visa/passport/immigration control, then you are able to buy a ticket, then board.
I think you won't go through customs/immigration BEFORE being able to buy you ticket, because that would mean you would have to go through all that, only to be told your train tickets have been sold out.

You can probably buy a ticket months/days ahead of time, as with all train journeys, and on the day of your travels go through customs 60-30 minutes before train departure.
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