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Old November 5th, 2013, 03:08 PM   #6701
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He said, this feeling is so great.

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/X...eId=0_06_02_99
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Old November 5th, 2013, 06:41 PM   #6702
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I've only been on CRH1 from Guangzhou to Shenzhen, I cannot wait to try the faster trains. Hopefully by the time I visit China again the trains will be running regularly at 350km/h.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 06:36 AM   #6703
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Originally Posted by FM 2258 View Post


I've only been on CRH1 from Guangzhou to Shenzhen, I cannot wait to try the faster trains. Hopefully by the time I visit China again the trains will be running regularly at 350km/h.
In China we call crh1 "BIG METRO",because crh1is like a metro train,it has a very low fault rate,but the comfort level is too low,especially through tunnels,it is horrible.CRH380AL is an impressive train.super quiet,stable and an outstanding gas tightness.your ears will not feel uncomfortable when through tunnels.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 07:44 AM   #6704
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flankerjun View Post
In China we call crh1 "BIG METRO",because crh1is like a metro train,it has a very low fault rate,but the comfort level is too low,especially through tunnels,it is horrible.CRH380AL is an impressive train.super quiet,stable and an outstanding gas tightness.your ears will not feel uncomfortable when through tunnels.
CRH3 and CRH380B are very bad. (CRH5 is the worst, I would prefer to be in a hard seat of a normal train than in a CRH5. I am not going to talk about it.) I can never lock with the GPS satellites in the train cars, and there are no window sills or other facilities to place my GPS receiver. I have only once in CRH380C, it seems to be better designed. Anyway, the Japanese influenced CRH2 and CRH380A are the best.

So, CRH2/CRH380A >> CRH380C > CRH3/CRH380B > CRH1 >> CRH5
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Old November 6th, 2013, 06:53 PM   #6705
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I haven't ridden on them yet but from looks alone the CRH3(380B) and the CRH5 are my favorites.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 07:37 PM   #6706
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Gotta say that having problems with a vehicle due to being unable to set up a personal GPS system is hardly something that'd bother the average traveler though
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Old November 6th, 2013, 08:55 PM   #6707
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I can never lock with the GPS satellites in the train cars,
Have they now legalised the use of GPS?
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Old November 7th, 2013, 02:25 AM   #6708
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How are these horizontal segments attached to the pillars? Do they just fit together nicely so that no glue is needed?
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Old November 7th, 2013, 07:58 AM   #6709
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Harbin-Tianjin HSR to open on December 1st

G412/409, G410/411

The whole trip will take about 7 hours.



by 中华火车迷部落
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Old November 7th, 2013, 01:45 PM   #6710
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And Shinkansen E4 16 car sets have 1634, being the biggest high speed trains anywhere.
That high seat count is also the result of 3+3 seating in unreserved standard class, which greatly reduces travel comfort. This together with the limited top speed are the main reasons for the accelerated withdrawal of these sets.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 05:26 PM   #6711
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I'm sure they can fit a duplex but instead of engineering and testing a brand new car it's probably easier to just increase the frequency.
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Old November 7th, 2013, 05:34 PM   #6712
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big-dog View Post
Harbin-Tianjin HSR to open on December 1st

G412/409, G410/411

The whole trip will take about 7 hours.



by 中华火车迷部落
Do you know why it takes so long? The D train from Beijing only takes 8 hours. How come a 300 km/h G train to Tianjin is only 1 hour faster?
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Old November 7th, 2013, 07:12 PM   #6713
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What shall be the speed of Harbin-Shenyang-Yingkou-Dalian high speed railway this and next month?

It was opened in December 2012. Its speed was then 200 km/h.
It was only sped up to 300 km/h on 22th of April, 2013.

Shall Harbin-Shenyang high speed railway keep operating at full speed through the winter 2013/2014, or shall it be slowed down?
If so, when?

The distance Shenyang-Beijing is 703 km. Of which 404 km, Shenyang-Qinhuangdao, is a high speed railway of 200 km/h, and the remaining 299 km Qinhuangdao-Beijing is slow speed railway. The distance Shenyang-Tianjin is 689 km, of which 285 km, Qinhuangdao-Tianjin, is slow speed railway.

At present I see 18 D trains Shenyang-Beijing. Of these the fastest is D20 from Changchun, 4:41 with 1 stop (Suizhong North), and slowest is D52, 5:51 with 8 stops. Also 1 slow train is faster than D, namely T158, Harbin-Taizhou, takes just 5:34 - the next fastest slow train Shenyang-Beijing is T48 with 6:11.

There are now 4 D trains Shenyang-Tianjin, taking from 5:01 (D178 from Harbin, 4 stops) to 5:17 (D164 from Changchun, 6 stops). 2 of these 4 (D164 and D158) go on 10 km to Tianjin West - but although lots of trains originate from Tianjin West towards Jinan and beyond, for some reason neither of the trains from Shenyang continues there.

As of 1st of December, what shall be the best train time Shenyang-Tianjin, with 200 km/h to Qinhuangdao and 300 km/h Qinhuangdao-Tianjin?
At the same day, what shall be faster - Qinhuangdao-Beijing direct but on slow speed railway throughout, or Qinhuangdao-Tianjin-Beijing 300 km/h all the way?
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Old November 7th, 2013, 08:12 PM   #6714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
Do you know why it takes so long? The D train from Beijing only takes 8 hours. How come a 300 km/h G train to Tianjin is only 1 hour faster?
The section opened is only the Tianjin-Qinhuangdao PDL, you still have to travel through the older Qinhuangdao-Shenyang section and connecting to the already 350km/h Shenyang-Harbin line. So the only time saved is that ~260km section.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 07:27 AM   #6715
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Faster than a speeding bullet

Newest article from The Economist about the High-speed railway in China.

Quote:
High-speed railways
Faster than a speeding bullet

China’s new rail network, already the world’s longest, will soon stretch considerably farther
Nov 9th 2013 | XINING |From the print edition

THE new high-speed railway line to Urumqi climbs hundreds of metres onto the Tibetan plateau before slicing past the valley where the Dalai Lama was born. It climbs to oxygen-starved altitudes and then descends to the edge of the Gobi desert for a final sprint of several hundred windblown kilometres across a Martian landscape. The line will reach higher than any other bullet-train track in the world and extend what is already by far the world’s longest high-speed rail network by nearly one-fifth compared with its current length. The challenge will be explaining why this particular stretch is necessary.

Record-breaking milestones have become routine in the breathtaking development of high-speed railways in China, known as gaotie. In just five years, since the first one connected Beijing with the nearby port of Tianjin in 2008, high-speed track in service has reached 10,000 kilometres (6,200 miles), more than in all of Europe. The network has expanded to link more than 100 cities. In December the last section was opened on the world’s longest gaotie line, stretching 2,400km from Beijing to Shenzhen, on the border with Hong Kong (see map). The network has confounded some sceptics who believed there would not be enough demand. High-speed trains carry almost 2m people daily, which is about one-third of the total number of rail passengers.



Most of China’s gaotie construction has focused on the country’s densely populated east and centre. The Beijing-Shenzhen line, which is due to be extended into Hong Kong by 2015, links half a dozen provinces and 28 cities. In 2009 work began on the section that will connect the north-west of the country, a line that could hardly be more different from those that criss-cross the booming east. It stretches 1,776km from Lanzhou, the capital of the western province of Gansu, to Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang, an “autonomous region” bordering on Central Asia. Officials put the cost at 144 billion yuan ($24 billion); cheap perhaps compared with the 400-billion-yuan line from Beijing to Shenzhen, but it traverses such a vast stretch of barely inhabited terrain that land and rehousing costs are negligible.

Officials have given the project the ponderous name of the Lanxin Railway Second Double-Tracked Line. This is to distinguish it from a conventional line from Lanzhou to Xinjiang (the first syllables of which form the name Lanxin) that was completed in 1962. Oddly, however, it does not follow the same route. Instead of heading north from Lanzhou along the old Silk Road through Gansu, it detours into adjacent Qinghai province on the Tibetan plateau and opts for a far tougher route through the snowy Qilian Mountains before re-entering Gansu 480km later and picking up the old trail into Xinjiang.



Reports in the official media about the new Lanxin line are for the most part silent about the reasons for this diversion. There is little economic pull between Qinghai and Xinjiang. Just one flight a day takes off from Xining, the capital of Qinghai, to Urumqi. There are as many as eight a day from Lanzhou. In 2011 China Daily, an English-language newspaper in Beijing, quoted an unnamed researcher from the China Academy of Railway Sciences as saying it would be difficult to make any money from the line. “It’s more of a political thing,” he said. “It’s more about national defence and ethnic unity.” State-controlled media sometimes refer to it as “a political line, an economic line and a line of happiness”. The order is important.

Officials often talk of the line’s intended role in promoting ethnic harmony. But it appears to be more about knitting the country together. Tibetan exiles regard Qinghai as part of historical Tibetan territory. Some Uighurs want to make Xinjiang an independent “East Turkestan”. Officials say terrorist threats have been directed at the Xinjiang leg, and a recent incident in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square has been blamed on Uighur “terrorists” (see article). When the gaotie line opens, which is expected in late 2014, it will incorporate into the network three provinces covering about 30% of China’s land area. It will be a grand statement of the network’s, and the government’s, reach. Within a few years, Tibet is likely to be the only province without a high-speed line. But this is because even the government appears to reckon that a bullet train to Lhasa would be too costly. Tibet was connected to the conventional network only in 2006 after a remarkable feat of engineering involving track laid on permafrost.

Even some residents of Qinghai and Xinjiang seem unclear about the new rail line, most of which looks almost complete. East of Xining in Hongya village, where the Dalai Lama was born, a farmer describing himself as a relative of the exiled Tibetan leader says he believes the elevated track at the bottom of the valley 40 minutes’ drive away leads to Lhasa. In Xinjiang some residents seem unaware that the track will go through Qinghai. Few talk of the possible delights of sitting on a bullet train for eight hours between Urumqi and Lanzhou. Even though it will cut the journey time from 22 hours, it will still be far quicker to fly. Only one large city—Xining—lies between. Other stops are mostly remote towns.

One obvious benefit for Qinghai, or at least its image-obsessed officials, is an excuse to spend lots of money on the construction of business parks and apartment blocks around lavish new railway stations. The county surrounding the Dalai Lama’s ancestral home is engaged in an orgy of construction in what it calls a “high-speed rail new district”. Another benefit will be easier access for tourists to vast fields of rape that bloom in July in an explosion of photogenic yellow in Menyuan county north of Xining. Menyuan’s new station will disgorge passengers into the middle of such a field that is tended by inmates of a nearby prison (its function disguised by the name “Haomen farm”).

In the Qilian Mountains in the north of Menyuan 2,000 workers are toiling in plummeting temperatures on a 16km-stretch of tunnels, joined by a bridge, at an altitude of more than 3,600 metres (nearly 12,000 feet), the highest point of any high-speed track in the world. The official media have called this the most difficult tunnel project in Chinese railway history, owing to the area’s unstable geology. In September a 5.1-magnitude earthquake suspended work for a day. Construction of this segment is due to finish in early 2014 after more than three years. Beyond the mountains, on the fringe of the Gobi desert, workers face another problem: winds so strong that they derailed a train on the existing railway line in 2007. China Daily said gusts hurled grit so violently that it shattered the windows of engineers’ cars when they inspected the area three years ago. In one stretch, affected by gale-force winds 250 days of the year, the bullet train will pass through a concrete tunnel built to protect it.

Of the three provinces traversed by the line, Xinjiang has the most reason to celebrate, its excitement evident in the building of a colossal airport-style bullet-train station just outside Urumqi, with a vast new development zone around it. The province has 40% of the country’s reserves of coal. Bottlenecks on the conventional Lanxin line have frustrated efforts to exploit huge demand for coal in the east. Once the bullet trains are running, the plan is to dedicate the old line to freight. Zhao Jian of Beijing Jiaotong University is sceptical. “It’s preposterous”, he says. “Why not just build a new freight line?” To China’s rail planners, ever in pursuit of grandiose modernity, that would be too simple.

The Economist: http://www.economist.com/news/china/...farther-faster
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Old November 8th, 2013, 08:11 AM   #6716
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I enjoyed reading that article. I think this rail line can only be a good thing for China. Proud of them for achieving such a feat.
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Old November 8th, 2013, 11:44 AM   #6717
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
The section opened is only the Tianjin-Qinhuangdao PDL, you still have to travel through the older Qinhuangdao-Shenyang section and connecting to the already 350km/h Shenyang-Harbin line. So the only time saved is that ~260km section.
There are 10 trains daily Qinhuangdao-Beijing. 4 nonstops are 2:14 to 2:17 for 299 km. 5 stopping trains are 2:19 to 2:29 with 1 or 2 stops. D4538 goes to Beijing South, 308 km, in 2:31, and continues to Shijiazhuang (but originated in Qinhuangdao).
There are 2 trains Qinhuangdao-Tianjin, D176 and D58, both with 1 stop at Tangshan and take 2:27 and 2:30 for 285 km.
A 300 km/h railway would still take over an hour. So the time saving would be less than a hour and a half.

Saving 1 hour to cut Harbin-Beijing from 8 to 7 hours would still take 7 hours. Saving 1 hour from under 5 hour Shenyang-Beijing or Shenyang-Tianjin would cut the time from 5 to under 4 or 3 and a half hours. And that might make a difference for someone from Shenyang...
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Old November 8th, 2013, 02:18 PM   #6718
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Does the HSR railway to Xinjiang really go to 3600m in altitude? That would be just... wow!
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Old November 8th, 2013, 04:56 PM   #6719
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I have a China Rail map,update to 25 Oct, 2013, how can i upload,the file is 18 MB.super clear
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Old November 8th, 2013, 05:05 PM   #6720
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I have a China Rail map,update to 25 Oct, 2013, how can i upload,the file is 18 MB.super clear
Do you have anywhere to host it on the web?
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