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Old February 16th, 2015, 11:14 PM   #9001
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Wireless rail is on track as China seeks to develop world-first power system - Chinese researchers hope to create the world's first ambient power system for high-speed trains

China is developing wireless energy transmission technology to power its high-speed trains, in what it hopes will be a world first.

At least two proposals for the construction of the first-ever rail line with a wireless power supply are under review by the central government after scientists finalised them, according to researchers on the projects.

But "going wireless" poses some technological challenges that will not be surmounted easily or quickly.

Chief among them is the fact that, while it is currently possible to transmit energy without wires, it's not very efficient, especially at high levels and long distances.

There are also non-technical issues, including the high cost of the investment and strong opposition from both passengers and neighbours of the rail line, who fear high levels of radiation.

China has built the world's longest high-speed rail network, covering more than 11,000km by the end of last year, and the government has launched a global sales campaign to export the technology and rolling stock to other countries.

But the overhead power lines that serve the trains require frequent maintenance due to bad weather and rapid wear and tear.

Trains themselves also require maintenance, and the expensive pantographs - the apparatuses mounted on carriage roofs that collect power through contact with the overhead transmission wires - must be replaced every few months.

All of this adds significantly to operating costs, according to Chinese rail authorities.

Delays come most frequently from physical breakages or electrical short circuiting at the contact point.

The high-speed line connecting Beijing and Shanghai sustained 10 power supply failures in less than a month after it began operating in June, 2011. On September 21, nine trains were delayed on the same line with similar problems.

A team led by Professor Sun Yue, director of the Power Electronic and Control Engineering Institute at Chongqing University, recently proposed a 10MW wireless power system to the Ministry of Science and Technology to reduce the trains' operating costs and improve on-time performance.

South Korean scientists are building a 1MW experimental line but its capacity is still too low to be practical.

Sun said his system could "beam" more than 13,000 horsepower, or 9.7MW, to a train using resonant magnetic induction, enough to easily propel a fully loaded subway train or a high-speed train at 350km/h or more.

"But without government support we cannot develop a full-size prototype to overcome all the technical challenges of high-power wireless transmission."

China to date has bought most of its high-speed rail technology from Japan, Germany, France and Italy, but the wireless 10MW technology is new and has never been attempted by other countries.

"The solutions cannot be bought overseas," Sun said. "We must work hard to come up with our own technology."

Sun's design calls for the energy sending device to be placed on the railway track and the receiving coil in the train's undercarriage.

The system would require little maintenance and could function properly in almost any weather, including floods, Sun said.

The ministry was reviewing the proposal and, if accepted, a large national research project for wireless-power, high-speed rail and subways would be launched next year, he said.

Sun said his team was racing to solve some critical issues, such as reducing present energy loss in the system of about 25 per cent, and eliminating harmful radiation to passengers and people living near the line.

Upgrading an existing rail line with wireless technology would cost tens of millions of yuan, and the railways might stick with overhead wires due to budget concerns, Sun said.

Sun's team is seeking other practical applications for its technology. Last year it helped a Chinese home appliances company develop the world's first cordless kitchen blender and cooker.

The government's interest in wireless power for high-speed trains has attracted many other researchers, and the competition for funding is tough.

A team led by Professor Yang Qingxin at Tianjin Polytechnic University has proposed a different design that involves beaming coils installed in overhead power lines with receiving antennas mounted on the roofs of trains.

Zhang Xin, a researcher involved in Yang's project, said their proposal would be cheaper than Sun's undercarriage design as it required no retrofitting of rails.

But Zhang admitted their laboratory prototype was not nearly powerful enough to drive a high-speed train.

"We've achieved power output in the range 300kW to 500kW so far," he said. "We still need to solve many technical issues before testing it on a real line."

The Taijin Polytechnic proposal was selected as one of the top 10 promising technologies to change people's lives in future by the China Association for Science and Technology, and was exhibited at the China Science and Technology Museum this month.

Wireless energy transfer was an early dream in the field of electrical research, as demonstrated by the legendary inventor Nikola Tesla as early as 1891. But technical issues and safety concerns have limited its applications to small devices such as mobile phone chargers and medical implants.

Yu Xinjie , an electrical engineering professor at Tsinghua University, said it was essential that the government funded and supported such research, which had the potential to launch a new industrial revolution.

"China still lags behind developed countries in this area but with sufficient support we can catch up or even lead," he said. "But a more difficult task is convincing the public that it is safe. Though the radiation can be reduced effectively by shielding train passengers, it is still difficult to protect people outside or near the line. A lot of work is needed to address these issues."
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Old February 17th, 2015, 04:28 AM   #9002
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Hasn't that been done in Korea already?
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Old February 17th, 2015, 04:56 AM   #9003
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post

Hasn't that been done in Korea already?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccdk View Post
South Korean scientists are building a 1MW experimental line but its capacity is still too low to be practical.
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Old February 17th, 2015, 01:29 PM   #9004
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http://www.globalconreview.com/news/...e8e8d-r8a8i8l/
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Old February 18th, 2015, 02:44 AM   #9005
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Another article about the challenges for China to export its high speed rail technology.

http://news.yahoo.com/chinas-high-sp...134539931.html
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Old February 18th, 2015, 10:59 PM   #9006
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恭喜發財! As a reward for a new year, here is a brief travel report of my journey from Beijing to Tianjin. First the video side of the report.



Going down to the platforms at Beijing South.






On board the train taking a look at the rolling stock.






Window view of the train leaving Beijing South towards Tianjin. This is a view south as we leave. You can see the train get up to 275km/h.







Arriving in at Tianjin station! Views to the south as we arrive in.






Tianjin station panorama showing different CRH and general railway rolling stock.






The arrivals concourse at Tianjin station.






BONUS: panorama outside Tianjin station. It was really smoggy that day, but boy did it make for a pretty view.

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Old February 19th, 2015, 08:52 AM   #9007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lunarwhite View Post
Another article about the challenges for China to export its high speed rail technology.

http://news.yahoo.com/chinas-high-sp...134539931.html
Show me something worth doing that doesn't present any kind of challenge.
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Old February 19th, 2015, 09:11 AM   #9008
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Good point!
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 05:54 AM   #9009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lunarwhite View Post
Another article about the challenges for China to export its high speed rail technology.

http://news.yahoo.com/chinas-high-sp...134539931.html
High-speed trains steer to overseas destinations
16 February 2015
China Daily Excerpt

Chinese high-speed train companies are eyeing more contracts in overseas markets.

"The US will be the next strategic focus for us, after successfully winning the Boston contract," Yu Weiping, vice-president of China CNR Corp, said on Feb 11.

CNR won a 4.12 billion yuan ($659 million) contract last year to supply metro cars to Boston's subway system, the first US rolling stock order with a Chinese company.

"At least part of the metro cars will be assembled locally," said Yu, who is in charge of the company¡¯s overseas business. The company is exploring more opportunities in cities such as New York and Washington.

CNR also won a contract last year to supply 232 diesel locomotives to South Africa. Yu said the company will establish local manufacturing companies and create jobs for local employees.

Li Wen, deputy general manager of the corporate business department at the Export-Import Bank of China, said on Feb 11 that the bank is involved in promoting a group of important railway projects, including a high-speed train project in California. Li said at the end of January that the bank had provided $13 billion in loans to 35 overseas railway equipment export and rail construction projects.
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 10:53 AM   #9010
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China extends high-speed rail network to Xinjiang

The Lanzhou–Xinjiang High-Speed Railway, also known as Lanzhou–Xinjiang Passenger Railway orLanxin Second Railway (兰新铁路第二双线), is a high-speed rail in northwestern China from Lanzhou in Gansu Province to Ürümqi in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

Construction work began on November 4, 2009. The 1,776-kilometre (1,104 mi) railway took four years to complete, of which, 795 kilometres (494 mi) is in Gansu, 268 kilometres (167 mi) in Qinghai and 713 kilometres (443 mi) in Xinjiang. Track laying for the line was completed on November 16, 2013. 31 stationswill be built along the line. The project costs 143.5 billion yuan.

Unlike the existing Lanxin railway, which runs entirely in Gansu and Xinjiang, the new high-speed rail is routed from Lanzhou to Xining in Qinghai Province before heading northwest across the Qilian Mountains into the Hexi Corridor at Zhangye. The rail tracks in the section near Qilianshan No. 2 Tunnel is at 3,607 metres (11,834 ft) above sea level,making it the highest high-speed rail track in the world.

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Old February 22nd, 2015, 11:00 AM   #9011
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Old February 22nd, 2015, 12:47 PM   #9012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xizhimen View Post
Track laying for the line was completed on November 16, 2013. 31 stationswill be built along the line.
How many stations have been built along the line now that it is open, and how many will be built but have not been built?

On Beijing-Shenzhen high speed railway, there are several stations that will be built, but have not been built:
  1. Hengdian East
  2. Wulongquan East
  3. Lechang East
  4. Futian

Now that it is Goat Year... Are there any updates about the progress of these stations? Especially Futian?
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Old February 23rd, 2015, 01:33 AM   #9013
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The Birth of High-speed Trains by People's Daily

http://en.people.cn/n/2015/0216/c98649-8851318-10.html


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Old February 23rd, 2015, 03:19 AM   #9014
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Beautiful photos
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Old February 24th, 2015, 06:26 PM   #9015
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Beijing Railway Bureau HSR control/dispatching room

http://news.cbg.cn/gndjj/2015/0217/6...html#g642629=1













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Old February 24th, 2015, 06:57 PM   #9016
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Just went from Shenzhen North to Guangzhou South. The ride, while certainly not bumpy, was actually not as smooth as I expected. Top speed was 309kph, which is very cool.
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Old February 24th, 2015, 10:36 PM   #9017
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That's odd. Beijing South to Tianjin was smooth as butter.
Beijing South to Shanghai Hongqiao was also great.

Has anyone else noticed differences in smoothness when comparing tracks?
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Old February 24th, 2015, 11:20 PM   #9018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly_Walks View Post
That's odd. Beijing South to Tianjin was smooth as butter.
Beijing South to Shanghai Hongqiao was also great.

Has anyone else noticed differences in smoothness when comparing tracks?
From my experience G services that I used in China (Shenzhen-Guangzhou, Shanghai-Hangzhou, Shanghai-Beijing, Beijing-Guangzhou) were equally smooth and they were as smooth as it gets. Not sure what dodge321 is on about.
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Old February 25th, 2015, 06:21 AM   #9019
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Well we must have different definitions of "as smooth as it gets". I think while cruising on a flight when there is no turbulence is as smooth as it gets, you get long stretches where you don't feel anything. However, there were noticeable vibrations on the train.
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Old February 25th, 2015, 08:28 AM   #9020
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Quote:
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Well we must have different definitions of "as smooth as it gets". I think while cruising on a flight when there is no turbulence is as smooth as it gets, you get long stretches where you don't feel anything. However, there were noticeable vibrations on the train.
They gave you a broken one..
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