daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 1st, 2015, 10:29 PM   #10101
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,978
Likes (Received): 388

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
Even the new mega-stations and even high-speed CRH services seem to be barely coping with demand around this time. I really can't imagine (and don't even want to think about it) how it used to be when there was no CRH service and no big modern stations. Must have been an utter nightmare for people trying to travel anywhere.
Japanese also go home for new year (the wrong one), but Shinkansen stations are fairly small. How do they cope?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 2nd, 2015, 12:31 PM   #10102
Sopomon
Hideous and malformed
 
Sopomon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 870
Likes (Received): 153


Much more efficient boarding procedures, mostly.
__________________
And he kicked so many rosebushes at her that eventually, Sasuke turned into a log.
Sopomon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2015, 05:07 PM   #10103
Pansori
planquadrat
 
Pansori's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: London - Vilnius
Posts: 9,973
Likes (Received): 6911

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post

Much more efficient boarding procedures, mostly.
This could increase the capacity of stations drastically. Perhaps by times if done properly. By simplifying train boarding procedure and general access to the station waiting halls. But how long will it take before this will become a viable solution in China? 10 years? Maybe 15?
Pansori no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2015, 06:42 PM   #10104
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,978
Likes (Received): 388

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
This could increase the capacity of stations drastically. Perhaps by times if done properly. By simplifying train boarding procedure and general access to the station waiting halls. But how long will it take before this will become a viable solution in China? 10 years? Maybe 15?
What are the preconditions for such simplification?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2015, 07:08 PM   #10105
teddybear
City Reformist
 
teddybear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surabaya, Indonesia
Posts: 5,072
Likes (Received): 490

What is the boarding procedures in China that causes crowding?

I think the number of passengers also contribute.. look at the photos.. so many people.
__________________
**From Surabaya With Love**
teddybear no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2015, 08:07 PM   #10106
Pansori
planquadrat
 
Pansori's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: London - Vilnius
Posts: 9,973
Likes (Received): 6911

Quote:
Originally Posted by teddybear View Post
What is the boarding procedures in China that causes crowding?

I think the number of passengers also contribute.. look at the photos.. so many people.
From my experience based on Shenzhen North and Beijing West it goes as following:

Once you have the ticket first level of control is ticket stamping checkpoint before entering the station via the main entrance. Then the x ray baggage check and metal detector. After that you're in the main waiting (departures) hall with restaurants, shops etc. Then wait at the platform gate which has automated ticket barriers although they're opened only about 10-15 minutes before departure of the specific service. Once the gate is open you go to the platform by escalator/stairs and then board the train.

This basically means at least 3 potential crowding points and bottlenecks (some bigger, some smaller) during the procedure of entering the train in a major station so limiting the capacity and flow of people which otherwise could be much higher. Now of course there are reasons for that in China and safety and security always has to go first but the authorities will inevitably have to start looking at how to simplify this process to make things more efficient. Another alternative would be building even more or even larger stations or expanding the existing ones which is not a very cost effective solution.
Pansori no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2015, 08:19 PM   #10107
teddybear
City Reformist
 
teddybear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Surabaya, Indonesia
Posts: 5,072
Likes (Received): 490

I think security is very important, nowadays. They might need to streamline the process, but should still make security and safety check.
__________________
**From Surabaya With Love**
teddybear no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2015, 09:48 PM   #10108
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,978
Likes (Received): 388

How does the boarding procedure of Shinkansen major stations compare?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 01:01 AM   #10109
Sunfuns
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Basel
Posts: 2,426
Likes (Received): 361

Are there any restrictions on what you can take on Chinese trains beyond the obvious of weapons, explosives etc.?
Sunfuns no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 04:56 AM   #10110
drezdinski
Registered User
 
drezdinski's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 5,502
Likes (Received): 7332

Entry to each major station is controlled with metal detectors and x rays. Also, it's impossible to reach the gates before showing the ticket to the guard. In general one can take anything abroad as long as it's not explosive, very sharp or with bullets. However, it seems these safety measures are applied very loosely. The ticket check is very superficial, just one look, and many, many times have I seen the security guards just sit and chat next to the x ray, without a single glance at the screen. During the holiday season people tend to take tons of luggage which would take hours to check all. In cases like these, during holidays, army is employed to keep the order.
__________________
You know what capitalism is? Getting fukt!

Antonio Montana
drezdinski no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 06:28 AM   #10111
BEE2
Registered User
 
BEE2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 222
Likes (Received): 152

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
Tell me about it
I'm in Shenzhen right now and bought my tickets for Guangzhou and Nanning yesterday. Holy Jesus! Shenzhen North station is crowded as hell, queue for tickets took about 1 hour, crowd management in place with countless security and police officers ( including riot police with their armored vehicle parked near the main entrance). Even with online booking system and ticket machines (massive queues there too) it's a bit of a hassle by the looks of it. I couldn't get the tickets I wanted for specific service between Guangzhou and Nanning 5 days in advance so was more than happy to take another service on that day which was still not fully booked (luckily). What a bad time to take a train in China
Even the new mega-stations and even high-speed CRH services seem to be barely coping with demand around this time. I really can't imagine (and don't even want to think about it) how it used to be when there was no CRH service and no big modern stations. Must have been an utter nightmare for people trying to travel anywhere.
***********************************************************

I was told that it is better to stay home instead travel in China during
the holiday seasons( Chinese lunar new year, the National Day,...)
because most of the Chinese take their vacation during the long holiday
seasons. I can imagine how crowded it is at Shenzhen station as well as
other places in China.

With such a huge number of passengers, China won't worry about the
profit/deficit of bullet train lines at all.

Last edited by BEE2; October 3rd, 2015 at 06:34 AM.
BEE2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 06:36 AM   #10112
BEE2
Registered User
 
BEE2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 222
Likes (Received): 152

From the pictures showing the crowds at the train station, it proves that China
does need bullet train lines nationwide.
BEE2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 06:44 AM   #10113
foxmulder
Registered User
 
foxmulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,135
Likes (Received): 382

Of course. Most people who criticize Chinese high speed rail investment has had ulterior motives.
foxmulder no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 10:24 AM   #10114
chornedsnorkack
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 4,978
Likes (Received): 388

How does the number of passengers this National Day compare with passenger number the previous National Day? How does it compare with passenger number this New Year of Sheep?
chornedsnorkack no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 08:49 PM   #10115
Pansori
planquadrat
 
Pansori's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: London - Vilnius
Posts: 9,973
Likes (Received): 6911

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxmulder View Post
Of course. Most people who criticize Chinese high speed rail investment has had ulterior motives.
It was somewhat trendy until about 2012. Even the likes of The Economist and other respected newspapers in Europe and US were trying to do some 'serious' criticism to China's HSR investment. Nobody does that anymore. Just to avoid looking like complete fools. Doesn't take a genius to see why this has been one of the best investments ever. A complete life-saver and a booster to the quality of life to millions of people.
Pansori no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 09:08 PM   #10116
Pansori
planquadrat
 
Pansori's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: London - Vilnius
Posts: 9,973
Likes (Received): 6911

Quote:
Originally Posted by BEE2 View Post
***********************************************************

I was told that it is better to stay home instead travel in China during
the holiday seasons( Chinese lunar new year, the National Day,...)
because most of the Chinese take their vacation during the long holiday
seasons. I can imagine how crowded it is at Shenzhen station as well as
other places in China.

With such a huge number of passengers, China won't worry about the
profit/deficit of bullet train lines at all.
I took a train from Shenzhen North to Guangzhou South yesterday evening and it wasn't quite as bad as could have been expected. Yes the station was very busy but not overcrowded. Everything seemed to work pretty smooth without any noticeable problems. Trains leaving dead on time. Ticket check upon entrance and x-ray checks were in place but it was obviously completely 'fake' and the staff only worried to process everyone as quick as possible to avoid crowding at their 'departments'.

The only stressful part was boarding at the gate because the crowd seemed huge (probably filling the entire 16 coach train) and with only 5 minutes left before departure it was still not obvious that everyone will be able to get through those ticket gates with luggage, kids etc. I had to rush to my coach and some people were running not to miss the train. It was spot on and left 30 seconds before scheduled time but it's a tight operation and must be extremely stressful for people who work there. Again perhaps more to do with this awkward boarding procedure rather than national holidays.
Pansori no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 09:29 PM   #10117
Grunnen
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Amsterdam
Posts: 1,098
Likes (Received): 58

About the security: when I'm travelling, I usually have a pocket knife in my luggage. For if I need to cut bread or fruits or something like that. I think it is officially not allowed to take it on a train or metro, but so far it has happened only once that someone from the X-rays said something.
"Do you have a knife in your luggage?"
"Yes, look!" (showing it to them)
"Ok, go ahead"
Grunnen no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 10:05 PM   #10118
Traceparts
Registered User
 
Traceparts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 109
Likes (Received): 74

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grunnen View Post
About the security: when I'm travelling, I usually have a pocket knife in my luggage. For if I need to cut bread or fruits or something like that. I think it is officially not allowed to take it on a train or metro, but so far it has happened only once that someone from the X-rays said something.
"Do you have a knife in your luggage?"
"Yes, look!" (showing it to them)
"Ok, go ahead"
you can take knife, only "管制刀具" not allowed

dagger, triangular knife, switchblade (dagger) and other similar single-blade, double-edged, triangular knife
Traceparts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2015, 11:01 PM   #10119
luhai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 647
Likes (Received): 423

Quote:
Originally Posted by Traceparts View Post
you can take knife, only "管制刀具" not allowed

dagger, triangular knife, switchblade (dagger) and other similar single-blade, double-edged, triangular knife
Yes, my mom had very nice folding knife that she got from Germany for peeling apples and it was taken away at security check at train station. Interesting, it was apparently ok the tens of other times that she has taken it on trains includinge at the airport check in luggage. I guess it's like speeding 5 miles above the speed limit on freeways. Most of the time it's okay, until it is not.
luhai no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 4th, 2015, 04:23 AM   #10120
BEE2
Registered User
 
BEE2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 222
Likes (Received): 152

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pansori View Post
It was somewhat trendy until about 2012. Even the likes of The Economist and other respected newspapers in Europe and US were trying to do some 'serious' criticism to China's HSR investment. Nobody does that anymore. Just to avoid looking like complete fools. Doesn't take a genius to see why this has been one of the best investments ever. A complete life-saver and a booster to the quality of life to millions of people.

The development of HSR to China today is what the construction of interstate highway network to the USA in 1950s

Maybe for this time, you can upload the pictures and videos you take during this trip.
__________________

FM 2258, big-dog liked this post

Last edited by BEE2; October 4th, 2015 at 08:47 AM.
BEE2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
china, high speed rail

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium