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Old February 16th, 2016, 04:52 PM   #10701
hkskyline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Have any passenger count records been set on the way home for New Year?
http://europe.chinadaily.com.cn/busi...t_23491206.htm

Keep in mind the numbers are not only CRH.
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Old February 16th, 2016, 06:33 PM   #10702
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
http://europe.chinadaily.com.cn/busi...t_23491206.htm

Keep in mind the numbers are not only CRH.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xinhua
Chinese passengers made a record number of trips by train on Sunday as people returned to work after a week-long Lunar New Year holiday, according to China Railway Corporation (CRC) on Monday.
Is this then the record over and above the number reached on the way to New Year?
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Old February 17th, 2016, 09:57 PM   #10703
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For those CRH2C/CRH3C are they running any trains at 350km/h again anywhere? It's been almost 5 years since the accident in 2011... is it just an ROI thing running them that fast?

I'd imagine that for some of the longer express routes, it would cut a considerable amount of time off the journey.
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Old February 18th, 2016, 12:21 AM   #10704
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
For those CRH2C/CRH3C are they running any trains at 350km/h again anywhere? It's been almost 5 years since the accident in 2011... is it just an ROI thing running them that fast?

I'd imagine that for some of the longer express routes, it would cut a considerable amount of time off the journey.

I think they are still working on operational experiences. The lack of it was the major cause of that disaster.
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Old February 18th, 2016, 04:27 PM   #10705
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Producing high-speed rail tracks
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/bizchin...t_23538210.htm

Shibantan factory is China's largest rail track welding factory in Chengdu, the capital city of Sichuan province. The factory can produce the single 500-meter long seamless track used in laying high-speed railways.

Trains running on high-speed railways, which are made of seamless tracks, can improve safety, and won't make as much noise as common railways .

Since the factory was founded in 2008, it has produced 11,908 kilometers of rail tracks which have been laid on the railway network in China's southwestern provinces.

Workers clean rust from the rail tracks in the factory in Chengdu, Sichuan province, Feb 17, 2016


A man works in the factory in Chengdu, Sichuan province, Feb 17, 2016


Welders work in the factory in Chengdu


A worker heats the joints of a rail track in the factory in Chengdu, Sichuan province


Workers polish a rail track in the factory


Technicians work in the factory


Quality inspectors work in the factory


A man monitors the process of tracks moving in the factory
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Old February 18th, 2016, 09:07 PM   #10706
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That is a great post, thanks..
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Old February 18th, 2016, 10:07 PM   #10707
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyridgeline View Post
I think they are still working on operational experiences. The lack of it was the major cause of that disaster.
Sorry, yes I understand that... but the trains were running slowly for that accident. I don't think it really affected high speed operation, so I was just curious if trains were running at 350km/h again or if there are any plans to do so. I had heard from a friend they were, but i hadn't heard any news on it.

If not running, I was wondering if it's a cost-saving measure preventing 350km/h or a technical one.

I imagine it would save considerable time on the long express routes but add additional wear. What is the practical speed limit on conventional HSR? 320? 350? 380km/h? I guess that's not a question of China specifically, but given China has LONG straight runs of new track, I'd imagine that they should be able to set the standard for highest speeds. USA is huge but mostly car-culture, France is nice and flat, but relatively small, Japan and Taiwan are compact but have challenging geography, Korea is small.

When you have lines between Beijing and Hong Kong, there should be opportunity for very fast trains, assuming they don't make too many stops. But if it's just not cost effective, certainly China will be one of the first countries to show the limitations of conventional HSR.

Last edited by bluemeansgo; February 18th, 2016 at 10:12 PM.
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Old February 19th, 2016, 01:43 AM   #10708
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
Sorry, yes I understand that... but the trains were running slowly for that accident. I don't think it really affected high speed operation, so I was just curious if trains were running at 350km/h again or if there are any plans to do so. I had heard from a friend they were, but i hadn't heard any news on it.

If not running, I was wondering if it's a cost-saving measure preventing 350km/h or a technical one.

I imagine it would save considerable time on the long express routes but add additional wear. What is the practical speed limit on conventional HSR? 320? 350? 380km/h? I guess that's not a question of China specifically, but given China has LONG straight runs of new track, I'd imagine that they should be able to set the standard for highest speeds. USA is huge but mostly car-culture, France is nice and flat, but relatively small, Japan and Taiwan are compact but have challenging geography, Korea is small.

When you have lines between Beijing and Hong Kong, there should be opportunity for very fast trains, assuming they don't make too many stops. But if it's just not cost effective, certainly China will be one of the first countries to show the limitations of conventional HSR.
The lower speed limits were implemented network wide. It does give the decision makers more time to think/prepare things over when trouble strikes.

Right now - reliable, dependable and smooth operation is much more important.

Eventually, the max/average speeds will be increased due to the competitions from the airlines and less tolls on roads. Maybe that's when they'll introduce this bad boy ...

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Old February 19th, 2016, 11:04 AM   #10709
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CRH5E and CJ1 in Huanggutun Depot (皇姑屯动车所)

photoed by @CRHEMU

CRH5E (new shape) , 250km/h , 8-car sleeper train .




CJ1 , the one with double blue strip , is the inner city type train .


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Old February 19th, 2016, 11:35 AM   #10710
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Riding CJ1

photoed by @CRHEMU

The shape of it's head is a little bit similar to CRH5 , but shorter and smoother .




Rings beside the seat for holding , so it is the commuter type train , but none line (except CRH trains form Guangzhou East to Shenzhen) operated by China Rial Company is in commute-way operation (now you have to aboard a train right according to your ticket , another train to the same destination ? NO WAY!!)


Hand rail and space near the door for standing.




luggage panel


Unavailable to adjust the angle of seats.


This part is similar to CRH3C


Car number
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Old February 19th, 2016, 06:16 PM   #10711
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyridgeline View Post
The lower speed limits were implemented network wide. It does give the decision makers more time to think/prepare things over when trouble strikes.



Right now - reliable, dependable and smooth operation is much more important.



Eventually, the max/average speeds will be increased due to the competitions from the airlines and less tolls on roads. Maybe that's when they'll introduce this bad boy ...




In the context of the wenzhou accident, the train are going barely over 100 km/hr. It's the ill- advised use of manual override coupled with fail-dangerous visual signals that caused the accident. And the root cause is the management has put punctuality over caution and safety, and that can happen anywhere at any speed.
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Old February 19th, 2016, 10:56 PM   #10712
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Great pictures and posts dixiadetie and ccdk.

Never knew about the CJ1 train and I can't seem to keep up with all the CRH train variants.

Edit: I just found this page (in Chinese) that seems to list all the variants with pictures:

http://www.360doc.com/content/15/071...85255653.shtml



Curious, is this version of the CRH6 ever going to run?


Last edited by FM 2258; February 19th, 2016 at 11:06 PM.
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Old February 20th, 2016, 06:46 AM   #10713
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This page has almost full kind of CRH train sets , but it left some . I found a more complete one here.
More and more versions of CRH train are coming up , so the list will be refreshed frequently.

Only after seeing that page I know the former "CRH-G"(deep cold resistance) and "CRH-H"(anti-sandstorm) is combine together as the "CRH-G"

For the pic , that is the initial prototype of CRH6 , just the first car , but the shape was changed when commercial production started and the car in the pic never became a complete set of CRH6 train.
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Old February 21st, 2016, 01:13 PM   #10714
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@ dixiadetie
Thank you very much for the photos!

The CJ1 (CJ1002) is the CRH3A, right ? It is based on the CRH5A but manufactured by CNR Tangshan rather than CNR Changchun. It has 202 meters instead of 211,5; 5,120 kW instead of 5,500 and flows 200 km/h instead 250; as I pointed.

I am very surprised that the CRH5E only have 8 cars being sleeper, you will have about 315 passengers?

Of CRH3A did they only 8 train ?, and how many will be the CRH5E ?, is there any more or less updated list although it stay the next day old?

Anyway, the SSC Thread over China HS trains are here.


Moreover, in connection with the accident in Wenzhou, I remember the chronology of events.

Reducing the maximum speed in China and (null) regarding the accident of Wenzhou
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gusiluz View Post
Since it seems that no one answered, I will with my bad English. Sorry

The current maximum speed is 309 km/h, and was never circulated to 380 in commercial service.

Following the resignation (February 2011) for corruption of former Minister of Railways announced in April his successor a change in policy on HS: the speed of the HSR will be reduced from 350 to 300 km/h in July, and the rest of PDL from 250 to 200. The reasons given were: reducing energy consumption, lowering prices to fill the trains and for safety !!. Shortly after an "adjunct" nuance the words of his boss: the speed reduction would be only on lines with low occupancy and "of course" had nothing to do with security.

Meanwhile, on June 30, the Beijing-Shanghai line was inaugurated. It is the only projected to 380 km/h, but after many problems during testing was commissioned in 300, announcing the 350 "before year end" and 380 "some time later". In July presented problems of signaling and new trains CRH380A.
July 1 became effective speed reduction on lines with low occupancy.
23 of the same month the accident Wenzhou. In this accident he had nothing to do speed, so they have told: there was a storm, the first train (CRH1B # 46) stopped by a failure in a substation, signals broke down, it was getting dark ... and the second train ( the CRH2E No. 139, both entitled to 250 km/h) hit the first train.
In that vein, the SE Coastal PDL, full speed before July 1 was 250, and at that time was reduced, so the accident occurred in a limited line and 200 km/h. I do not know how fast the scope occurred, although it would not be too high: they derailed the last 2 and the first 4 cars; the problem is that it was on a viaduct and 3 of them fell into the void.
After the accident nor the maximum speed of 350 km/h was reduced immediately, but in stages: during August fell at least between Beijing and Tianjin (16), Shanghai-Hangzhou and Wuhan-Guangzhou (the 28). Also in August, but nothing seems to indicate a relationship, all trains were 380A factory to make changes, since continued to fail.

Sources (in English, although the entrance is in Spanish)
................................................
Ya que parece que nadie te contesta, lo haré con mi mal inglés. Lo siento.
La velocidad máxima actual es de 309 km/h, y nunca llegó a circular a 380 en servicio comercial.
Tras la dimisión (febrero de 2011) por corrupción del anterior ministro de FFCC su sucesor anuncia en abril un cambio en la política sobre la AV: la velocidad de las HSR se reducirá en julio desde los 350 a los 300 km/h, y la del resto de PDL desde los 250 a los 200. Los motivos aducidos fueron: reducir el consumo energético, bajar los precios para llenar los trenes y ¡¡por seguridad!!. Poco después un “adjunto” matizó las palabras de su jefe: la reducción de velocidad sería solo en las líneas con baja ocupación y, “por supuesto”, no tenía nada que ver con la seguridad.
Mientras, el 30 de junio se inauguraba la línea Beijing-Shanghai. Es la única proyectada para 380 km/h, pero, tras muchos problemas durante las pruebas se puso en servicio a 300, anunciándose los 350 “antes de fin de año” y los 380 “algún tiempo después”. En julio ya presentó problemas de señalización y de los nuevos trenes CRH380A.
El 1 de julio entró en vigor la reducción de velocidad en las líneas con baja ocupación.
El 23 del mismo mes se produjo el accidente de Wenzhou. En este accidente nada tuvo que ver la velocidad, por lo que han contado: hubo una tormenta, el primer tren (CRH1B nº 46) se detuvo por un fallo en una subestación, se averiaron las señales, estaba anocheciendo … y el segundo tren (el CRH2E nº 139, ambas series autorizadas a 250 km/h) alcanzó al primero.
En esa línea, la SE Coastal PDL, la velocidad máxima antes del 1 de julio era de 250, y en esa fecha se redujo hasta 200, así que el accidente se produjo en una línea limitada ya a 200 km/h. No sé a qué velocidad se produjo el alcance, aunque no sería demasiado elevada: descarrilaron los 2 últimos y los 4 primeros coches; el problema es que fue en un viaducto y 3 de ellos cayeron al vacío.
Después del accidente tampoco se redujo la velocidad máxima de 350 km/h de forma inmediata, sino de manera escalonada: a lo largo de agosto se redujo al menos entre Beijing y Tianjin (el 16), Shanghai-Hangzhou y Wuhan-Guangzhou (el 28). También en agosto, aunque nada parece indicar una relación, todos los trenes 380A fueron a fábrica para realizar cambios, ya que continuaban fallando.
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Old February 21st, 2016, 05:26 PM   #10715
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It is a well know fact that speed reductions were announced (or at least implied) well before Wenzhou accident. It was a coincidence that the accident happened around the same time.
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Old February 21st, 2016, 05:48 PM   #10716
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Thank you for telling me the appropriate Thread for China HSR train set !

Medias in China attacked the HSR in China at that time , not only complain about the way to deal with the accident . The train in the accident removed form the track without carefully survey , just for reopen the line , and tore the car into fragment (this was proved in the accident survey report to be a approach for the heavy machine like crane came into the site to work in the mud land and they have no choice but did this).
And the government was blamed for concealing the number of death (which was proved as a rumor soon).

Argue about " whether China should continue developing more HSR plan ? " or "Were the HSR in operation safe?" were the main topic of the medias in August , worrying the security of HSR .

Finally , today HSR has become the popular and decent way to travel in China , safer than the plane I can say , and the administrator of HSR in China approved a lot form the Wenzhou accident . I think China HSR has an optimistic future .
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 05:46 AM   #10717
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 05:51 AM   #10718
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drezdinski View Post



Interesting, the way it translates is more Bing like rather than google. Who the hell uses bing these days.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 06:29 AM   #10719
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Google is blocked in China, although translate works most of the time. However, this is probably Baidu translate or some other domestic software.
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Old February 22nd, 2016, 07:30 AM   #10720
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Interesting, the way it translates is more Bing like rather than google. Who the hell uses bing these days.
I have full trust on Bing translate rather than Google Translate though
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