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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old April 5th, 2012, 03:17 PM   #3081
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krnboy1009 View Post
Or nationalizing the entire tracks on the basis the it was the fed gov who originally built the entire system.
The gov't gave land grants for the transcontinental railways, and, in any case, the costs of nationalizing the railways would like be equivalent of purchasing all their stocks on the market. US$ 28 bln. for UP alone...
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Old April 5th, 2012, 05:38 PM   #3082
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Nationalizing the railway is political suicide for any administration.
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Old April 5th, 2012, 07:32 PM   #3083
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It would be.

But the fed gov does own NE Corridor.
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Old April 5th, 2012, 07:55 PM   #3084
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Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
Nationalizing the railway is political suicide for any administration.
Not to mention illegal
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Old April 5th, 2012, 08:39 PM   #3085
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Well then! I guess the next entrepreneurial step is the revocation of passenger rail from the corresponding US federal regulator's jurisdiction ...
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Old April 5th, 2012, 08:45 PM   #3086
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krnboy1009 View Post
It would be.

But the fed gov does own NE Corridor.
Different scenario.

Penn. RR had just went bankrupt together with other regional railways. Amtrak "landed" the NE corridor for peanuts, as services were bad and short-haul freight traffic had collapsed.
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Old April 5th, 2012, 10:12 PM   #3087
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Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
...that's why I have suggested to build the line entirely on viaduct, it's probably the only way to utilize assembly line style offsite fabrication and minimize labor usage. Also they need to build the line in one shot (I know, naive) so materials etc can be purchased in larger bulk to lavage a better price.
Maybe, maybe not. That volume of concrete and rebar (assuming a concrete structure) might be too much for the supply chain to handle, and cause prices to spike.

Further, if the contracts are really massive, you're reducing competition.
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Old April 6th, 2012, 12:56 PM   #3088
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Maybe, maybe not. That volume of concrete and rebar (assuming a concrete structure) might be too much for the supply chain to handle, and cause prices to spike.

Further, if the contracts are really massive, you're reducing competition.
The US may not be as much a manufacturing powerhouse as before, but it's still one of the most powerful industrial nation in the world, we will have no problem supplying the concrete and rebar to fabricate the girders. For a project of this scale I doubt any single entity can monopolize the whole contract, so there should be plenty competition.
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Old April 6th, 2012, 06:52 PM   #3089
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
Nationalizing the railway is political suicide for any administration.
Howabout having a 'third party' (public or private) own, maintain and dispatch the mainline track infrastructure, while any entity who wants to can run their trains on it, just like how roads, civil aviation and so forth already operate?

Mike
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Old April 6th, 2012, 06:57 PM   #3090
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmwv View Post
The US may not be as much a manufacturing powerhouse as before, but it's still one of the most powerful industrial nation in the world, we will have no problem supplying the concrete and rebar to fabricate the girders. For a project of this scale I doubt any single entity can monopolize the whole contract, so there should be plenty competition.
I'm not getting your logic. Speaking as a construction guy.
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Old April 7th, 2012, 10:01 AM   #3091
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I'm not getting your logic. Speaking as a construction guy.
Which part?
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Old April 7th, 2012, 07:16 PM   #3092
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I think your suggestion be more a matter of assembly than construction ...
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Old April 7th, 2012, 10:28 PM   #3093
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COME ON AMERICA WAKE UP YOU ARE THE 3RD BIGGEST COUNTRY BOTH IN POPULATION AND AREA. YOU NEED HSR IT WOULD BE AN REVOLUTION BOOST FOR THE NATION.

LOOK AT EUROPE, CHINA AND JAPAN JUST WOW FEELING TO TRAVEL 220 - 300 MPH BETWEEN CITIES.

IMAGINE NEW YORK - LA IN A BULLET TRAIN 300 MPH FROM/TO CITY CENTER CITY CENTER. BEATS AIRPLAINE EVERYDAY A WEEK, i KNOW.

SHUT UP AND GET TO WORK

USA LOVER
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Old April 7th, 2012, 10:53 PM   #3094
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IMAGINE NEW YORK - LA IN A BULLET TRAIN 300 MPH FROM/TO CITY CENTER CITY CENTER. BEATS AIRPLAINE EVERYDAY A WEEK, i KNOW.

SHUT UP AND GET TO WORK

USA LOVER
Do you realize a 300 km/h (since there isn't 300 mph trains in commercial operation anywhere) LAX-NYC train would take, even if economically feasible to build, 16 hours to complete such trip???
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Old April 8th, 2012, 12:34 AM   #3095
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Do you realize a 300 km/h (since there isn't 300 mph trains in commercial operation anywhere) LAX-NYC train would take, even if economically feasible to build, 16 hours to complete such trip???
Shh, let the boy dream
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Old April 8th, 2012, 07:50 AM   #3096
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Agreed, a LOT of Europeans have no idea of just how truly *VAST* the USA is.

Despite there now being an estimated population of about 312M in the USA, there are many, many places where one can go here and be totally *alone*, with nobody else anywhere nearby.

From what I am aware of, the longest non-stop run on China's HSR network is equal to a short bit less than the distance between Chicago and NYC - with a scheduled 'door close-door open' time of about 3.5 hours.

Los Angeles is nearly four times that distance beyond Chicago.

Mike
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Old April 8th, 2012, 08:11 AM   #3097
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kunming-harbin will be comparable to a ny-la...
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Old April 8th, 2012, 10:20 AM   #3098
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
Agreed, a LOT of Europeans have no idea of just how truly *VAST* the USA is.

Despite there now being an estimated population of about 312M in the USA, there are many, many places where one can go here and be totally *alone*, with nobody else anywhere nearby.

From what I am aware of, the longest non-stop run on China's HSR network is equal to a short bit less than the distance between Chicago and NYC - with a scheduled 'door close-door open' time of about 3.5 hours.

Los Angeles is nearly four times that distance beyond Chicago.

Mike
I agree that for a distance such as NYC - LA there really isn't any market for HSR, it simply cannot compete with airlines. However for argument's sake a NYC - LA train won't be a non-stop one, it'll have to stop at various cities along the way. Distance between stops will likely to be less than the Beijing-Nanjing non-stop train (1018km, 631miles). Theoretically speaking, by the end of next year or early 2014 the longest high speed train ride in China will be the Urumqi to Shenzhen train, with a total travel distance of about 4400km (2730miles). Such long train ride is feasible or even desirable in China during the Chinese New Year rush, but completely impractical in the United States.
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Old April 8th, 2012, 12:25 PM   #3099
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I agree that for a distance such as NYC - LA there really isn't any market for HSR, it simply cannot compete with airlines. However for argument's sake a NYC - LA train won't be a non-stop one, it'll have to stop at various cities along the way. Distance between stops will likely to be less than the Beijing-Nanjing non-stop train (1018km, 631miles). Theoretically speaking, by the end of next year or early 2014 the longest high speed train ride in China will be the Urumqi to Shenzhen train, with a total travel distance of about 4400km (2730miles). Such long train ride is feasible or even desirable in China during the Chinese New Year rush, but completely impractical in the United States.
There is almost nothing between Denver and West Coast to generate a solid demand for HST. Well, there is Salt Lake City - but the Rockies in between.

If you south, even El Paso is WAY too far from DFW to justify a link. Then hundreds of miles to Albuquerque, a middle-sized metropolis separated by more large swaths of nothing till Tucson or Phoenix.

I think, unless a huge internal migration to the area happens, a HST linking cities on the Midwest to West Coast is as unfeasible as a 6-lane highway Boise (MT) - Wasilla (AK)
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Old April 8th, 2012, 07:02 PM   #3100
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Some areas will "always" be ruled by cars (or donkeys if and when civilization fails) for short distances and airplanes for the large ones. I was on vacation in Montana and Wyoming last summer - a perfect example of such a place. USA has many more of those...

And there is really no problem with that. Plenty of other places still on this planet where trains in general and HSR in particular would be a valuable and economically feasible addition.
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